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Vitamin D is not associated with incident dementia or cognitive impairment: an 18-y follow-up study in community-living old men.
Am J Clin Nutr 2017; 105(4):936-943AJ

Abstract

Background:

Vitamin D has been implicated as being important for maintaining cognitive function in old age. Results from longitudinal studies examining the association of vitamin D with incident dementia and cognitive impairment have been inconsistent.

Objective:

We investigated the relation between vitamin D, assessed in 3 different ways, and the risk of dementia.

Design:

We measured plasma 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] with the use of high-performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry, assessed dietary vitamin D intake with the use of 7-d dietary records, and created a vitamin D-synthesis genetic risk score (GRS) at baseline (1991-1995) in a cohort of 1182 Swedish men (mean age: 71 y). In a maximum of 18 y (median: 12 y) of follow-up, 116 men developed Alzheimer disease, 64 men developed vascular dementia, and 250 men developed all-cause dementia. An additional 80 men declined in cognitive function as assessed with the use of the Mini-Mental State Examination. Adjusted HRs and ORs were calculated with the use of Cox and logistic regressions.

Results:

The mean ± SD plasma 25(OH)D concentration was 68.7 ± 19.1 nmol/L. Plasma 25(OH)D, dietary vitamin D intake, and vitamin D-synthesis GRS were not associated with any cognitive outcomes (crude and adjusted HRs and ORs were ∼1.0 for all continuous exposures). The adjusted HR for all-cause dementia was 0.88 (95% CI: 0.59, 1.31) in men with plasma 25(OH)D concentrations ≤50 compared with >75 nmol/L. The adjusted HR for all-cause dementia was 0.92 (95% CI: 0.63, 1.32) for the lowest compared with highest tertiles of vitamin D intake. The adjusted HR for the continuous GRS for all-cause dementia was 1.04 (95% CI: 0.91, 1.19).

Conclusion:

In this cohort study, we show that there is no association between baseline vitamin D status and long-term risk of dementia or cognitive impairment over an 18-y period of time.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Departments of Public Health and Caring Sciences/Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism, erika.olsson@pubcare.uu.se liisa.byberg@surgsci.uu.se.Surgical Sciences, Orthopedics, erika.olsson@pubcare.uu.se liisa.byberg@surgsci.uu.se.Departments of Public Health and Caring Sciences/Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism.Departments of Public Health and Caring Sciences/Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism.Medical Sciences, Clinical Pharmacogenomics and Osteoporosis, and.Departments of Public Health and Caring Sciences/Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism.Public Health and Caring Sciences/Geriatrics, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

28202477

Citation

Olsson, Erika, et al. "Vitamin D Is Not Associated With Incident Dementia or Cognitive Impairment: an 18-y Follow-up Study in Community-living Old Men." The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, vol. 105, no. 4, 2017, pp. 936-943.
Olsson E, Byberg L, Karlström B, et al. Vitamin D is not associated with incident dementia or cognitive impairment: an 18-y follow-up study in community-living old men. Am J Clin Nutr. 2017;105(4):936-943.
Olsson, E., Byberg, L., Karlström, B., Cederholm, T., Melhus, H., Sjögren, P., & Kilander, L. (2017). Vitamin D is not associated with incident dementia or cognitive impairment: an 18-y follow-up study in community-living old men. The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 105(4), pp. 936-943. doi:10.3945/ajcn.116.141531.
Olsson E, et al. Vitamin D Is Not Associated With Incident Dementia or Cognitive Impairment: an 18-y Follow-up Study in Community-living Old Men. Am J Clin Nutr. 2017;105(4):936-943. PubMed PMID: 28202477.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Vitamin D is not associated with incident dementia or cognitive impairment: an 18-y follow-up study in community-living old men. AU - Olsson,Erika, AU - Byberg,Liisa, AU - Karlström,Brita, AU - Cederholm,Tommy, AU - Melhus,Håkan, AU - Sjögren,Per, AU - Kilander,Lena, Y1 - 2017/02/15/ PY - 2016/07/06/received PY - 2017/01/12/accepted PY - 2017/2/17/pubmed PY - 2017/6/22/medline PY - 2017/2/17/entrez KW - 25-hydroxyvitamin D KW - Alzheimer disease KW - Mendelian randomization KW - cognitive impairment KW - cohort KW - dementia KW - vascular dementia KW - vitamin D SP - 936 EP - 943 JF - The American journal of clinical nutrition JO - Am. J. Clin. Nutr. VL - 105 IS - 4 N2 - Background: Vitamin D has been implicated as being important for maintaining cognitive function in old age. Results from longitudinal studies examining the association of vitamin D with incident dementia and cognitive impairment have been inconsistent.Objective: We investigated the relation between vitamin D, assessed in 3 different ways, and the risk of dementia.Design: We measured plasma 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] with the use of high-performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry, assessed dietary vitamin D intake with the use of 7-d dietary records, and created a vitamin D-synthesis genetic risk score (GRS) at baseline (1991-1995) in a cohort of 1182 Swedish men (mean age: 71 y). In a maximum of 18 y (median: 12 y) of follow-up, 116 men developed Alzheimer disease, 64 men developed vascular dementia, and 250 men developed all-cause dementia. An additional 80 men declined in cognitive function as assessed with the use of the Mini-Mental State Examination. Adjusted HRs and ORs were calculated with the use of Cox and logistic regressions.Results: The mean ± SD plasma 25(OH)D concentration was 68.7 ± 19.1 nmol/L. Plasma 25(OH)D, dietary vitamin D intake, and vitamin D-synthesis GRS were not associated with any cognitive outcomes (crude and adjusted HRs and ORs were ∼1.0 for all continuous exposures). The adjusted HR for all-cause dementia was 0.88 (95% CI: 0.59, 1.31) in men with plasma 25(OH)D concentrations ≤50 compared with >75 nmol/L. The adjusted HR for all-cause dementia was 0.92 (95% CI: 0.63, 1.32) for the lowest compared with highest tertiles of vitamin D intake. The adjusted HR for the continuous GRS for all-cause dementia was 1.04 (95% CI: 0.91, 1.19).Conclusion: In this cohort study, we show that there is no association between baseline vitamin D status and long-term risk of dementia or cognitive impairment over an 18-y period of time. SN - 1938-3207 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/28202477/Vitamin_D_is_not_associated_with_incident_dementia_or_cognitive_impairment:_an_18_y_follow_up_study_in_community_living_old_men_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/ajcn/article-lookup/doi/10.3945/ajcn.116.141531 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -