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Factors associated with parental reasons for "no-intent" to vaccinate female adolescents with human papillomavirus vaccine: National Immunization Survey - Teen 2008-2012.
BMC Pediatr. 2017 02 13; 17(1):52.BPed

Abstract

BACKGROUND

1) To identify socio-demographic factors associated with parental "no-intent" for their 13-17 year old unvaccinated daughter to receive the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine series within the next twelve months, 2) to describe patterns in "no-intent" by socio-demographic factors, and 3) to identify socio-demographic factors associated with parental reasons for "no-intent".

METHODS

Data from 2008-2012 National Immunization Survey - Teen (NIS - Teen) were examined in this study. Parents with "no-intent" to vaccinate their daughters were asked to identify reasons for their decision. All responses were categorized into five domains identified as barriers to receive the HPV vaccine series: 1) Safety and Effectiveness Concerns; 2) Systemic Barriers; 3) Vaccine Misinformation; 4) Lack of Knowledge about the Vaccine; and 5) Socio-cultural Barriers. Multivariable logistic regression models were performed to address the study objectives.

RESULTS

Number of people in the household, household income, mother's age, education, health insurance, recommendation of a health care provider, and the survey year were significantly associated with parental "no-intent". Race/ethnicity, mother's education, marital status, recommendation of a health care provider, household income, age of the unvaccinated daughter, and the survey year, were significantly associated with one or more domains identified as barriers to receive the HPV vaccine.

CONCLUSIONS

This study identified sub-groups of parents across different socio-demographic factors with "no-intent" for their adolescent daughters to receive the HPV vaccine. Developing strategies that target educational tools towards the identified sub-groups of parents about the purpose, safety, and efficacy of the HPV vaccine, and HPV infection, may help increase HPV vaccine acceptance, initiation and completion rates.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Biostatistics, Environmental Health Sciences, and Epidemiology, College of Public Health, Kent State University, Hilltop Drive, 320 Lowry Hall, Kent, 44242, OH, USA. vcheruvu@kent.edu.Department of Biostatistics, Environmental Health Sciences, and Epidemiology, College of Public Health, Kent State University, Hilltop Drive, 320 Lowry Hall, Kent, 44242, OH, USA.Department of Biostatistics, Environmental Health Sciences, and Epidemiology, College of Public Health, Kent State University, Hilltop Drive, 320 Lowry Hall, Kent, 44242, OH, USA.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Multicenter Study

Language

eng

PubMed ID

28193249

Citation

Cheruvu, Vinay K., et al. "Factors Associated With Parental Reasons for "no-intent" to Vaccinate Female Adolescents With Human Papillomavirus Vaccine: National Immunization Survey - Teen 2008-2012." BMC Pediatrics, vol. 17, no. 1, 2017, p. 52.
Cheruvu VK, Bhatta MP, Drinkard LN. Factors associated with parental reasons for "no-intent" to vaccinate female adolescents with human papillomavirus vaccine: National Immunization Survey - Teen 2008-2012. BMC Pediatr. 2017;17(1):52.
Cheruvu, V. K., Bhatta, M. P., & Drinkard, L. N. (2017). Factors associated with parental reasons for "no-intent" to vaccinate female adolescents with human papillomavirus vaccine: National Immunization Survey - Teen 2008-2012. BMC Pediatrics, 17(1), 52. https://doi.org/10.1186/s12887-017-0804-1
Cheruvu VK, Bhatta MP, Drinkard LN. Factors Associated With Parental Reasons for "no-intent" to Vaccinate Female Adolescents With Human Papillomavirus Vaccine: National Immunization Survey - Teen 2008-2012. BMC Pediatr. 2017 02 13;17(1):52. PubMed PMID: 28193249.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Factors associated with parental reasons for "no-intent" to vaccinate female adolescents with human papillomavirus vaccine: National Immunization Survey - Teen 2008-2012. AU - Cheruvu,Vinay K, AU - Bhatta,Madhav P, AU - Drinkard,Lauren N, Y1 - 2017/02/13/ PY - 2016/01/07/received PY - 2017/02/01/accepted PY - 2017/2/15/entrez PY - 2017/2/15/pubmed PY - 2018/1/27/medline KW - HPV vaccine KW - National Immunization Survey - Teen KW - Reasons for no-intent KW - Unvaccinated female adolescents SP - 52 EP - 52 JF - BMC pediatrics JO - BMC Pediatr VL - 17 IS - 1 N2 - BACKGROUND: 1) To identify socio-demographic factors associated with parental "no-intent" for their 13-17 year old unvaccinated daughter to receive the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine series within the next twelve months, 2) to describe patterns in "no-intent" by socio-demographic factors, and 3) to identify socio-demographic factors associated with parental reasons for "no-intent". METHODS: Data from 2008-2012 National Immunization Survey - Teen (NIS - Teen) were examined in this study. Parents with "no-intent" to vaccinate their daughters were asked to identify reasons for their decision. All responses were categorized into five domains identified as barriers to receive the HPV vaccine series: 1) Safety and Effectiveness Concerns; 2) Systemic Barriers; 3) Vaccine Misinformation; 4) Lack of Knowledge about the Vaccine; and 5) Socio-cultural Barriers. Multivariable logistic regression models were performed to address the study objectives. RESULTS: Number of people in the household, household income, mother's age, education, health insurance, recommendation of a health care provider, and the survey year were significantly associated with parental "no-intent". Race/ethnicity, mother's education, marital status, recommendation of a health care provider, household income, age of the unvaccinated daughter, and the survey year, were significantly associated with one or more domains identified as barriers to receive the HPV vaccine. CONCLUSIONS: This study identified sub-groups of parents across different socio-demographic factors with "no-intent" for their adolescent daughters to receive the HPV vaccine. Developing strategies that target educational tools towards the identified sub-groups of parents about the purpose, safety, and efficacy of the HPV vaccine, and HPV infection, may help increase HPV vaccine acceptance, initiation and completion rates. SN - 1471-2431 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/28193249/Factors_associated_with_parental_reasons_for_"no_intent"_to_vaccinate_female_adolescents_with_human_papillomavirus_vaccine:_National_Immunization_Survey___Teen_2008_2012_ L2 - https://bmcpediatr.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s12887-017-0804-1 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -