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Association between pre-pregnancy consumption of meat, iron intake, and the risk of gestational diabetes: the SUN project.
Eur J Nutr 2018; 57(3):939-949EJ

Abstract

PURPOSE

We assessed the association of total meat, processed, and unprocessed red meat and iron intake with the risk of developing gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) in pregnant women.

METHODS

We conducted a prospective study among 3298 disease-free Spanish women participants of the SUN cohort who reported at least one pregnancy between December 1999 and March 2012. Meat consumption and iron intake were assessed at baseline through a validated, 136-item semi-quantitative, food frequency questionnaire. We categorized total, red, and processed meat consumption and iron intake into quartiles. Logistic regression models were used to adjust for potential confounders.

RESULTS

We identified 172 incident cases of GDM. In the fully adjusted analysis, total meat consumption was significantly associated with a higher risk of GDM [OR = 1.67 (95% CI 1.06-2.63, p-trend 0.010)] for the highest versus the lowest quartile of consumption. The observed associations were particularly strong for red meat consumption [OR = 2.37 (95% CI 1.49-3.78, p-trend < 0.001)] and processed meat consumption [OR = 2.01 (95% CI 1.26-3.21, p-trend 0.003)]. Heme iron intake was also directly associated with GDM [OR = 2.21 (95% CI 1.37-3.58, p-trend 0.003)], although the association was attenuated and lost its statistical significance when we adjusted for red meat consumption [OR = 1.57 (95% CI 0.91-2.70, p-trend 0.213)]. No association was observed for non-heme and total iron intake, including supplements.

CONCLUSIONS

Our overall findings suggest that higher pre-pregnancy consumption of total meat, especially red and processed meat, and heme iron intake, are significantly associated with an increased GDM risk in a Mediterranean cohort of university graduates.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Preventive Medicine and Public Health, School of Medicine, University of Navarra, Irunlarrea 1, 31008, Pamplona, Navarra, Spain. Division of Nutrition, Department of Endocrinology and Nutrition, Hospital de Navarra, Pamplona, Spain.Department of Preventive Medicine and Public Health, School of Medicine, University of Navarra, Irunlarrea 1, 31008, Pamplona, Navarra, Spain.Department of Preventive Medicine and Public Health, School of Medicine, University of Navarra, Irunlarrea 1, 31008, Pamplona, Navarra, Spain. Department of Internal Medicine (Endocrinology), Hospital Reina Sofia, Tudela, Spain.Department of Preventive Medicine and Public Health, School of Medicine, University of Navarra, Irunlarrea 1, 31008, Pamplona, Navarra, Spain. Navarra Institute for Health Research (IDISNA), Pamplona, Spain. Biomedical Research Center Network on Physiopathology of Obesity and Nutrition (CIBERobn), Institute of Health Carlos III, Madrid, Spain.Department of Preventive Medicine and Public Health, School of Medicine, University of Navarra, Irunlarrea 1, 31008, Pamplona, Navarra, Spain. Navarra Institute for Health Research (IDISNA), Pamplona, Spain. Biomedical Research Center Network on Physiopathology of Obesity and Nutrition (CIBERobn), Institute of Health Carlos III, Madrid, Spain.Department of Preventive Medicine and Public Health, School of Medicine, University of Navarra, Irunlarrea 1, 31008, Pamplona, Navarra, Spain. mbes@unav.es. Navarra Institute for Health Research (IDISNA), Pamplona, Spain. mbes@unav.es. Biomedical Research Center Network on Physiopathology of Obesity and Nutrition (CIBERobn), Institute of Health Carlos III, Madrid, Spain. mbes@unav.es.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Observational Study

Language

eng

PubMed ID

28285431

Citation

Marí-Sanchis, Amelia, et al. "Association Between Pre-pregnancy Consumption of Meat, Iron Intake, and the Risk of Gestational Diabetes: the SUN Project." European Journal of Nutrition, vol. 57, no. 3, 2018, pp. 939-949.
Marí-Sanchis A, Díaz-Jurado G, Basterra-Gortari FJ, et al. Association between pre-pregnancy consumption of meat, iron intake, and the risk of gestational diabetes: the SUN project. Eur J Nutr. 2018;57(3):939-949.
Marí-Sanchis, A., Díaz-Jurado, G., Basterra-Gortari, F. J., de la Fuente-Arrillaga, C., Martínez-González, M. A., & Bes-Rastrollo, M. (2018). Association between pre-pregnancy consumption of meat, iron intake, and the risk of gestational diabetes: the SUN project. European Journal of Nutrition, 57(3), pp. 939-949. doi:10.1007/s00394-017-1377-3.
Marí-Sanchis A, et al. Association Between Pre-pregnancy Consumption of Meat, Iron Intake, and the Risk of Gestational Diabetes: the SUN Project. Eur J Nutr. 2018;57(3):939-949. PubMed PMID: 28285431.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Association between pre-pregnancy consumption of meat, iron intake, and the risk of gestational diabetes: the SUN project. AU - Marí-Sanchis,Amelia, AU - Díaz-Jurado,Ginette, AU - Basterra-Gortari,F Javier, AU - de la Fuente-Arrillaga,Carmen, AU - Martínez-González,Miguel A, AU - Bes-Rastrollo,Maira, Y1 - 2017/03/11/ PY - 2016/04/19/received PY - 2017/01/03/accepted PY - 2017/3/13/pubmed PY - 2018/9/25/medline PY - 2017/3/13/entrez KW - Gestational diabetes mellitus KW - Heme iron intake KW - Mediterranean population KW - Red and processed meat KW - Total meat SP - 939 EP - 949 JF - European journal of nutrition JO - Eur J Nutr VL - 57 IS - 3 N2 - PURPOSE: We assessed the association of total meat, processed, and unprocessed red meat and iron intake with the risk of developing gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) in pregnant women. METHODS: We conducted a prospective study among 3298 disease-free Spanish women participants of the SUN cohort who reported at least one pregnancy between December 1999 and March 2012. Meat consumption and iron intake were assessed at baseline through a validated, 136-item semi-quantitative, food frequency questionnaire. We categorized total, red, and processed meat consumption and iron intake into quartiles. Logistic regression models were used to adjust for potential confounders. RESULTS: We identified 172 incident cases of GDM. In the fully adjusted analysis, total meat consumption was significantly associated with a higher risk of GDM [OR = 1.67 (95% CI 1.06-2.63, p-trend 0.010)] for the highest versus the lowest quartile of consumption. The observed associations were particularly strong for red meat consumption [OR = 2.37 (95% CI 1.49-3.78, p-trend < 0.001)] and processed meat consumption [OR = 2.01 (95% CI 1.26-3.21, p-trend 0.003)]. Heme iron intake was also directly associated with GDM [OR = 2.21 (95% CI 1.37-3.58, p-trend 0.003)], although the association was attenuated and lost its statistical significance when we adjusted for red meat consumption [OR = 1.57 (95% CI 0.91-2.70, p-trend 0.213)]. No association was observed for non-heme and total iron intake, including supplements. CONCLUSIONS: Our overall findings suggest that higher pre-pregnancy consumption of total meat, especially red and processed meat, and heme iron intake, are significantly associated with an increased GDM risk in a Mediterranean cohort of university graduates. SN - 1436-6215 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/28285431/Association_between_pre_pregnancy_consumption_of_meat_iron_intake_and_the_risk_of_gestational_diabetes:_the_SUN_project_ L2 - https://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00394-017-1377-3 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -