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Benign Miliary Osteoma Cutis of the Face: A Common Incidental CT Finding.
AJNR Am J Neuroradiol. 2017 Apr; 38(4):789-794.AA

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE

Osteoma cutis of the face represents a primary or secondary formation of ossific foci in the facial skin. Its primary form has been sparsely described in the plastic surgery and dermatology literature. As radiologists, we routinely encounter incidental, very small facial calcified nodules on CT studies performed for a variety of unrelated reasons. We hypothesized that this routinely encountered facial calcification represents primary miliary osteoma cutis and is a common, benign, age-related finding.

MATERIALS AND METHODS

We retrospectively reviewed 1315 consecutive sinus CTs obtained during an 8-month period and their associated demographics. The number of dermal radiopaque lesions with Hounsfield units of >150 was counted, and we analyzed the association between the prevalence of these lesions and patients' demographics with logistic regression methods.

RESULTS

Five hundred ninety-nine males and 716 females from 4 to 90 years of age were included in the study (mean, 52 versus 51 years; P = .259). Among these, 252 males and 301 females had small facial calcified nodules (42.1% versus 42.0%, P = .971). The patient's age was a statistically significant predictor for having facial calcified nodules (odds ratio = 1.02, P < .001), while the patient's sex was not (P = .826).

CONCLUSIONS

Facial calcified nodules, observed in routine head and face CT imaging, are common, benign, age-related findings, which have been largely overlooked in the radiology literature. It is a manifestation of primary miliary osteoma cutis.

Authors+Show Affiliations

From the Department of Radiology (D.K., P.H.), Lahey Hospital and Medical Center, Burlington, Massachusetts.Commonwealth Radiology Associates (G.A.F.), Brockton, Massachusetts.Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology (H.S., J.A.), Okayama University Graduate School of Medicine, Dentistry, and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Okayama, Japan.Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology (H.S., J.A.), Okayama University Graduate School of Medicine, Dentistry, and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Okayama, Japan.From the Department of Radiology (D.K., P.H.), Lahey Hospital and Medical Center, Burlington, Massachusetts Peter.Hildenbrand@Lahey.org.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

28232495

Citation

Kim, D, et al. "Benign Miliary Osteoma Cutis of the Face: a Common Incidental CT Finding." AJNR. American Journal of Neuroradiology, vol. 38, no. 4, 2017, pp. 789-794.
Kim D, Franco GA, Shigehara H, et al. Benign Miliary Osteoma Cutis of the Face: A Common Incidental CT Finding. AJNR Am J Neuroradiol. 2017;38(4):789-794.
Kim, D., Franco, G. A., Shigehara, H., Asaumi, J., & Hildenbrand, P. (2017). Benign Miliary Osteoma Cutis of the Face: A Common Incidental CT Finding. AJNR. American Journal of Neuroradiology, 38(4), 789-794. https://doi.org/10.3174/ajnr.A5096
Kim D, et al. Benign Miliary Osteoma Cutis of the Face: a Common Incidental CT Finding. AJNR Am J Neuroradiol. 2017;38(4):789-794. PubMed PMID: 28232495.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Benign Miliary Osteoma Cutis of the Face: A Common Incidental CT Finding. AU - Kim,D, AU - Franco,G A, AU - Shigehara,H, AU - Asaumi,J, AU - Hildenbrand,P, Y1 - 2017/02/23/ PY - 2016/09/06/received PY - 2016/12/06/accepted PY - 2017/2/25/pubmed PY - 2017/11/2/medline PY - 2017/2/25/entrez SP - 789 EP - 794 JF - AJNR. American journal of neuroradiology JO - AJNR Am J Neuroradiol VL - 38 IS - 4 N2 - BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Osteoma cutis of the face represents a primary or secondary formation of ossific foci in the facial skin. Its primary form has been sparsely described in the plastic surgery and dermatology literature. As radiologists, we routinely encounter incidental, very small facial calcified nodules on CT studies performed for a variety of unrelated reasons. We hypothesized that this routinely encountered facial calcification represents primary miliary osteoma cutis and is a common, benign, age-related finding. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We retrospectively reviewed 1315 consecutive sinus CTs obtained during an 8-month period and their associated demographics. The number of dermal radiopaque lesions with Hounsfield units of >150 was counted, and we analyzed the association between the prevalence of these lesions and patients' demographics with logistic regression methods. RESULTS: Five hundred ninety-nine males and 716 females from 4 to 90 years of age were included in the study (mean, 52 versus 51 years; P = .259). Among these, 252 males and 301 females had small facial calcified nodules (42.1% versus 42.0%, P = .971). The patient's age was a statistically significant predictor for having facial calcified nodules (odds ratio = 1.02, P < .001), while the patient's sex was not (P = .826). CONCLUSIONS: Facial calcified nodules, observed in routine head and face CT imaging, are common, benign, age-related findings, which have been largely overlooked in the radiology literature. It is a manifestation of primary miliary osteoma cutis. SN - 1936-959X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/28232495/Benign_Miliary_Osteoma_Cutis_of_the_Face:_A_Common_Incidental_CT_Finding_ L2 - http://www.ajnr.org/cgi/pmidlookup?view=long&amp;pmid=28232495 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -