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Cortical features of distinct developmental trajectories in patients with delusional infestation.

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Although there is strong neuroimaging evidence that cortical alterations are a core feature of schizophrenia spectrum disorders, it still remains unclear to what extent such abnormalities occur in monothematic delusional disorders. In individuals with delusional infestation (DI), the delusional belief to be infested with pathogens, previous structural MRI studies have shown prefrontal, temporal, parietal, insular, thalamic and striatal gray matter volume changes. Differential contributions of cortical features of evolutionary and genetic origin (such as cortical thickness, area and folding) which may distinctly contribute to DI pathophysiology are unclear at present.

METHODS

In this study, 18 patients with DI and 20 healthy controls (HC) underwent MRI scanning at 1.0T. Using surface-based analyses we calculated cortical thickness, surface area and local gyrification index (LGI). Whole-brain differences between patients and controls were investigated.

RESULTS

Surface analyses revealed frontoparietal patterns exhibiting altered cortical thickness, surface area and LGI in DI patients compared to controls. Higher cortical thickness was found in the right medial orbitofrontal cortex (p<0.05, cluster-wise probability [CWP] corrected). Smaller surface area in patients was found in the left inferior temporal gyrus, the precuneus, the pars orbitalis of the right frontal gyrus, and the lingual gyrus (p<0.05, CWP corr.). Lower LGI was found in the left postcentral, bilateral precentral, right middle temporal, inferior parietal, and superior parietal gyri (p<0.01, CWP corr.).

CONCLUSION

This study lends further support to the hypothesis that cortical features of distinct evolutionary and genetic origin differently contribute to the pathogenesis of delusional disorders. Regions in which atrophy was observed are part of neural circuits associated with perception, visuospatial control and self-awareness. The data are in line with the notion of a content-specific neural signature of DI.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, Central Institute of Mental Health, Medical Faculty Mannheim, Heidelberg University Mannheim, Germany. Electronic address: dusan.hirjak@zi-mannheim.de.Department of Psychiatry, General Hospital Bruneck, South Tyrol, Italy.Department of Psychiatry, General Hospital Bruneck, South Tyrol, Italy.Center for Psychosocial Medicine, Department of General Psychiatry, Heidelberg University, Germany.Department of Radiology, General Hospital Bruneck, South Tyrol, Italy.Department of Experimental and Clinical Medical Sciences, Udine University, Italy.Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy III, University of Ulm, Ulm, Germany.Center for Psychosocial Medicine, Department of General Psychiatry, Heidelberg University, Germany.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

28257853

Citation

Hirjak, Dusan, et al. "Cortical Features of Distinct Developmental Trajectories in Patients With Delusional Infestation." Progress in Neuro-psychopharmacology & Biological Psychiatry, vol. 76, 2017, pp. 72-79.
Hirjak D, Huber M, Kirchler E, et al. Cortical features of distinct developmental trajectories in patients with delusional infestation. Prog Neuropsychopharmacol Biol Psychiatry. 2017;76:72-79.
Hirjak, D., Huber, M., Kirchler, E., Kubera, K. M., Karner, M., Sambataro, F., ... Wolf, R. C. (2017). Cortical features of distinct developmental trajectories in patients with delusional infestation. Progress in Neuro-psychopharmacology & Biological Psychiatry, 76, pp. 72-79. doi:10.1016/j.pnpbp.2017.02.018.
Hirjak D, et al. Cortical Features of Distinct Developmental Trajectories in Patients With Delusional Infestation. Prog Neuropsychopharmacol Biol Psychiatry. 2017 06 2;76:72-79. PubMed PMID: 28257853.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Cortical features of distinct developmental trajectories in patients with delusional infestation. AU - Hirjak,Dusan, AU - Huber,Markus, AU - Kirchler,Erwin, AU - Kubera,Katharina M, AU - Karner,Martin, AU - Sambataro,Fabio, AU - Freudenmann,Roland W, AU - Wolf,Robert C, Y1 - 2017/02/28/ PY - 2016/12/21/received PY - 2017/02/23/revised PY - 2017/02/27/accepted PY - 2017/3/5/pubmed PY - 2018/4/3/medline PY - 2017/3/5/entrez KW - Cortical thickness KW - Delusional infestation KW - Freesurfer KW - Gyrification KW - MRI KW - Surface area SP - 72 EP - 79 JF - Progress in neuro-psychopharmacology & biological psychiatry JO - Prog. Neuropsychopharmacol. Biol. Psychiatry VL - 76 N2 - BACKGROUND: Although there is strong neuroimaging evidence that cortical alterations are a core feature of schizophrenia spectrum disorders, it still remains unclear to what extent such abnormalities occur in monothematic delusional disorders. In individuals with delusional infestation (DI), the delusional belief to be infested with pathogens, previous structural MRI studies have shown prefrontal, temporal, parietal, insular, thalamic and striatal gray matter volume changes. Differential contributions of cortical features of evolutionary and genetic origin (such as cortical thickness, area and folding) which may distinctly contribute to DI pathophysiology are unclear at present. METHODS: In this study, 18 patients with DI and 20 healthy controls (HC) underwent MRI scanning at 1.0T. Using surface-based analyses we calculated cortical thickness, surface area and local gyrification index (LGI). Whole-brain differences between patients and controls were investigated. RESULTS: Surface analyses revealed frontoparietal patterns exhibiting altered cortical thickness, surface area and LGI in DI patients compared to controls. Higher cortical thickness was found in the right medial orbitofrontal cortex (p<0.05, cluster-wise probability [CWP] corrected). Smaller surface area in patients was found in the left inferior temporal gyrus, the precuneus, the pars orbitalis of the right frontal gyrus, and the lingual gyrus (p<0.05, CWP corr.). Lower LGI was found in the left postcentral, bilateral precentral, right middle temporal, inferior parietal, and superior parietal gyri (p<0.01, CWP corr.). CONCLUSION: This study lends further support to the hypothesis that cortical features of distinct evolutionary and genetic origin differently contribute to the pathogenesis of delusional disorders. Regions in which atrophy was observed are part of neural circuits associated with perception, visuospatial control and self-awareness. The data are in line with the notion of a content-specific neural signature of DI. SN - 1878-4216 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/28257853/Cortical_features_of_distinct_developmental_trajectories_in_patients_with_delusional_infestation_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0278-5846(16)30455-9 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -