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Dietary Patterns and Risk of Colorectal Cancer: Analysis by Tumor Location and Molecular Subtypes.
Gastroenterology. 2017 06; 152(8):1944-1953.e1.G

Abstract

BACKGROUND & AIMS

Western and prudent dietary patterns have been associated with higher and lower risks of colorectal cancer (CRC), respectively. However, little is known about the associations between dietary patterns and specific anatomic subsites or molecular subtypes of CRC.

METHODS

We used multivariable Cox proportional hazards models to examine the associations between Western and prudent dietary patterns and CRC risk in the Health Professionals Follow-up Study and Nurses' Health Study.

RESULTS

After up to 32 years of follow-up of 137,217 men and women, we documented 3260 cases of CRC. Among individuals from whom subsite data were available, we observed 1264 proximal colon, 866 distal colon, and 670 rectal tumors. Western diet was associated with an increased incidence of CRC (Ptrend < .0001), with a relative risk (RR) of 1.31 (95% CI, 1.15-1.48, comparing the highest to lowest quartile). The association of Western diet with CRC was evident for tumors of the distal colon (RR, 1.55; 95% CI, 1.22-1.96; Ptrend = .0004) and rectum (RR, 1.35; 95% CI, 1.03-1.77; Ptrend = .01) but not proximal colon (RR, 1.11; 95% CI, 0.91-1.35; Ptrend = .51) when we comparing extreme quartiles. In contrast, for the prudent pattern, we observed a RR of 0.86 for overall CRC (95% CI, 0.77-0.95; Ptrend = .01), with similar trends at anatomic subsites. However, the trend appeared stronger among men than women. Among 1285 cases (39%) with tissue available for molecular profiling, Western diet appeared to be more strongly associated with some CRC molecular subtypes (no mutations in KRAS [KRAS wildtype] or BRAF [BRAF wildtype], no or a low CpG island methylator phenotype, and microsatellite stability), although formal tests for heterogeneity did not produce statistically significant results.

CONCLUSIONS

Western dietary patterns are associated with an increased risk of CRC, particularly distal colon and rectal tumors. Western dietary patterns also appear more strongly associated with tumors that are KRAS wildtype, BRAF wildtype, have no or a low CpG island methylator phenotype, and microsatellite stability. In contrast, prudent dietary patterns are associated with a lower risk of CRC that does not vary according to anatomic subsite or molecular subtype.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Clinical and Translational Epidemiology Unit, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts; Division of Gastroenterology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts.Clinical and Translational Epidemiology Unit, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts; Division of Gastroenterology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts; Department of Nutrition, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts.Division of MPE Molecular Pathological Epidemiology, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts; Broad Institute of Massachusetts Institute of Technology and Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts; Department of Nutrition, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts; Department of Epidemiology, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts; Department of Biostatistics, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts; Department of Oncologic Pathology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts.Clinical and Translational Epidemiology Unit, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts; Division of Gastroenterology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts.Department of Nutrition, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts.Department of Oncologic Pathology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts.Program in Dietetics, Simmons College, Boston, Massachusetts.Department of Oncologic Pathology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts.Department of Oncologic Pathology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts.Department of Oncologic Pathology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts.Department of Oncologic Pathology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts.Department of Oncologic Pathology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts.Department of Oncologic Pathology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts.Channing Division of Network Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts; Department of Nutrition, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts.Channing Division of Network Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts; Department of Oncologic Pathology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts; Yale Cancer Center, Smilow Cancer Hospital and Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut.Channing Division of Network Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts; Department of Nutrition, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts; Department of Epidemiology, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts.Division of MPE Molecular Pathological Epidemiology, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts; Department of Epidemiology, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts; Department of Oncologic Pathology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts. Electronic address: shuji_ogino@dfci.harvard.edu.Clinical and Translational Epidemiology Unit, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts; Division of Gastroenterology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts; Channing Division of Network Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts; Broad Institute of Massachusetts Institute of Technology and Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts. Electronic address: achan@mgh.harvard.edu.

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

28249812

Citation

Mehta, Raaj S., et al. "Dietary Patterns and Risk of Colorectal Cancer: Analysis By Tumor Location and Molecular Subtypes." Gastroenterology, vol. 152, no. 8, 2017, pp. 1944-1953.e1.
Mehta RS, Song M, Nishihara R, et al. Dietary Patterns and Risk of Colorectal Cancer: Analysis by Tumor Location and Molecular Subtypes. Gastroenterology. 2017;152(8):1944-1953.e1.
Mehta, R. S., Song, M., Nishihara, R., Drew, D. A., Wu, K., Qian, Z. R., Fung, T. T., Hamada, T., Masugi, Y., da Silva, A., Shi, Y., Li, W., Gu, M., Willett, W. C., Fuchs, C. S., Giovannucci, E. L., Ogino, S., & Chan, A. T. (2017). Dietary Patterns and Risk of Colorectal Cancer: Analysis by Tumor Location and Molecular Subtypes. Gastroenterology, 152(8), 1944-e1. https://doi.org/10.1053/j.gastro.2017.02.015
Mehta RS, et al. Dietary Patterns and Risk of Colorectal Cancer: Analysis By Tumor Location and Molecular Subtypes. Gastroenterology. 2017;152(8):1944-1953.e1. PubMed PMID: 28249812.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Dietary Patterns and Risk of Colorectal Cancer: Analysis by Tumor Location and Molecular Subtypes. AU - Mehta,Raaj S, AU - Song,Mingyang, AU - Nishihara,Reiko, AU - Drew,David A, AU - Wu,Kana, AU - Qian,Zhi Rong, AU - Fung,Teresa T, AU - Hamada,Tsuyoshi, AU - Masugi,Yohei, AU - da Silva,Annacarolina, AU - Shi,Yan, AU - Li,Wanwan, AU - Gu,Mancang, AU - Willett,Walter C, AU - Fuchs,Charles S, AU - Giovannucci,Edward L, AU - Ogino,Shuji, AU - Chan,Andrew T, Y1 - 2017/02/27/ PY - 2016/11/05/received PY - 2017/02/09/revised PY - 2017/02/20/accepted PY - 2017/3/3/pubmed PY - 2017/8/15/medline PY - 2017/3/3/entrez KW - Colon Cancer Risk KW - Molecular Epidemiology KW - Processed Meat KW - Red Meat SP - 1944 EP - 1953.e1 JF - Gastroenterology JO - Gastroenterology VL - 152 IS - 8 N2 - BACKGROUND & AIMS: Western and prudent dietary patterns have been associated with higher and lower risks of colorectal cancer (CRC), respectively. However, little is known about the associations between dietary patterns and specific anatomic subsites or molecular subtypes of CRC. METHODS: We used multivariable Cox proportional hazards models to examine the associations between Western and prudent dietary patterns and CRC risk in the Health Professionals Follow-up Study and Nurses' Health Study. RESULTS: After up to 32 years of follow-up of 137,217 men and women, we documented 3260 cases of CRC. Among individuals from whom subsite data were available, we observed 1264 proximal colon, 866 distal colon, and 670 rectal tumors. Western diet was associated with an increased incidence of CRC (Ptrend < .0001), with a relative risk (RR) of 1.31 (95% CI, 1.15-1.48, comparing the highest to lowest quartile). The association of Western diet with CRC was evident for tumors of the distal colon (RR, 1.55; 95% CI, 1.22-1.96; Ptrend = .0004) and rectum (RR, 1.35; 95% CI, 1.03-1.77; Ptrend = .01) but not proximal colon (RR, 1.11; 95% CI, 0.91-1.35; Ptrend = .51) when we comparing extreme quartiles. In contrast, for the prudent pattern, we observed a RR of 0.86 for overall CRC (95% CI, 0.77-0.95; Ptrend = .01), with similar trends at anatomic subsites. However, the trend appeared stronger among men than women. Among 1285 cases (39%) with tissue available for molecular profiling, Western diet appeared to be more strongly associated with some CRC molecular subtypes (no mutations in KRAS [KRAS wildtype] or BRAF [BRAF wildtype], no or a low CpG island methylator phenotype, and microsatellite stability), although formal tests for heterogeneity did not produce statistically significant results. CONCLUSIONS: Western dietary patterns are associated with an increased risk of CRC, particularly distal colon and rectal tumors. Western dietary patterns also appear more strongly associated with tumors that are KRAS wildtype, BRAF wildtype, have no or a low CpG island methylator phenotype, and microsatellite stability. In contrast, prudent dietary patterns are associated with a lower risk of CRC that does not vary according to anatomic subsite or molecular subtype. SN - 1528-0012 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/28249812/Dietary_Patterns_and_Risk_of_Colorectal_Cancer:_Analysis_by_Tumor_Location_and_Molecular_Subtypes_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0016-5085(17)30179-8 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -