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Cardiovascular risk in different obesity phenotypes over a decade follow-up: Tehran Lipid and Glucose Study.
Atherosclerosis 2017; 258:65-71A

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND AIMS

Considering the inconsistent data available on cardiovascular (CV) risk of different obesity phenotypes, the aim of this study was to investigate the development of cardiovascular disease (CVD) in different obesity phenotypes over a median follow-up of 12 years.

METHODS

In this large population-based cohort, 7842 participants (44.8% men), aged ≥ 30 years, were enrolled. Participants were divided into six phenotypes based on body mass index and metabolic status. Metabolic health was defined based on two definitions: 1) having ≤1 component of metabolic syndrome using the Joint Interim Statement (JIS) criteria and 2) homeostasis model assessment-insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) < 2.6 mole × μU/L2. Multivariate adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) were calculated for cardiovascular events.

RESULTS

A total of 712 new CVD events occurred. CV risk increased in all metabolically unhealthy phenotypes. Multivariable adjusted HRs for CVD events in metabolically healthy overweight (MHOW) and metabolically healthy obese (MHO) participants were 1.22 (0.73-2.04) and 1.74 (0.68-4.44), respectively. CV risk increased in all obesity phenotypes based on insulin resistance except the insulin resistance-normal weight group. However, this increased risk disappeared after further adjustment for metabolic risk factors.

CONCLUSIONS

Our findings showed that CV risk did not increase in MHOW and MHO phenotypes over a 12-year follow-up. However, all metabolically unhealthy phenotypes were associated with increased incident CVD. Further studies with longer follow-up are needed to confirm the benign nature of MHOW/MHO phenotypes.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Obesity Research Center, Research Institute for Endocrine Sciences, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Science, Tehran, Iran.Endocrine Research Center, Research Institute for Endocrine Sciences, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Science, Tehran, Iran.Obesity Research Center, Research Institute for Endocrine Sciences, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Science, Tehran, Iran.Obesity Research Center, Research Institute for Endocrine Sciences, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Science, Tehran, Iran.Division of Endocrinology, Department of Internal Medicine, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Science, Tehran, Iran.Endocrine Research Center, Research Institute for Endocrine Sciences, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Science, Tehran, Iran.Obesity Research Center, Research Institute for Endocrine Sciences, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Science, Tehran, Iran. Electronic address: fhospanah@endocrine.ac.ir.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

28213199

Citation

Mirzaei, Bita, et al. "Cardiovascular Risk in Different Obesity Phenotypes Over a Decade Follow-up: Tehran Lipid and Glucose Study." Atherosclerosis, vol. 258, 2017, pp. 65-71.
Mirzaei B, Abdi H, Serahati S, et al. Cardiovascular risk in different obesity phenotypes over a decade follow-up: Tehran Lipid and Glucose Study. Atherosclerosis. 2017;258:65-71.
Mirzaei, B., Abdi, H., Serahati, S., Barzin, M., Niroomand, M., Azizi, F., & Hosseinpanah, F. (2017). Cardiovascular risk in different obesity phenotypes over a decade follow-up: Tehran Lipid and Glucose Study. Atherosclerosis, 258, pp. 65-71. doi:10.1016/j.atherosclerosis.2017.02.002.
Mirzaei B, et al. Cardiovascular Risk in Different Obesity Phenotypes Over a Decade Follow-up: Tehran Lipid and Glucose Study. Atherosclerosis. 2017;258:65-71. PubMed PMID: 28213199.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Cardiovascular risk in different obesity phenotypes over a decade follow-up: Tehran Lipid and Glucose Study. AU - Mirzaei,Bita, AU - Abdi,Hengameh, AU - Serahati,Sara, AU - Barzin,Maryam, AU - Niroomand,Mahtab, AU - Azizi,Fereidoun, AU - Hosseinpanah,Farhad, Y1 - 2017/02/03/ PY - 2016/09/13/received PY - 2016/12/27/revised PY - 2017/02/02/accepted PY - 2017/2/19/pubmed PY - 2017/11/29/medline PY - 2017/2/19/entrez SP - 65 EP - 71 JF - Atherosclerosis JO - Atherosclerosis VL - 258 N2 - BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Considering the inconsistent data available on cardiovascular (CV) risk of different obesity phenotypes, the aim of this study was to investigate the development of cardiovascular disease (CVD) in different obesity phenotypes over a median follow-up of 12 years. METHODS: In this large population-based cohort, 7842 participants (44.8% men), aged ≥ 30 years, were enrolled. Participants were divided into six phenotypes based on body mass index and metabolic status. Metabolic health was defined based on two definitions: 1) having ≤1 component of metabolic syndrome using the Joint Interim Statement (JIS) criteria and 2) homeostasis model assessment-insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) < 2.6 mole × μU/L2. Multivariate adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) were calculated for cardiovascular events. RESULTS: A total of 712 new CVD events occurred. CV risk increased in all metabolically unhealthy phenotypes. Multivariable adjusted HRs for CVD events in metabolically healthy overweight (MHOW) and metabolically healthy obese (MHO) participants were 1.22 (0.73-2.04) and 1.74 (0.68-4.44), respectively. CV risk increased in all obesity phenotypes based on insulin resistance except the insulin resistance-normal weight group. However, this increased risk disappeared after further adjustment for metabolic risk factors. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings showed that CV risk did not increase in MHOW and MHO phenotypes over a 12-year follow-up. However, all metabolically unhealthy phenotypes were associated with increased incident CVD. Further studies with longer follow-up are needed to confirm the benign nature of MHOW/MHO phenotypes. SN - 1879-1484 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/28213199/Cardiovascular_risk_in_different_obesity_phenotypes_over_a_decade_follow_up:_Tehran_Lipid_and_Glucose_Study_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0021-9150(17)30052-7 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -