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The influence of probiotics for preterm neonates on the incidence of atopic dermatitis-results from a historically controlled cohort study.
Arch Dermatol Res. 2017 May; 309(4):259-264.AD

Abstract

Probiotic supplementation is a promising preventive strategy for atopic dermatitis (AD). To help clarifying the significance of timing with respect to prevention of AD, we here evaluate the benefit of prophylactic use of probiotic supplementation in neonates younger than 30 weeks of gestation. Preterm children from the Department of Neonatology, Rigshospitalet, Denmark from two different admission periods were included in a historically controlled cohort study. Neonates from January 2007 to February 2010, not treated with and neonates from March 2010 to February 2013 treated with probiotic were enrolled. Main outcome was prevalence of AD, and secondary outcomes were use of topical corticosteroids, and number of skin-related visits to GPs and dermatologists. 527 preterm neonates were included in the study, 249 treated and 278 not treated with probiotics. Response rate for the two cohorts was 76.7 and 77.7% respectively. The prevalence of AD was similar in the two groups (20.9% in the probiotic treated group versus 17.1% in the not treated group, p = 0.33). No significant differences were found between the groups with respect to treatment with topical corticosteroids, or visits at GPs or dermatologist. We found no indication that probiotics may prevent AD when administered to neonates <30 gestation weeks from birth until discharge home. Factors influencing the early maturation of the immune system have been assumed to be of particular importance in atopic dermatitis, and hence, our unique cohorts contribute information on how probiotic supplementation may affect the extremely immature immune systems of preterm infants.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Pediatrics, University of Copenhagen, Herlev Hospital, 2730, Herlev, Denmark. julie.agner.damm@gmail.com.Department of Microbiology and Infection Control, Statens Serum Institute, 2300, Copenhagen S, Denmark.Department of Neonatology, Rigshospitalet, 2100, Copenhagen Ø, Denmark.Department of Microbiology and Infection Control, Statens Serum Institute, 2300, Copenhagen S, Denmark.Department of Dermatology, University of Copenhagen, Bispebjerg Hospital, 2400, Copenhagen NV, Denmark.Department of Dermatology, University of Copenhagen, Bispebjerg Hospital, 2400, Copenhagen NV, Denmark.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

28271213

Citation

Damm, Julie A., et al. "The Influence of Probiotics for Preterm Neonates On the Incidence of Atopic Dermatitis-results From a Historically Controlled Cohort Study." Archives of Dermatological Research, vol. 309, no. 4, 2017, pp. 259-264.
Damm JA, Smith B, Greisen G, et al. The influence of probiotics for preterm neonates on the incidence of atopic dermatitis-results from a historically controlled cohort study. Arch Dermatol Res. 2017;309(4):259-264.
Damm, J. A., Smith, B., Greisen, G., Krogfelt, K. A., Clausen, M. L., & Agner, T. (2017). The influence of probiotics for preterm neonates on the incidence of atopic dermatitis-results from a historically controlled cohort study. Archives of Dermatological Research, 309(4), 259-264. https://doi.org/10.1007/s00403-017-1725-4
Damm JA, et al. The Influence of Probiotics for Preterm Neonates On the Incidence of Atopic Dermatitis-results From a Historically Controlled Cohort Study. Arch Dermatol Res. 2017;309(4):259-264. PubMed PMID: 28271213.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - The influence of probiotics for preterm neonates on the incidence of atopic dermatitis-results from a historically controlled cohort study. AU - Damm,Julie A, AU - Smith,Birgitte, AU - Greisen,Gorm, AU - Krogfelt,Karen A, AU - Clausen,Maja-Lisa, AU - Agner,Tove, Y1 - 2017/03/07/ PY - 2016/10/24/received PY - 2017/02/14/accepted PY - 2017/02/05/revised PY - 2017/3/9/pubmed PY - 2017/4/22/medline PY - 2017/3/9/entrez KW - Atopic dermatitis KW - Neonates KW - Preterm KW - Probiotics SP - 259 EP - 264 JF - Archives of dermatological research JO - Arch. Dermatol. Res. VL - 309 IS - 4 N2 - Probiotic supplementation is a promising preventive strategy for atopic dermatitis (AD). To help clarifying the significance of timing with respect to prevention of AD, we here evaluate the benefit of prophylactic use of probiotic supplementation in neonates younger than 30 weeks of gestation. Preterm children from the Department of Neonatology, Rigshospitalet, Denmark from two different admission periods were included in a historically controlled cohort study. Neonates from January 2007 to February 2010, not treated with and neonates from March 2010 to February 2013 treated with probiotic were enrolled. Main outcome was prevalence of AD, and secondary outcomes were use of topical corticosteroids, and number of skin-related visits to GPs and dermatologists. 527 preterm neonates were included in the study, 249 treated and 278 not treated with probiotics. Response rate for the two cohorts was 76.7 and 77.7% respectively. The prevalence of AD was similar in the two groups (20.9% in the probiotic treated group versus 17.1% in the not treated group, p = 0.33). No significant differences were found between the groups with respect to treatment with topical corticosteroids, or visits at GPs or dermatologist. We found no indication that probiotics may prevent AD when administered to neonates <30 gestation weeks from birth until discharge home. Factors influencing the early maturation of the immune system have been assumed to be of particular importance in atopic dermatitis, and hence, our unique cohorts contribute information on how probiotic supplementation may affect the extremely immature immune systems of preterm infants. SN - 1432-069X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/28271213/The_influence_of_probiotics_for_preterm_neonates_on_the_incidence_of_atopic_dermatitis_results_from_a_historically_controlled_cohort_study_ L2 - https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s00403-017-1725-4 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -