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Entorhinal Cortex: Antemortem Cortical Thickness and Postmortem Neurofibrillary Tangles and Amyloid Pathology.
AJNR Am J Neuroradiol 2017; 38(5):961-965AA

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE

The entorhinal cortex, a critical gateway between the neocortex and hippocampus, is one of the earliest regions affected by Alzheimer disease-associated neurofibrillary tangle pathology. Although our prior work has automatically delineated an MR imaging-based measure of the entorhinal cortex, whether antemortem entorhinal cortex thickness is associated with postmortem tangle burden within the entorhinal cortex is still unknown. Our objective was to evaluate the relationship between antemortem MRI measures of entorhinal cortex thickness and postmortem neuropathological measures.

MATERIALS AND METHODS

We evaluated 50 participants from the Rush Memory and Aging Project with antemortem structural T1-weighted MR imaging and postmortem neuropathologic assessments. Here, we focused on thickness within the entorhinal cortex as anatomically defined by our previously developed MR imaging parcellation system (Desikan-Killiany Atlas in FreeSurfer). Using linear regression, we evaluated the association between entorhinal cortex thickness and tangles and amyloid-β load within the entorhinal cortex and medial temporal and neocortical regions.

RESULTS

We found a significant relationship between antemortem entorhinal cortex thickness and entorhinal cortex (P = .006) and medial temporal lobe tangles (P = .002); we found no relationship between entorhinal cortex thickness and entorhinal cortex (P = .09) and medial temporal lobe amyloid-β (P = .09). We also found a significant association between entorhinal cortex thickness and cortical tangles (P = .003) and amyloid-β (P = .01). We found no relationship between parahippocampal gyrus thickness and entorhinal cortex (P = .31) and medial temporal lobe tangles (P = .051).

CONCLUSIONS

Our findings indicate that entorhinal cortex-associated in vivo cortical thinning may represent a marker of postmortem medial temporal and neocortical Alzheimer disease pathology.

Authors+Show Affiliations

From the Department of Radiology (A.A.T.), University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, Colorado.Department of Radiology and Imaging Sciences (B.D.W.), Emory University Hospital, Atlanta, Georgia.Neuroradiology Section (W.P.D., C.P.H., R.S.D.), Department of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, California.Neuroradiology Section (W.P.D., C.P.H., R.S.D.), Department of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, California.Departments of Biostatistics (H.J.C.).Rush Alzheimer's Disease Center (D.A.F., S.E.L., D.A.B.), Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, Illinois.Rush Alzheimer's Disease Center (D.A.F., S.E.L., D.A.B.), Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, Illinois.Rush Alzheimer's Disease Center (D.A.F., S.E.L., D.A.B.), Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, Illinois.Department of Neurology (B.T.H.), Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts.Department of Neurology and Division of Cognitive Neurosciences (M.S.A.), Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland.Anatomy and Neurobiology (R.J.K.), Boston University School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts.Athinoula A. Martinos Center for Biomedical Imaging (B.F.), Department of Radiology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Charlestown, Massachusetts. Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory (B.F.), Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts.Departments of Radiology (A.M.D.), Cognitive Sciences and Neurosciences, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California.Neuroradiology Section (W.P.D., C.P.H., R.S.D.), Department of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, California rahul.desikan@ucsf.edu.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

28279988

Citation

Thaker, A A., et al. "Entorhinal Cortex: Antemortem Cortical Thickness and Postmortem Neurofibrillary Tangles and Amyloid Pathology." AJNR. American Journal of Neuroradiology, vol. 38, no. 5, 2017, pp. 961-965.
Thaker AA, Weinberg BD, Dillon WP, et al. Entorhinal Cortex: Antemortem Cortical Thickness and Postmortem Neurofibrillary Tangles and Amyloid Pathology. AJNR Am J Neuroradiol. 2017;38(5):961-965.
Thaker, A. A., Weinberg, B. D., Dillon, W. P., Hess, C. P., Cabral, H. J., Fleischman, D. A., ... Desikan, R. S. (2017). Entorhinal Cortex: Antemortem Cortical Thickness and Postmortem Neurofibrillary Tangles and Amyloid Pathology. AJNR. American Journal of Neuroradiology, 38(5), pp. 961-965. doi:10.3174/ajnr.A5133.
Thaker AA, et al. Entorhinal Cortex: Antemortem Cortical Thickness and Postmortem Neurofibrillary Tangles and Amyloid Pathology. AJNR Am J Neuroradiol. 2017;38(5):961-965. PubMed PMID: 28279988.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Entorhinal Cortex: Antemortem Cortical Thickness and Postmortem Neurofibrillary Tangles and Amyloid Pathology. AU - Thaker,A A, AU - Weinberg,B D, AU - Dillon,W P, AU - Hess,C P, AU - Cabral,H J, AU - Fleischman,D A, AU - Leurgans,S E, AU - Bennett,D A, AU - Hyman,B T, AU - Albert,M S, AU - Killiany,R J, AU - Fischl,B, AU - Dale,A M, AU - Desikan,R S, Y1 - 2017/03/09/ PY - 2016/06/13/received PY - 2017/01/10/accepted PY - 2017/3/11/pubmed PY - 2018/1/3/medline PY - 2017/3/11/entrez SP - 961 EP - 965 JF - AJNR. American journal of neuroradiology JO - AJNR Am J Neuroradiol VL - 38 IS - 5 N2 - BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: The entorhinal cortex, a critical gateway between the neocortex and hippocampus, is one of the earliest regions affected by Alzheimer disease-associated neurofibrillary tangle pathology. Although our prior work has automatically delineated an MR imaging-based measure of the entorhinal cortex, whether antemortem entorhinal cortex thickness is associated with postmortem tangle burden within the entorhinal cortex is still unknown. Our objective was to evaluate the relationship between antemortem MRI measures of entorhinal cortex thickness and postmortem neuropathological measures. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We evaluated 50 participants from the Rush Memory and Aging Project with antemortem structural T1-weighted MR imaging and postmortem neuropathologic assessments. Here, we focused on thickness within the entorhinal cortex as anatomically defined by our previously developed MR imaging parcellation system (Desikan-Killiany Atlas in FreeSurfer). Using linear regression, we evaluated the association between entorhinal cortex thickness and tangles and amyloid-β load within the entorhinal cortex and medial temporal and neocortical regions. RESULTS: We found a significant relationship between antemortem entorhinal cortex thickness and entorhinal cortex (P = .006) and medial temporal lobe tangles (P = .002); we found no relationship between entorhinal cortex thickness and entorhinal cortex (P = .09) and medial temporal lobe amyloid-β (P = .09). We also found a significant association between entorhinal cortex thickness and cortical tangles (P = .003) and amyloid-β (P = .01). We found no relationship between parahippocampal gyrus thickness and entorhinal cortex (P = .31) and medial temporal lobe tangles (P = .051). CONCLUSIONS: Our findings indicate that entorhinal cortex-associated in vivo cortical thinning may represent a marker of postmortem medial temporal and neocortical Alzheimer disease pathology. SN - 1936-959X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/28279988/Entorhinal_Cortex:_Antemortem_Cortical_Thickness_and_Postmortem_Neurofibrillary_Tangles_and_Amyloid_Pathology_ L2 - http://www.ajnr.org/cgi/pmidlookup?view=long&pmid=28279988 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -