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Clinical and epidemiological assessment of patients hospitalized for primary and recurrent erysipelas
Przegl Epidemiol 2016; 70(4):575-584PE

Abstract

INTRODUCTION

Erysipelas is a bacterial infection, caused by group A β-hemolytic streptococci (Streptococcus pyogenes), rarely other bacteria. It is characterized by sudden onset and rapid course, with the presence of systemic symptoms.

OBJECTIVE

A retrospective analysis of patients hospitalized for primary and recurrent erysipelas with particular consideration of clinical profile of patients, causes, complications and risk factors of the recurrence.

MATERIAL AND METHODS

We have analyzed the medical records of patients hospitalized for erysipelas at the Dermatology and Venereology Department of the Medical University of Bialystok from 2011 to 2015.

RESULTS

One hundred twenty female (53,8%) and 103 male (46,2%) were included in the study. The median age was 61. The first episode of clinical symptoms was observed in 78% patients, while 22% of them were diagnosed as recurrent erysipelas. Skin lesions in both cases were located in the lower extremities most often. Mechanical trauma was statistically more frequently cause of the disease in men, while venous insufficiency and ulcers in women. Complications such as abscess, ulceration, phlegmon and thrombosis were observed in 22% of patients, significantly more common in men. Patients who were hospitalized more than 10 days were more likely to have higher body mass index and higher indicators of inflammation than patients who required a shorter hospital stay. Recurrent erysipelas was more often diagnosed in patients with co-morbidities, including hypertension, overweight, venous insufficiency and diabetes.

CONCLUSIONS

Erysipelas located in the lower extremities, high temperature on admission, higher indicators of the inflammation, complications and coexistence of obesity and diabetes are the risk factors of the prolonged hospital stay. Primary and recurrent erysipelas have a similar course, severity of the disease and duration of hospitalization.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Medical University of Bialystok, Poland; Department of Dermatology and VenereologyMedical University of Bialystok, Poland; Department of Dermatology and VenereologyMedical University of Bialystok, Poland; Department of Dermatology and VenereologyMedical University of Bialystok, Poland; Department of Dermatology and VenereologyMedical University of Bialystok, Poland; Department of Statistics and Medical InformaticsMedical University of Bialystok, Poland; Department of Dermatology and Venereology

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng pol

PubMed ID

28221013

Citation

Kozłowska, Dorota, et al. "Clinical and Epidemiological Assessment of Patients Hospitalized for Primary and Recurrent Erysipelas." Przeglad Epidemiologiczny, vol. 70, no. 4, 2016, pp. 575-584.
Kozłowska D, Myśliwiec H, Kiluk P, et al. Clinical and epidemiological assessment of patients hospitalized for primary and recurrent erysipelas. Przegl Epidemiol. 2016;70(4):575-584.
Kozłowska, D., Myśliwiec, H., Kiluk, P., Baran, A., Milewska, A. J., & Flisiak, I. (2016). Clinical and epidemiological assessment of patients hospitalized for primary and recurrent erysipelas. Przeglad Epidemiologiczny, 70(4), pp. 575-584.
Kozłowska D, et al. Clinical and Epidemiological Assessment of Patients Hospitalized for Primary and Recurrent Erysipelas. Przegl Epidemiol. 2016;70(4):575-584. PubMed PMID: 28221013.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Clinical and epidemiological assessment of patients hospitalized for primary and recurrent erysipelas AU - Kozłowska,Dorota, AU - Myśliwiec,Hanna, AU - Kiluk,Paulina, AU - Baran,Anna, AU - Milewska,Anna Justyna, AU - Flisiak,Iwona, PY - 2017/2/22/pubmed PY - 2017/7/1/medline PY - 2017/2/22/entrez SP - 575 EP - 584 JF - Przeglad epidemiologiczny JO - Przegl Epidemiol VL - 70 IS - 4 N2 - INTRODUCTION: Erysipelas is a bacterial infection, caused by group A β-hemolytic streptococci (Streptococcus pyogenes), rarely other bacteria. It is characterized by sudden onset and rapid course, with the presence of systemic symptoms. OBJECTIVE: A retrospective analysis of patients hospitalized for primary and recurrent erysipelas with particular consideration of clinical profile of patients, causes, complications and risk factors of the recurrence. MATERIAL AND METHODS: We have analyzed the medical records of patients hospitalized for erysipelas at the Dermatology and Venereology Department of the Medical University of Bialystok from 2011 to 2015. RESULTS: One hundred twenty female (53,8%) and 103 male (46,2%) were included in the study. The median age was 61. The first episode of clinical symptoms was observed in 78% patients, while 22% of them were diagnosed as recurrent erysipelas. Skin lesions in both cases were located in the lower extremities most often. Mechanical trauma was statistically more frequently cause of the disease in men, while venous insufficiency and ulcers in women. Complications such as abscess, ulceration, phlegmon and thrombosis were observed in 22% of patients, significantly more common in men. Patients who were hospitalized more than 10 days were more likely to have higher body mass index and higher indicators of inflammation than patients who required a shorter hospital stay. Recurrent erysipelas was more often diagnosed in patients with co-morbidities, including hypertension, overweight, venous insufficiency and diabetes. CONCLUSIONS: Erysipelas located in the lower extremities, high temperature on admission, higher indicators of the inflammation, complications and coexistence of obesity and diabetes are the risk factors of the prolonged hospital stay. Primary and recurrent erysipelas have a similar course, severity of the disease and duration of hospitalization. SN - 0033-2100 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/28221013/Clinical_and_epidemiological_assessment_of_patients_hospitalized_for_primary_and_recurrent_erysipelas L2 - http://www.przeglepidemiol.pzh.gov.pl/pobierz-artykul?id=2117 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -