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Dietary isoflavone intake and all-cause mortality in breast cancer survivors: The Breast Cancer Family Registry.
Cancer 2017; 123(11):2070-2079C

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Soy foods possess both antiestrogenic and estrogen-like properties. It remains controversial whether women diagnosed with breast cancer should be advised to eat more or less soy foods, especially for those who receive hormone therapies as part of cancer treatment.

METHODS

The association of dietary intake of isoflavone, the major phytoestrogen in soy, with all-cause mortality was examined in 6235 women with breast cancer enrolled in the Breast Cancer Family Registry. Dietary intake was assessed using a Food Frequency Questionnaire developed for the Hawaii-Los Angeles Multiethnic Cohort among 5178 women who reported prediagnosis diet and 1664 women who reported postdiagnosis diet. Cox proportional-hazard models were used to estimate hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs).

RESULTS

During a median follow-up of 113 months (approximately 9.4 years), 1224 deaths were documented. A 21% decrease was observed in all-cause mortality for women who had the highest versus lowest quartile of dietary isoflavone intake (≥1.5 vs < 0.3 mg daily: HR, 0.79; 95% confidence interval CI, 0.64-0.97; Ptrend = .01). Lower mortality associated with higher intake was limited to women who had tumors that were negative for hormone receptors (HR, 0.49; 95% CI, 0.29-0.83; Ptrend = .005) and those who did not receive hormone therapy for their breast cancer (HR, 0.68; 95% CI, 0.51-0.91; Ptrend = .02). Interactions, however, did not reach statistical significance.

CONCLUSIONS

In this large, ethnically diverse cohort of women with breast cancer living in North America, a higher dietary intake of isoflavone was associated with reduced all-cause mortality. Cancer 2017;123:2070-2079. © 2017 American Cancer Society.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy, Tufts University, Boston, Massachusetts.Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy, Tufts University, Boston, Massachusetts.Mailman School of Public Health, Columbia University, New York, New York.Lunenfeld-Tanenbaum Research Institute, Sinai Health System, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. Dalla Lana School of Public Health, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.Lunenfeld-Tanenbaum Research Institute, Sinai Health System, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. Dalla Lana School of Public Health, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.Clinical Genetics, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.Huntsman Cancer Institute at the University of Utah Health Sciences Center, Salt Lake City, Utah.Cancer Prevention Institute of California, Fremont, California. Department of Health Research and Policy (Epidemiology) and Stanford Cancer Institute, Stanford University of School of Medicine, Stanford, California.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

Language

eng

PubMed ID

28263368

Citation

Zhang, Fang Fang, et al. "Dietary Isoflavone Intake and All-cause Mortality in Breast Cancer Survivors: the Breast Cancer Family Registry." Cancer, vol. 123, no. 11, 2017, pp. 2070-2079.
Zhang FF, Haslam DE, Terry MB, et al. Dietary isoflavone intake and all-cause mortality in breast cancer survivors: The Breast Cancer Family Registry. Cancer. 2017;123(11):2070-2079.
Zhang, F. F., Haslam, D. E., Terry, M. B., Knight, J. A., Andrulis, I. L., Daly, M. B., ... John, E. M. (2017). Dietary isoflavone intake and all-cause mortality in breast cancer survivors: The Breast Cancer Family Registry. Cancer, 123(11), pp. 2070-2079. doi:10.1002/cncr.30615.
Zhang FF, et al. Dietary Isoflavone Intake and All-cause Mortality in Breast Cancer Survivors: the Breast Cancer Family Registry. Cancer. 2017 06 1;123(11):2070-2079. PubMed PMID: 28263368.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Dietary isoflavone intake and all-cause mortality in breast cancer survivors: The Breast Cancer Family Registry. AU - Zhang,Fang Fang, AU - Haslam,Danielle E, AU - Terry,Mary Beth, AU - Knight,Julia A, AU - Andrulis,Irene L, AU - Daly,Mary B, AU - Buys,Saundra S, AU - John,Esther M, Y1 - 2017/03/06/ PY - 2016/08/11/received PY - 2016/09/08/accepted PY - 2017/3/7/pubmed PY - 2017/8/22/medline PY - 2017/3/7/entrez KW - breast cancer KW - breast cancer survivors KW - isoflavone KW - mortality KW - soy KW - survival SP - 2070 EP - 2079 JF - Cancer JO - Cancer VL - 123 IS - 11 N2 - BACKGROUND: Soy foods possess both antiestrogenic and estrogen-like properties. It remains controversial whether women diagnosed with breast cancer should be advised to eat more or less soy foods, especially for those who receive hormone therapies as part of cancer treatment. METHODS: The association of dietary intake of isoflavone, the major phytoestrogen in soy, with all-cause mortality was examined in 6235 women with breast cancer enrolled in the Breast Cancer Family Registry. Dietary intake was assessed using a Food Frequency Questionnaire developed for the Hawaii-Los Angeles Multiethnic Cohort among 5178 women who reported prediagnosis diet and 1664 women who reported postdiagnosis diet. Cox proportional-hazard models were used to estimate hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). RESULTS: During a median follow-up of 113 months (approximately 9.4 years), 1224 deaths were documented. A 21% decrease was observed in all-cause mortality for women who had the highest versus lowest quartile of dietary isoflavone intake (≥1.5 vs < 0.3 mg daily: HR, 0.79; 95% confidence interval CI, 0.64-0.97; Ptrend = .01). Lower mortality associated with higher intake was limited to women who had tumors that were negative for hormone receptors (HR, 0.49; 95% CI, 0.29-0.83; Ptrend = .005) and those who did not receive hormone therapy for their breast cancer (HR, 0.68; 95% CI, 0.51-0.91; Ptrend = .02). Interactions, however, did not reach statistical significance. CONCLUSIONS: In this large, ethnically diverse cohort of women with breast cancer living in North America, a higher dietary intake of isoflavone was associated with reduced all-cause mortality. Cancer 2017;123:2070-2079. © 2017 American Cancer Society. SN - 1097-0142 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/28263368/Dietary_isoflavone_intake_and_all_cause_mortality_in_breast_cancer_survivors:_The_Breast_Cancer_Family_Registry_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1002/cncr.30615 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -