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An examination of the factorial and convergent validity of four measures of conspiracist ideation, with recommendations for researchers.
PLoS One 2017; 12(2):e0172617Plos

Abstract

A number scales have been developed to measure conspiracist ideation, but little attention has been paid to the factorial validity of these scales. We reassessed the psychometric properties of four widely-used scales, namely the Belief in Conspiracy Theories Inventory (BCTI), the Conspiracy Mentality Questionnaire (CMQ), the Generic Conspiracist Beliefs Scale (GCBS), and the One-Item Conspiracy Measure (OICM). Eight-hundred-and-three U.S. adults completed all measures, along with measures of endorsement of 9/11 and anti-vaccination conspiracy theories. Through both exploratory and confirmatory factor analysis, we found that only the BCTI had acceptable factorial validity. We failed to confirm the factor structures of the CMQ and the GBCS, suggesting these measures had poor factorial validity. Indices of convergent validity were acceptable for the BCTI, but weaker for the other measures. Based on these findings, we provide suggestions for the future refinement in the measurement of conspiracist ideation.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Psychology, Anglia Ruskin University, Cambridge, Cambridgeshire, United Kingdom. Department of Psychology, HELP University College, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.Department of Psychology, University of Westminster, London, United Kingdom.Department of Clinical, Educational, and Health Psychology, University College London, London, United Kingdom.Department of Basic Psychological Research and Research Methods, School of Psychology, University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria.Research Methods, Assessment, and iScience, Department of Psychology, University of Konstanz, Konstanz, Germany.Department of Clinical, Educational, and Health Psychology, University College London, London, United Kingdom.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

28231266

Citation

Swami, Viren, et al. "An Examination of the Factorial and Convergent Validity of Four Measures of Conspiracist Ideation, With Recommendations for Researchers." PloS One, vol. 12, no. 2, 2017, pp. e0172617.
Swami V, Barron D, Weis L, et al. An examination of the factorial and convergent validity of four measures of conspiracist ideation, with recommendations for researchers. PLoS ONE. 2017;12(2):e0172617.
Swami, V., Barron, D., Weis, L., Voracek, M., Stieger, S., & Furnham, A. (2017). An examination of the factorial and convergent validity of four measures of conspiracist ideation, with recommendations for researchers. PloS One, 12(2), pp. e0172617. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0172617.
Swami V, et al. An Examination of the Factorial and Convergent Validity of Four Measures of Conspiracist Ideation, With Recommendations for Researchers. PLoS ONE. 2017;12(2):e0172617. PubMed PMID: 28231266.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - An examination of the factorial and convergent validity of four measures of conspiracist ideation, with recommendations for researchers. AU - Swami,Viren, AU - Barron,David, AU - Weis,Laura, AU - Voracek,Martin, AU - Stieger,Stefan, AU - Furnham,Adrian, Y1 - 2017/02/23/ PY - 2016/09/05/received PY - 2017/02/06/accepted PY - 2017/2/24/entrez PY - 2017/2/24/pubmed PY - 2017/8/18/medline SP - e0172617 EP - e0172617 JF - PloS one JO - PLoS ONE VL - 12 IS - 2 N2 - A number scales have been developed to measure conspiracist ideation, but little attention has been paid to the factorial validity of these scales. We reassessed the psychometric properties of four widely-used scales, namely the Belief in Conspiracy Theories Inventory (BCTI), the Conspiracy Mentality Questionnaire (CMQ), the Generic Conspiracist Beliefs Scale (GCBS), and the One-Item Conspiracy Measure (OICM). Eight-hundred-and-three U.S. adults completed all measures, along with measures of endorsement of 9/11 and anti-vaccination conspiracy theories. Through both exploratory and confirmatory factor analysis, we found that only the BCTI had acceptable factorial validity. We failed to confirm the factor structures of the CMQ and the GBCS, suggesting these measures had poor factorial validity. Indices of convergent validity were acceptable for the BCTI, but weaker for the other measures. Based on these findings, we provide suggestions for the future refinement in the measurement of conspiracist ideation. SN - 1932-6203 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/28231266/An_examination_of_the_factorial_and_convergent_validity_of_four_measures_of_conspiracist_ideation_with_recommendations_for_researchers_ L2 - http://dx.plos.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0172617 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -