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Association of dietary vitamin E intake with risk of lung cancer: a dose-response meta-analysis.
Asia Pac J Clin Nutr 2017; 26(2):271-277AP

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES

Several epidemiological studies investigating the association between dietary vitamin E intake and the risk of lung cancer have demonstrated inconsistent results. Hence, a meta-analysis was conducted to summarise evidence of the association of dietary vitamin E intake with the risk of lung cancer.

METHODS AND STUDY DESIGN

In this meta-analysis, a systematic literature search of PubMed and Web of Science was conducted to identify relevant studies published from 1955 to April 2015. If p<0.05 or I2 >50%, a random effect model was used to estimate overall relative risks (RRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Otherwise, a fixed effect model was applied. Publication bias was estimated using the funnel plot and Egger's test. The doseresponse relationship was assessed using the method of restricted cubic splines with 4 knots at percentiles 5, 35, 65, and 95 of the distribution.

RESULTS

The pooled RR of lung cancer for the highest versus lowest categories of dietary vitamin E intake was 0.84 (95% CI=0.76-0.93). With every 2 mg/d increase in dietary vitamin E intake, the risk of lung cancer statistically decreased by 5% (RR=0.95, 95% CI =0.91-0.99, plinearity=0.0237).

CONCLUSIONS

Our analysis suggests that higher dietary vitamin E intake exerts a protective effect against lung cancer.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Cardiology, the First Affiliated Hospital of Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou, Henan, China.Department of Nutrition and Food Hygiene, College of Public Health, Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou, Henan, China.Department of Nutrition and Food Hygiene, College of Public Health, Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou, Henan, China.Department of Cardiology, the First Affiliated Hospital of Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou, Henan, China. Email: qiu_contribution@163.com.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Meta-Analysis

Language

eng

PubMed ID

28244705

Citation

Zhu, Yong-Jian, et al. "Association of Dietary Vitamin E Intake With Risk of Lung Cancer: a Dose-response Meta-analysis." Asia Pacific Journal of Clinical Nutrition, vol. 26, no. 2, 2017, pp. 271-277.
Zhu YJ, Bo YC, Liu XX, et al. Association of dietary vitamin E intake with risk of lung cancer: a dose-response meta-analysis. Asia Pac J Clin Nutr. 2017;26(2):271-277.
Zhu, Y. J., Bo, Y. C., Liu, X. X., & Qiu, C. G. (2017). Association of dietary vitamin E intake with risk of lung cancer: a dose-response meta-analysis. Asia Pacific Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 26(2), pp. 271-277. doi:10.6133/apjcn.032016.04.
Zhu YJ, et al. Association of Dietary Vitamin E Intake With Risk of Lung Cancer: a Dose-response Meta-analysis. Asia Pac J Clin Nutr. 2017;26(2):271-277. PubMed PMID: 28244705.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Association of dietary vitamin E intake with risk of lung cancer: a dose-response meta-analysis. AU - Zhu,Yong-Jian, AU - Bo,Ya-Cong, AU - Liu,Xin-Xin, AU - Qiu,Chun-Guang, PY - 2017/3/1/entrez PY - 2017/3/1/pubmed PY - 2017/7/1/medline SP - 271 EP - 277 JF - Asia Pacific journal of clinical nutrition JO - Asia Pac J Clin Nutr VL - 26 IS - 2 N2 - BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Several epidemiological studies investigating the association between dietary vitamin E intake and the risk of lung cancer have demonstrated inconsistent results. Hence, a meta-analysis was conducted to summarise evidence of the association of dietary vitamin E intake with the risk of lung cancer. METHODS AND STUDY DESIGN: In this meta-analysis, a systematic literature search of PubMed and Web of Science was conducted to identify relevant studies published from 1955 to April 2015. If p<0.05 or I2 >50%, a random effect model was used to estimate overall relative risks (RRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Otherwise, a fixed effect model was applied. Publication bias was estimated using the funnel plot and Egger's test. The doseresponse relationship was assessed using the method of restricted cubic splines with 4 knots at percentiles 5, 35, 65, and 95 of the distribution. RESULTS: The pooled RR of lung cancer for the highest versus lowest categories of dietary vitamin E intake was 0.84 (95% CI=0.76-0.93). With every 2 mg/d increase in dietary vitamin E intake, the risk of lung cancer statistically decreased by 5% (RR=0.95, 95% CI =0.91-0.99, plinearity=0.0237). CONCLUSIONS: Our analysis suggests that higher dietary vitamin E intake exerts a protective effect against lung cancer. SN - 0964-7058 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/28244705/Association_of_dietary_vitamin_E_intake_with_risk_of_lung_cancer:_a_dose_response_meta_analysis_ L2 - http://apjcn.nhri.org.tw/server/APJCN/26/2/271.pdf DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -