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Mimivirus: leading the way in the discovery of giant viruses of amoebae.
Nat Rev Microbiol. 2017 04; 15(4):243-254.NR

Abstract

The accidental discovery of the giant virus of amoeba - Acanthamoeba polyphaga mimivirus (APMV; more commonly known as mimivirus) - in 2003 changed the field of virology. Viruses were previously defined by their submicroscopic size, which probably prevented the search for giant viruses, which are visible by light microscopy. Extended studies of giant viruses of amoebae revealed that they have genetic, proteomic and structural complexities that were not thought to exist among viruses and that are comparable to those of bacteria, archaea and small eukaryotes. The giant virus particles contain mRNA and more than 100 proteins, they have gene repertoires that are broader than those of other viruses and, notably, some encode translation components. The infection cycles of giant viruses of amoebae involve virus entry by amoebal phagocytosis and replication in viral factories. In addition, mimiviruses are infected by virophages, defend against them through the mimivirus virophage resistance element (MIMIVIRE) system and have a unique mobilome. Overall, giant viruses of amoebae, including mimiviruses, marseilleviruses, pandoraviruses, pithoviruses, faustoviruses and molliviruses, challenge the definition and classification of viruses, and have increasingly been detected in humans.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Unité de Recherche sur les Maladies Infectieuses et Tropicales Emergentes (URMITE), Aix-Marseille University, UM63, CNRS 7278, IRD 198, INSERM 1095, Institut Hospitalo-Universitaire (IHU) - Méditerranée Infection, AP-HM, 19-21 Boulevard Jean Moulin, 13385 Marseille, France.Unité de Recherche sur les Maladies Infectieuses et Tropicales Emergentes (URMITE), Aix-Marseille University, UM63, CNRS 7278, IRD 198, INSERM 1095, Institut Hospitalo-Universitaire (IHU) - Méditerranée Infection, AP-HM, 19-21 Boulevard Jean Moulin, 13385 Marseille, France.Unité de Recherche sur les Maladies Infectieuses et Tropicales Emergentes (URMITE), Aix-Marseille University, UM63, CNRS 7278, IRD 198, INSERM 1095, Institut Hospitalo-Universitaire (IHU) - Méditerranée Infection, AP-HM, 19-21 Boulevard Jean Moulin, 13385 Marseille, France.Evolutionary Bioinformatics Laboratory, Department of Crop Sciences, University of Illinois, 332 National Soybean Research Center, 1101 West Peabody Drive, Urbana, Illinois 61801, USA.Unité de Recherche sur les Maladies Infectieuses et Tropicales Emergentes (URMITE), Aix-Marseille University, UM63, CNRS 7278, IRD 198, INSERM 1095, Institut Hospitalo-Universitaire (IHU) - Méditerranée Infection, AP-HM, 19-21 Boulevard Jean Moulin, 13385 Marseille, France.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

28239153

Citation

Colson, Philippe, et al. "Mimivirus: Leading the Way in the Discovery of Giant Viruses of Amoebae." Nature Reviews. Microbiology, vol. 15, no. 4, 2017, pp. 243-254.
Colson P, La Scola B, Levasseur A, et al. Mimivirus: leading the way in the discovery of giant viruses of amoebae. Nat Rev Microbiol. 2017;15(4):243-254.
Colson, P., La Scola, B., Levasseur, A., Caetano-Anollés, G., & Raoult, D. (2017). Mimivirus: leading the way in the discovery of giant viruses of amoebae. Nature Reviews. Microbiology, 15(4), 243-254. https://doi.org/10.1038/nrmicro.2016.197
Colson P, et al. Mimivirus: Leading the Way in the Discovery of Giant Viruses of Amoebae. Nat Rev Microbiol. 2017;15(4):243-254. PubMed PMID: 28239153.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Mimivirus: leading the way in the discovery of giant viruses of amoebae. AU - Colson,Philippe, AU - La Scola,Bernard, AU - Levasseur,Anthony, AU - Caetano-Anollés,Gustavo, AU - Raoult,Didier, Y1 - 2017/02/27/ PY - 2017/2/28/pubmed PY - 2017/5/24/medline PY - 2017/2/28/entrez SP - 243 EP - 254 JF - Nature reviews. Microbiology JO - Nat Rev Microbiol VL - 15 IS - 4 N2 - The accidental discovery of the giant virus of amoeba - Acanthamoeba polyphaga mimivirus (APMV; more commonly known as mimivirus) - in 2003 changed the field of virology. Viruses were previously defined by their submicroscopic size, which probably prevented the search for giant viruses, which are visible by light microscopy. Extended studies of giant viruses of amoebae revealed that they have genetic, proteomic and structural complexities that were not thought to exist among viruses and that are comparable to those of bacteria, archaea and small eukaryotes. The giant virus particles contain mRNA and more than 100 proteins, they have gene repertoires that are broader than those of other viruses and, notably, some encode translation components. The infection cycles of giant viruses of amoebae involve virus entry by amoebal phagocytosis and replication in viral factories. In addition, mimiviruses are infected by virophages, defend against them through the mimivirus virophage resistance element (MIMIVIRE) system and have a unique mobilome. Overall, giant viruses of amoebae, including mimiviruses, marseilleviruses, pandoraviruses, pithoviruses, faustoviruses and molliviruses, challenge the definition and classification of viruses, and have increasingly been detected in humans. SN - 1740-1534 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/28239153/Mimivirus:_leading_the_way_in_the_discovery_of_giant_viruses_of_amoebae_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1038/nrmicro.2016.197 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -