Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Association between Dietary Sodium Intake and Cognitive Function in Older Adults.
J Nutr Health Aging. 2017; 21(3):276-283.JN

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To examine the association of dietary sodium intake with cognitive function in community-dwelling older adults.

DESIGN

Cross-sectional study.

SETTING

Southern California community.

PARTICIPANTS

White men (n=373) and women (n=552), aged 50-96 years from the Rancho Bernardo Study, a longitudinal study of cardiovascular disease risk factors and healthy aging.

MEASUREMENTS

During the 1992-1996 research clinic visit, a food frequency questionnaire was used to determine daily sodium intake; cognitive function was assessed with Trails Making Test, part B (Trails B), Mini-Mental State Exam (MMSE), and Verbal Fluency Test (VFT); and medical, clinical and demographic information was obtained. Linear regression was used to assess the association between calorie-adjusted sodium intake and cognitive test scores with adjustment for demographic, behavioral and health measures. Logistic regression examined the odds of having cognitive impairment by sodium intake.

RESULTS

Lower sodium intake was associated with poorer performance on Trails B (p=0.008) and MMSE (p=0.003) after controlling for age, sex, and education. Associations did not differ by sex, but there was a significant interaction by age for the Trails B: older (≥80 years), but not younger, adults showed worse performance with lower sodium intake (p=0.03). Associations remained significant after additional adjustment for smoking, alcohol intake, exercise, body weight, cardiovascular risk factors, kidney function, diuretic medication use, and diet quality. Lower daily sodium intake was associated with increased odds of cognitive impairment on the MMSE (score < 26; OR per SD decrease = 1.12, 95% CI 1.08, 1.16). Concluson: Lower sodium intake was associated with worse cognitive function in older community-dwelling adults. For the maintenance of cognitive health, older adults may be advised to avoid very low sodium diets.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Toni Rush, MPH, University of California, San Diego, 9500 Gilman Dr MC 0725, La Jolla, CA 92093. E-mail: tmrush@ucsd.edu. Phone: 619-246-6561.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

28244567

Citation

Rush, T M., et al. "Association Between Dietary Sodium Intake and Cognitive Function in Older Adults." The Journal of Nutrition, Health & Aging, vol. 21, no. 3, 2017, pp. 276-283.
Rush TM, Kritz-Silverstein D, Laughlin GA, et al. Association between Dietary Sodium Intake and Cognitive Function in Older Adults. J Nutr Health Aging. 2017;21(3):276-283.
Rush, T. M., Kritz-Silverstein, D., Laughlin, G. A., Fung, T. T., Barrett-Connor, E., & McEvoy, L. K. (2017). Association between Dietary Sodium Intake and Cognitive Function in Older Adults. The Journal of Nutrition, Health & Aging, 21(3), 276-283. https://doi.org/10.1007/s12603-016-0766-2
Rush TM, et al. Association Between Dietary Sodium Intake and Cognitive Function in Older Adults. J Nutr Health Aging. 2017;21(3):276-283. PubMed PMID: 28244567.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Association between Dietary Sodium Intake and Cognitive Function in Older Adults. AU - Rush,T M, AU - Kritz-Silverstein,D, AU - Laughlin,G A, AU - Fung,T T, AU - Barrett-Connor,E, AU - McEvoy,L K, PY - 2017/3/1/entrez PY - 2017/3/1/pubmed PY - 2017/9/8/medline KW - Sodium KW - aging KW - cognitive function KW - diet SP - 276 EP - 283 JF - The journal of nutrition, health & aging JO - J Nutr Health Aging VL - 21 IS - 3 N2 - OBJECTIVE: To examine the association of dietary sodium intake with cognitive function in community-dwelling older adults. DESIGN: Cross-sectional study. SETTING: Southern California community. PARTICIPANTS: White men (n=373) and women (n=552), aged 50-96 years from the Rancho Bernardo Study, a longitudinal study of cardiovascular disease risk factors and healthy aging. MEASUREMENTS: During the 1992-1996 research clinic visit, a food frequency questionnaire was used to determine daily sodium intake; cognitive function was assessed with Trails Making Test, part B (Trails B), Mini-Mental State Exam (MMSE), and Verbal Fluency Test (VFT); and medical, clinical and demographic information was obtained. Linear regression was used to assess the association between calorie-adjusted sodium intake and cognitive test scores with adjustment for demographic, behavioral and health measures. Logistic regression examined the odds of having cognitive impairment by sodium intake. RESULTS: Lower sodium intake was associated with poorer performance on Trails B (p=0.008) and MMSE (p=0.003) after controlling for age, sex, and education. Associations did not differ by sex, but there was a significant interaction by age for the Trails B: older (≥80 years), but not younger, adults showed worse performance with lower sodium intake (p=0.03). Associations remained significant after additional adjustment for smoking, alcohol intake, exercise, body weight, cardiovascular risk factors, kidney function, diuretic medication use, and diet quality. Lower daily sodium intake was associated with increased odds of cognitive impairment on the MMSE (score < 26; OR per SD decrease = 1.12, 95% CI 1.08, 1.16). Concluson: Lower sodium intake was associated with worse cognitive function in older community-dwelling adults. For the maintenance of cognitive health, older adults may be advised to avoid very low sodium diets. SN - 1760-4788 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/28244567/Association_between_Dietary_Sodium_Intake_and_Cognitive_Function_in_Older_Adults_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1007/s12603-016-0766-2 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -