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Susceptibility to Food Advertisements and Sugar-Sweetened Beverage Intake in Non-Hispanic Black and Non-Hispanic White Adolescents.
J Community Health. 2017 Aug; 42(4):748-756.JC

Abstract

Obesity among adolescents in the United States has risen by 16% in the past 30 years. One important contributing factor may be the increased consumption of sugar sweetened beverages (SSBs), which is encouraged by advertisements for unhealthy foods and drinks that are targeted to adolescents. The purpose of this analysis was to determine the association between susceptibility to food and drink advertisements and sugar-sweetened beverage (SSB) consumption in non-Hispanic black (NHB) and non-Hispanic white (NHW) adolescents and to examine if BMI is associated with SSB consumption. Data were obtained from 765 NHB and NHW of ages 14-17 who were surveyed in the Family Life, Activity, Sun, Health, and Eating study sponsored by the National Cancer Institute. Two weighted adjusted logistic regression models were conducted. The first examined the associations of advertisement susceptibility, race, and BMI with SSB consumption. The second examined the associations of race and BMI with advertisement susceptibility. Adolescents with high advertisement susceptibility were more likely to consume at least one SSB daily (OR 1.73, 95% CI 1.21, 2.47). Additionally, non-Hispanic blacks were more likely to consume at least one SSB daily (OR 1.75, 95% CI 1.08, 2.85) and more likely to be highly susceptible to advertisements (OR 1.72, 95% CI 1.19, 2.48) than non-Hispanic whites. No significant associations were found between BMI and advertising susceptibility or BMI and daily SSB consumption. One approach to addressing the consumption of SSBs may be to reduce advertising that markets unhealthy food and beverages to adolescents and minorities.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Health and Kinesiology, Purdue University, 800 W. Stadium Avenue, West Lafayette, IN, 47907, USA.National Cancer Institute, 9609 Medical Center Drive, Rockville, MD, 20850-9761, USA. collinsta@mail.nih.gov.National Cancer Institute, 9609 Medical Center Drive, Rockville, MD, 20850-9761, USA.Department of Communication, Santa Clara University, 500 El Camino Real, Santa Clara, CA, 95053, USA.National Cancer Institute, 9609 Medical Center Drive, Rockville, MD, 20850-9761, USA.National Cancer Institute, 9609 Medical Center Drive, Rockville, MD, 20850-9761, USA.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

28260144

Citation

Cervi, Meredith M., et al. "Susceptibility to Food Advertisements and Sugar-Sweetened Beverage Intake in Non-Hispanic Black and Non-Hispanic White Adolescents." Journal of Community Health, vol. 42, no. 4, 2017, pp. 748-756.
Cervi MM, Agurs-Collins T, Dwyer LA, et al. Susceptibility to Food Advertisements and Sugar-Sweetened Beverage Intake in Non-Hispanic Black and Non-Hispanic White Adolescents. J Community Health. 2017;42(4):748-756.
Cervi, M. M., Agurs-Collins, T., Dwyer, L. A., Thai, C. L., Moser, R. P., & Nebeling, L. C. (2017). Susceptibility to Food Advertisements and Sugar-Sweetened Beverage Intake in Non-Hispanic Black and Non-Hispanic White Adolescents. Journal of Community Health, 42(4), 748-756. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10900-016-0313-4
Cervi MM, et al. Susceptibility to Food Advertisements and Sugar-Sweetened Beverage Intake in Non-Hispanic Black and Non-Hispanic White Adolescents. J Community Health. 2017;42(4):748-756. PubMed PMID: 28260144.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Susceptibility to Food Advertisements and Sugar-Sweetened Beverage Intake in Non-Hispanic Black and Non-Hispanic White Adolescents. AU - Cervi,Meredith M, AU - Agurs-Collins,Tanya, AU - Dwyer,Laura A, AU - Thai,Chan L, AU - Moser,Richard P, AU - Nebeling,Linda C, PY - 2017/3/6/pubmed PY - 2018/4/18/medline PY - 2017/3/6/entrez KW - Adolescents KW - Food advertising KW - Racial disparities KW - Sugar-sweetened beverages SP - 748 EP - 756 JF - Journal of community health JO - J Community Health VL - 42 IS - 4 N2 - Obesity among adolescents in the United States has risen by 16% in the past 30 years. One important contributing factor may be the increased consumption of sugar sweetened beverages (SSBs), which is encouraged by advertisements for unhealthy foods and drinks that are targeted to adolescents. The purpose of this analysis was to determine the association between susceptibility to food and drink advertisements and sugar-sweetened beverage (SSB) consumption in non-Hispanic black (NHB) and non-Hispanic white (NHW) adolescents and to examine if BMI is associated with SSB consumption. Data were obtained from 765 NHB and NHW of ages 14-17 who were surveyed in the Family Life, Activity, Sun, Health, and Eating study sponsored by the National Cancer Institute. Two weighted adjusted logistic regression models were conducted. The first examined the associations of advertisement susceptibility, race, and BMI with SSB consumption. The second examined the associations of race and BMI with advertisement susceptibility. Adolescents with high advertisement susceptibility were more likely to consume at least one SSB daily (OR 1.73, 95% CI 1.21, 2.47). Additionally, non-Hispanic blacks were more likely to consume at least one SSB daily (OR 1.75, 95% CI 1.08, 2.85) and more likely to be highly susceptible to advertisements (OR 1.72, 95% CI 1.19, 2.48) than non-Hispanic whites. No significant associations were found between BMI and advertising susceptibility or BMI and daily SSB consumption. One approach to addressing the consumption of SSBs may be to reduce advertising that markets unhealthy food and beverages to adolescents and minorities. SN - 1573-3610 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/28260144/Susceptibility_to_Food_Advertisements_and_Sugar_Sweetened_Beverage_Intake_in_Non_Hispanic_Black_and_Non_Hispanic_White_Adolescents_ L2 - https://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10900-016-0313-4 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -