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Antibiotics, gut microbiota, environment in early life and type 1 diabetes.
Pharmacol Res 2017; 119:219-226PR

Abstract

The gut microbiota interact with innate immune cells and play an important role in shaping the immune system. Many factors may influence the composition of the microbiota such as mode of birth, diet, infections and medication including antibiotics. In diseases with a multifactorial etiology, like type 1 diabetes, manipulation and alterations of the microbiota in animal models have been shown to influence the incidence and onset of disease. The microbiota are an important part of the internal environment and understanding how these bacteria interact with the innate immune cells to generate immune tolerance may open up opportunities for development of new therapeutic strategies. In this review, we discuss recent findings in relation to the microbiota, particularly in the context of type 1 diabetes.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Section of Endocrinology & Metabolism, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, 06520, USA.Division of Infection and Immunity, Cardiff University School of Medicine, Cardiff, CF14 4XN, UK.Section of Endocrinology & Metabolism, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, 06520, USA. Electronic address: li.wen@yale.edu.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Review
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

Language

eng

PubMed ID

28188825

Citation

Hu, Youjia, et al. "Antibiotics, Gut Microbiota, Environment in Early Life and Type 1 Diabetes." Pharmacological Research, vol. 119, 2017, pp. 219-226.
Hu Y, Wong FS, Wen L. Antibiotics, gut microbiota, environment in early life and type 1 diabetes. Pharmacol Res. 2017;119:219-226.
Hu, Y., Wong, F. S., & Wen, L. (2017). Antibiotics, gut microbiota, environment in early life and type 1 diabetes. Pharmacological Research, 119, pp. 219-226. doi:10.1016/j.phrs.2017.01.034.
Hu Y, Wong FS, Wen L. Antibiotics, Gut Microbiota, Environment in Early Life and Type 1 Diabetes. Pharmacol Res. 2017;119:219-226. PubMed PMID: 28188825.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Antibiotics, gut microbiota, environment in early life and type 1 diabetes. AU - Hu,Youjia, AU - Wong,F Susan, AU - Wen,Li, Y1 - 2017/02/07/ PY - 2017/01/01/received PY - 2017/01/06/revised PY - 2017/01/06/accepted PY - 2017/2/12/pubmed PY - 2017/5/23/medline PY - 2017/2/12/entrez KW - Gut microbiota KW - Immune regulation KW - Neonatal immune response KW - Type 1 diabetes SP - 219 EP - 226 JF - Pharmacological research JO - Pharmacol. Res. VL - 119 N2 - The gut microbiota interact with innate immune cells and play an important role in shaping the immune system. Many factors may influence the composition of the microbiota such as mode of birth, diet, infections and medication including antibiotics. In diseases with a multifactorial etiology, like type 1 diabetes, manipulation and alterations of the microbiota in animal models have been shown to influence the incidence and onset of disease. The microbiota are an important part of the internal environment and understanding how these bacteria interact with the innate immune cells to generate immune tolerance may open up opportunities for development of new therapeutic strategies. In this review, we discuss recent findings in relation to the microbiota, particularly in the context of type 1 diabetes. SN - 1096-1186 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/28188825/Antibiotics_gut_microbiota_environment_in_early_life_and_type_1_diabetes_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S1043-6618(17)30001-4 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -