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Dental anomalies: prevalence and associations between them in a large sample of non-orthodontic subjects, a cross-sectional study.
BMC Oral Health. 2017 Mar 11; 17(1):62.BO

Abstract

BACKGROUND

To analyze the prevalence and associations between dental anomalies detectable on panoramic radiographs in a sample of non-orthodontic growing subjects.

METHODS

For this cross-sectional study, digital panoramic radiographs of 5005 subjects were initially screened from a single radiographic center in Rome. Inclusion criteria were: subjects who were aged 8-12 years, Caucasian, and had good diagnostic quality radiographs. Syndromic subjects, those with craniofacial malformation, or orthodontic patients were excluded and this led to a sample of 4706 subjects [mean (SD) age = 9.6 (1.2) years, 2366 males and 2340 females]. Sample was subsequently divided into four subgroups (8, 9, 10, and 11-12 year-old groups). Two operators examined panoramic radiographs to observe the presence of common dental anomalies. The prevalence and associations between dental anomalies were also investigated.

RESULTS

The overall prevalence of dental anomalies was 20.9%. Approximately, 17.9% showed only one anomaly, 2.7% two anomalies, while only 0.3% had more than two anomalies. The most frequent anomalies were the displacement of maxillary canine (7.5%), hypodontia (7.1%), impacted teeth (3.9%), tooth ankylosis (2.8%), and tooth transposition (1.4%). The lower right second premolar was the most frequent missing teeth; 3.7% had only one tooth agenesis, and 0.08% had six or more missing tooth (Oligodontia). Mesiodens was the most common type of supernumerary tooth (0.66%). Two subjects had taurodontic tooth (0.04%). Tooth transpositions and displacement of maxillary canine were seen in 1.4 and 7.5%, retrospectively (approximately 69 and 58% were in the 8 and 9 year-old groups, retrospectively). Significant associations were detected between the different dental anomalies (P < .05).

CONCLUSIONS

The results of our study revealed significant associations among different dental anomalies and provide further evidences to support common etiological factors.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Orthodontics, Department of Clinical Sciences and Translational Medicine, University of Rome Tor Vergata, Via Montpellier, 1, 00133, Rome, Italy. giuseppinalagana@libero.it.Department of Orthodontics, Department of Clinical Sciences and Translational Medicine, University of Rome Tor Vergata, Via Montpellier, 1, 00133, Rome, Italy.Private Practice of Orthodontics, London, England, UK. Warwick Medical School, University of Warwick, Coventry, England, UK.Private Practice, Rome, Italy.Department of Orthodontics, Department of Clinical Sciences and Translational Medicine, University of Rome Tor Vergata, Via Montpellier, 1, 00133, Rome, Italy.Department of Orthodontics, Department of Clinical Sciences and Translational Medicine, University of Rome Tor Vergata, Via Montpellier, 1, 00133, Rome, Italy.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

28284207

Citation

Laganà, G, et al. "Dental Anomalies: Prevalence and Associations Between Them in a Large Sample of Non-orthodontic Subjects, a Cross-sectional Study." BMC Oral Health, vol. 17, no. 1, 2017, p. 62.
Laganà G, Venza N, Borzabadi-Farahani A, et al. Dental anomalies: prevalence and associations between them in a large sample of non-orthodontic subjects, a cross-sectional study. BMC Oral Health. 2017;17(1):62.
Laganà, G., Venza, N., Borzabadi-Farahani, A., Fabi, F., Danesi, C., & Cozza, P. (2017). Dental anomalies: prevalence and associations between them in a large sample of non-orthodontic subjects, a cross-sectional study. BMC Oral Health, 17(1), 62. https://doi.org/10.1186/s12903-017-0352-y
Laganà G, et al. Dental Anomalies: Prevalence and Associations Between Them in a Large Sample of Non-orthodontic Subjects, a Cross-sectional Study. BMC Oral Health. 2017 Mar 11;17(1):62. PubMed PMID: 28284207.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Dental anomalies: prevalence and associations between them in a large sample of non-orthodontic subjects, a cross-sectional study. AU - Laganà,G, AU - Venza,N, AU - Borzabadi-Farahani,A, AU - Fabi,F, AU - Danesi,C, AU - Cozza,P, Y1 - 2017/03/11/ PY - 2016/10/24/received PY - 2017/02/20/accepted PY - 2017/3/13/entrez PY - 2017/3/13/pubmed PY - 2018/7/10/medline KW - Non-orthodontic subjects KW - Panoramic radiograph KW - Tooth anomalies SP - 62 EP - 62 JF - BMC oral health JO - BMC Oral Health VL - 17 IS - 1 N2 - BACKGROUND: To analyze the prevalence and associations between dental anomalies detectable on panoramic radiographs in a sample of non-orthodontic growing subjects. METHODS: For this cross-sectional study, digital panoramic radiographs of 5005 subjects were initially screened from a single radiographic center in Rome. Inclusion criteria were: subjects who were aged 8-12 years, Caucasian, and had good diagnostic quality radiographs. Syndromic subjects, those with craniofacial malformation, or orthodontic patients were excluded and this led to a sample of 4706 subjects [mean (SD) age = 9.6 (1.2) years, 2366 males and 2340 females]. Sample was subsequently divided into four subgroups (8, 9, 10, and 11-12 year-old groups). Two operators examined panoramic radiographs to observe the presence of common dental anomalies. The prevalence and associations between dental anomalies were also investigated. RESULTS: The overall prevalence of dental anomalies was 20.9%. Approximately, 17.9% showed only one anomaly, 2.7% two anomalies, while only 0.3% had more than two anomalies. The most frequent anomalies were the displacement of maxillary canine (7.5%), hypodontia (7.1%), impacted teeth (3.9%), tooth ankylosis (2.8%), and tooth transposition (1.4%). The lower right second premolar was the most frequent missing teeth; 3.7% had only one tooth agenesis, and 0.08% had six or more missing tooth (Oligodontia). Mesiodens was the most common type of supernumerary tooth (0.66%). Two subjects had taurodontic tooth (0.04%). Tooth transpositions and displacement of maxillary canine were seen in 1.4 and 7.5%, retrospectively (approximately 69 and 58% were in the 8 and 9 year-old groups, retrospectively). Significant associations were detected between the different dental anomalies (P < .05). CONCLUSIONS: The results of our study revealed significant associations among different dental anomalies and provide further evidences to support common etiological factors. SN - 1472-6831 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/28284207/Dental_anomalies:_prevalence_and_associations_between_them_in_a_large_sample_of_non_orthodontic_subjects_a_cross_sectional_study_ L2 - https://bmcoralhealth.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s12903-017-0352-y DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -