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Root canal morphology and variations in mandibular second molar teeth of an Indian population: an in vivo cone-beam computed tomography analysis.
Clin Oral Investig. 2017 Dec; 21(9):2801-2809.CO

Abstract

OBJECTIVES

This study aims to investigate the root canal morphology of permanent mandibular second molars of an Indian population in vivo using cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) images.

METHODS

CBCT images (n = 983; males = 489, females = 494) of untreated, completely developed permanent mandibular second molar teeth were examined. CBCT scans were acquired as part of diagnosis and treatment planning for treatments unrelated to the present study. The number of roots and root canals were recorded. Canal configuration was classified based on Vertucci's and Fan's classifications.

RESULTS

The most common configuration was two-root (79.35%) and three-root canals (53.50%). The incidence of three-rooted molars was 7.53%, whereas 13.12% of the studied teeth studied have fused roots with C-shaped canals. The predominant canal morphology in the mesial roots was Vertucci's type IV (45.17%), followed by type II (32.55%), type I (7.23%), type V (1.02%), and type III (0.91%). The distal root in contrast showed type I (61.14%) as the predominant canal configuration, followed by type II (18.21%) and type IV (7.53%). The incidence of three-rooted molars was higher in males (n = 55; 5.59%) than in females (n = 19; 1.94%) (p < 0.01). The canals in the extra roots exhibited type I (100%) root canal morphology. In teeth with C-shaped root canal (13.12%), the variations in the coronal, middle, and apical third ranged from C1 to C4.

CONCLUSIONS

Root canal systems of the mesial roots of mandibular second molars of the study population demonstrated a high degree of variability. While three roots were rare, there was a sexual predisposition. Fused roots with C-shaped canals were rare and demonstrated significant variations from the coronal to apical third.

CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Root canal morphology can demonstrate variations based on race and sex of patients. Clinicians must always consider the possible variations to ensure successful endodontic treatment.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Conservative Dentistry and Endodontics, Nair Hospital Dental College, Mumbai, Maharashtra, India. ajinkya@drpawars.com.Department of Conservative Dentistry and Endodontics, Government Dental College and Hospital, Mumbai, Maharashtra, India.Department of Endodontology, The Goldschleger School of Dental Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv, Israel.Department of Conservative Dentistry and Endodontics, Terna Dental College and Hospital, Navi Mumbai, Maharashtra, India.Department of Oral Medicine and Radiology, Nair Hospital Dental College, Mumbai, Maharashtra, India.Department of Dentistry, Sir H N Reliance Foundation Hospital, Mumbai, Maharashtra, India.Discipline of Endodontics, Faculty of Dentistry, University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, Hong Kong.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

28281013

Citation

Pawar, Ajinkya Mansing, et al. "Root Canal Morphology and Variations in Mandibular Second Molar Teeth of an Indian Population: an in Vivo Cone-beam Computed Tomography Analysis." Clinical Oral Investigations, vol. 21, no. 9, 2017, pp. 2801-2809.
Pawar AM, Pawar M, Kfir A, et al. Root canal morphology and variations in mandibular second molar teeth of an Indian population: an in vivo cone-beam computed tomography analysis. Clin Oral Investig. 2017;21(9):2801-2809.
Pawar, A. M., Pawar, M., Kfir, A., Singh, S., Salve, P., Thakur, B., & Neelakantan, P. (2017). Root canal morphology and variations in mandibular second molar teeth of an Indian population: an in vivo cone-beam computed tomography analysis. Clinical Oral Investigations, 21(9), 2801-2809. https://doi.org/10.1007/s00784-017-2082-6
Pawar AM, et al. Root Canal Morphology and Variations in Mandibular Second Molar Teeth of an Indian Population: an in Vivo Cone-beam Computed Tomography Analysis. Clin Oral Investig. 2017;21(9):2801-2809. PubMed PMID: 28281013.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Root canal morphology and variations in mandibular second molar teeth of an Indian population: an in vivo cone-beam computed tomography analysis. AU - Pawar,Ajinkya Mansing, AU - Pawar,Mansing, AU - Kfir,Anda, AU - Singh,Shishir, AU - Salve,Prashant, AU - Thakur,Bhagyashree, AU - Neelakantan,Prasanna, Y1 - 2017/03/09/ PY - 2016/07/11/received PY - 2017/02/15/accepted PY - 2017/3/11/pubmed PY - 2018/8/15/medline PY - 2017/3/11/entrez KW - Anatomy KW - CBCT KW - Mandibular second molars KW - Morphology KW - Root canal SP - 2801 EP - 2809 JF - Clinical oral investigations JO - Clin Oral Investig VL - 21 IS - 9 N2 - OBJECTIVES: This study aims to investigate the root canal morphology of permanent mandibular second molars of an Indian population in vivo using cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) images. METHODS: CBCT images (n = 983; males = 489, females = 494) of untreated, completely developed permanent mandibular second molar teeth were examined. CBCT scans were acquired as part of diagnosis and treatment planning for treatments unrelated to the present study. The number of roots and root canals were recorded. Canal configuration was classified based on Vertucci's and Fan's classifications. RESULTS: The most common configuration was two-root (79.35%) and three-root canals (53.50%). The incidence of three-rooted molars was 7.53%, whereas 13.12% of the studied teeth studied have fused roots with C-shaped canals. The predominant canal morphology in the mesial roots was Vertucci's type IV (45.17%), followed by type II (32.55%), type I (7.23%), type V (1.02%), and type III (0.91%). The distal root in contrast showed type I (61.14%) as the predominant canal configuration, followed by type II (18.21%) and type IV (7.53%). The incidence of three-rooted molars was higher in males (n = 55; 5.59%) than in females (n = 19; 1.94%) (p < 0.01). The canals in the extra roots exhibited type I (100%) root canal morphology. In teeth with C-shaped root canal (13.12%), the variations in the coronal, middle, and apical third ranged from C1 to C4. CONCLUSIONS: Root canal systems of the mesial roots of mandibular second molars of the study population demonstrated a high degree of variability. While three roots were rare, there was a sexual predisposition. Fused roots with C-shaped canals were rare and demonstrated significant variations from the coronal to apical third. CLINICAL RELEVANCE: Root canal morphology can demonstrate variations based on race and sex of patients. Clinicians must always consider the possible variations to ensure successful endodontic treatment. SN - 1436-3771 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/28281013/Root_canal_morphology_and_variations_in_mandibular_second_molar_teeth_of_an_Indian_population:_an_in_vivo_cone_beam_computed_tomography_analysis_ L2 - https://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00784-017-2082-6 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -