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Serological Evidence of Lyssavirus Infection among Bats in Nagaland, a North-Eastern State in India.
Epidemiol Infect. 2017 06; 145(8):1635-1641.EI

Abstract

Bats are known to be reservoirs of several medically important viruses including lyssaviruses. However, no systematic surveillance for bat rabies has been carried out in India, a canine rabies endemic country with a high burden of human rabies. Surveillance for rabies virus (RABV) infection in bats was therefore carried out in Nagaland, a north-eastern state in India at sites with intense human-bat interfaces during traditional bat harvests. Brain tissues and sera from bats were tested for evidence of infection due to RABV. Brain tissues were subjected to the fluorescent antibody test for detection of viral antigen and real-time reverse transcriptase PCR for presence of viral RNA. Bat sera were tested for the presence of rabies neutralizing antibodies by the rapid fluorescent focus inhibition test. None of the bat brains tested (n = 164) were positive for viral antigen or viral RNA. However, rabies neutralizing antibodies were detected in 4/78 (5·1%) bat sera tested, suggesting prior exposure to RABV or related lyssaviruses. The serological evidence of lyssaviral infection in Indian bats may have important implications in disease transmission and rabies control measures, and warrant extensive bat surveillance to better define the prevalence of lyssaviral infection in bats.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Neurovirology,WHO Collaborating Centre for Reference and Research on Rabies, National Institute of Mental Health & Neurosciences (NIMHANS),Bangalore, Karnataka,India.Ecology and Evolution, National Centre for Biological Sciences,Tata Institute of Fundamental Research,Bangalore, Karnataka,India.Department of Neurovirology,WHO Collaborating Centre for Reference and Research on Rabies, National Institute of Mental Health & Neurosciences (NIMHANS),Bangalore, Karnataka,India.Ecology and Evolution, National Centre for Biological Sciences,Tata Institute of Fundamental Research,Bangalore, Karnataka,India.Department of Neurovirology,WHO Collaborating Centre for Reference and Research on Rabies, National Institute of Mental Health & Neurosciences (NIMHANS),Bangalore, Karnataka,India.Ecology and Evolution, National Centre for Biological Sciences,Tata Institute of Fundamental Research,Bangalore, Karnataka,India.Department of Neurovirology,WHO Collaborating Centre for Reference and Research on Rabies, National Institute of Mental Health & Neurosciences (NIMHANS),Bangalore, Karnataka,India.Bat Conservation India Trust,Bangalore, Karnataka,India.Ecology and Evolution, National Centre for Biological Sciences,Tata Institute of Fundamental Research,Bangalore, Karnataka,India.Department of Neurovirology,WHO Collaborating Centre for Reference and Research on Rabies, National Institute of Mental Health & Neurosciences (NIMHANS),Bangalore, Karnataka,India.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

28228179

Citation

Mani, R S., et al. "Serological Evidence of Lyssavirus Infection Among Bats in Nagaland, a North-Eastern State in India." Epidemiology and Infection, vol. 145, no. 8, 2017, pp. 1635-1641.
Mani RS, Dovih DP, Ashwini MA, et al. Serological Evidence of Lyssavirus Infection among Bats in Nagaland, a North-Eastern State in India. Epidemiol Infect. 2017;145(8):1635-1641.
Mani, R. S., Dovih, D. P., Ashwini, M. A., Chattopadhyay, B., Harsha, P. K., Garg, K. M., Sudarshan, S., Puttaswamaiah, R., Ramakrishnan, U., & Madhusudana, S. N. (2017). Serological Evidence of Lyssavirus Infection among Bats in Nagaland, a North-Eastern State in India. Epidemiology and Infection, 145(8), 1635-1641. https://doi.org/10.1017/S0950268817000310
Mani RS, et al. Serological Evidence of Lyssavirus Infection Among Bats in Nagaland, a North-Eastern State in India. Epidemiol Infect. 2017;145(8):1635-1641. PubMed PMID: 28228179.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Serological Evidence of Lyssavirus Infection among Bats in Nagaland, a North-Eastern State in India. AU - Mani,R S, AU - Dovih,D P, AU - Ashwini,M A, AU - Chattopadhyay,B, AU - Harsha,P K, AU - Garg,K M, AU - Sudarshan,S, AU - Puttaswamaiah,R, AU - Ramakrishnan,U, AU - Madhusudana,S N, Y1 - 2017/02/23/ PY - 2017/2/24/pubmed PY - 2017/6/18/medline PY - 2017/2/24/entrez KW - Rabies (animal) KW - rabies (human) KW - zoonoses SP - 1635 EP - 1641 JF - Epidemiology and infection JO - Epidemiol. Infect. VL - 145 IS - 8 N2 - Bats are known to be reservoirs of several medically important viruses including lyssaviruses. However, no systematic surveillance for bat rabies has been carried out in India, a canine rabies endemic country with a high burden of human rabies. Surveillance for rabies virus (RABV) infection in bats was therefore carried out in Nagaland, a north-eastern state in India at sites with intense human-bat interfaces during traditional bat harvests. Brain tissues and sera from bats were tested for evidence of infection due to RABV. Brain tissues were subjected to the fluorescent antibody test for detection of viral antigen and real-time reverse transcriptase PCR for presence of viral RNA. Bat sera were tested for the presence of rabies neutralizing antibodies by the rapid fluorescent focus inhibition test. None of the bat brains tested (n = 164) were positive for viral antigen or viral RNA. However, rabies neutralizing antibodies were detected in 4/78 (5·1%) bat sera tested, suggesting prior exposure to RABV or related lyssaviruses. The serological evidence of lyssaviral infection in Indian bats may have important implications in disease transmission and rabies control measures, and warrant extensive bat surveillance to better define the prevalence of lyssaviral infection in bats. SN - 1469-4409 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/28228179/Serological_Evidence_of_Lyssavirus_Infection_among_Bats_in_Nagaland_a_North_Eastern_State_in_India_ L2 - https://www.cambridge.org/core/product/identifier/S0950268817000310/type/journal_article DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -