Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Psychosocial Risk and Protective Factors and Incident Mild Cognitive Impairment and Dementia in Community Dwelling Elderly: Findings from the Singapore Longitudinal Ageing Study.
J Alzheimers Dis. 2017; 57(2):603-611.JA

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Indicators of social isolation or support such as living alone, loneliness, being married, and life satisfaction are possible psychosocial risk and protective factors for dementia.

OBJECTIVE

We investigate the associations of these overlapping psychosocial factors with incident MCI-dementia (neurocognitive disorder) in a population cohort.

METHODS

Using data from 1601 participants of the Singapore Longitudinal Ageing Study (SLAS) who were free of MCI or dementia at baseline and followed up to 8 years, we estimated hazards ratio (HR) of association of living alone, loneliness, being married, and high life satisfaction with incident MCI-dementia.

RESULTS

In univariate analyses, individual HRs of association with incident MCI-dementia for living alone was 1.86 [1.18 - 2.95], (p = 0.008), loneliness was 1.26 [0.86 - 1.84], (p = 0.23), being married was 0.54 [0.39 - 0.75] (p < 0.0001), and being very satisfied with life was 0.59 [0.38-0.91]), (p = 0.017). Adjusted mutually for other psychosocial variables, and for age, sex, education, ethnicity, smoking, alcohol, dyslipidemia, hypertension, diabetes, central obesity, history of stroke or heart disease, APOE-ɛ4, depression, physical, social, and productive activities, only being married (0.68 [0.47-0.99], p = 0.044), and being very satisfied with life (0.61 [0.39 - 0.96], p = 0.034) remained significant variables associated with lower risks of developing MCI-dementia.

CONCLUSION

Individuals who were married and those who were very satisfied with life are protected against the risk of developing MCI and dementia. Controlling for the adverse effects of being without spousal support and low life satisfaction, living alone or a feeling of loneliness were not associated with increased risk of MCI-dementia.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Gerontology Research Programme, Department of Psychological Medicine, Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine, National University Health System, Singapore.Gerontology Research Programme, Department of Psychological Medicine, Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine, National University Health System, Singapore.Gerontology Research Programme, Department of Psychological Medicine, Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine, National University Health System, Singapore.Gerontology Research Programme, Department of Psychological Medicine, Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine, National University Health System, Singapore.Institute of Geriatrics and Active Ageing, Tan Tock Seng Hospital, Singapore. Department of Geriatric Medicine, Tan Tock Seng Hospital, Singapore.Institute of Geriatrics and Active Ageing, Tan Tock Seng Hospital, Singapore. Department of Geriatric Medicine, Tan Tock Seng Hospital, Singapore.Neurobehavioural Disorders Program, Duke-NUS Graduate Medical School, Singapore.Department of Geriatric Medicine, Khoo Teck Puat Hospital, Singapore. Geriatric Education and Research Institute, Alexandra Health System, Singapore.Department of Medicine, Ng Teng Fong General Hospital, Singapore.Gerontology Research Programme, Department of Psychological Medicine, Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine, National University Health System, Singapore. Geriatric Education and Research Institute, Alexandra Health System, Singapore.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

28269770

Citation

Rawtaer, Iris, et al. "Psychosocial Risk and Protective Factors and Incident Mild Cognitive Impairment and Dementia in Community Dwelling Elderly: Findings From the Singapore Longitudinal Ageing Study." Journal of Alzheimer's Disease : JAD, vol. 57, no. 2, 2017, pp. 603-611.
Rawtaer I, Gao Q, Nyunt MS, et al. Psychosocial Risk and Protective Factors and Incident Mild Cognitive Impairment and Dementia in Community Dwelling Elderly: Findings from the Singapore Longitudinal Ageing Study. J Alzheimers Dis. 2017;57(2):603-611.
Rawtaer, I., Gao, Q., Nyunt, M. S., Feng, L., Chong, M. S., Lim, W. S., Lee, T. S., Yap, P., Yap, K. B., & Ng, T. P. (2017). Psychosocial Risk and Protective Factors and Incident Mild Cognitive Impairment and Dementia in Community Dwelling Elderly: Findings from the Singapore Longitudinal Ageing Study. Journal of Alzheimer's Disease : JAD, 57(2), 603-611. https://doi.org/10.3233/JAD-160862
Rawtaer I, et al. Psychosocial Risk and Protective Factors and Incident Mild Cognitive Impairment and Dementia in Community Dwelling Elderly: Findings From the Singapore Longitudinal Ageing Study. J Alzheimers Dis. 2017;57(2):603-611. PubMed PMID: 28269770.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Psychosocial Risk and Protective Factors and Incident Mild Cognitive Impairment and Dementia in Community Dwelling Elderly: Findings from the Singapore Longitudinal Ageing Study. AU - Rawtaer,Iris, AU - Gao,Qi, AU - Nyunt,Ma Shwe Zin, AU - Feng,Lei, AU - Chong,Mei Sian, AU - Lim,Wee Shiong, AU - Lee,Tih-Shih, AU - Yap,Philip, AU - Yap,Keng Bee, AU - Ng,Tze Pin, PY - 2017/3/9/pubmed PY - 2018/2/27/medline PY - 2017/3/9/entrez KW - Dementia KW - epidemiology KW - living alone KW - protective factors KW - risk factors SP - 603 EP - 611 JF - Journal of Alzheimer's disease : JAD JO - J Alzheimers Dis VL - 57 IS - 2 N2 - BACKGROUND: Indicators of social isolation or support such as living alone, loneliness, being married, and life satisfaction are possible psychosocial risk and protective factors for dementia. OBJECTIVE: We investigate the associations of these overlapping psychosocial factors with incident MCI-dementia (neurocognitive disorder) in a population cohort. METHODS: Using data from 1601 participants of the Singapore Longitudinal Ageing Study (SLAS) who were free of MCI or dementia at baseline and followed up to 8 years, we estimated hazards ratio (HR) of association of living alone, loneliness, being married, and high life satisfaction with incident MCI-dementia. RESULTS: In univariate analyses, individual HRs of association with incident MCI-dementia for living alone was 1.86 [1.18 - 2.95], (p = 0.008), loneliness was 1.26 [0.86 - 1.84], (p = 0.23), being married was 0.54 [0.39 - 0.75] (p < 0.0001), and being very satisfied with life was 0.59 [0.38-0.91]), (p = 0.017). Adjusted mutually for other psychosocial variables, and for age, sex, education, ethnicity, smoking, alcohol, dyslipidemia, hypertension, diabetes, central obesity, history of stroke or heart disease, APOE-ɛ4, depression, physical, social, and productive activities, only being married (0.68 [0.47-0.99], p = 0.044), and being very satisfied with life (0.61 [0.39 - 0.96], p = 0.034) remained significant variables associated with lower risks of developing MCI-dementia. CONCLUSION: Individuals who were married and those who were very satisfied with life are protected against the risk of developing MCI and dementia. Controlling for the adverse effects of being without spousal support and low life satisfaction, living alone or a feeling of loneliness were not associated with increased risk of MCI-dementia. SN - 1875-8908 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/28269770/Psychosocial_Risk_and_Protective_Factors_and_Incident_Mild_Cognitive_Impairment_and_Dementia_in_Community_Dwelling_Elderly:_Findings_from_the_Singapore_Longitudinal_Ageing_Study_ L2 - https://content.iospress.com/openurl?genre=article&amp;id=doi:10.3233/JAD-160862 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -