Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Sex differences in adolescents' glycaemic and insulinaemic responses to high and low glycaemic index breakfasts: a randomised control trial.
Br J Nutr 2017; 117(4):541-547BJ

Abstract

During puberty young people undergo significant hormonal changes which affect metabolism and, subsequently, health. Evidence suggests there is a period of transient pubertal insulin resistance, with this effect greater in girls than boys. However, the response to everyday high and low glycaemic index (GI) meals remains unknown. Following ethical approval, forty adolescents consumed a high GI or low GI breakfast, in a randomised cross-over design. Capillary blood samples were taken during a 2-h postprandial period, examining the glycaemic and insulinaemic responses. Maturity offset and homoeostatic model assessment (HOMA) were also calculated. The glycaemic response to the breakfasts was similar between boys and girls, as shown by similar peak blood glucose concentrations and incremental AUC (IAUC) following both high and low GI breakfasts (all P>0·05). Girls exhibited a higher peak plasma insulin concentration 30 min post-breakfast following both high GI (P=0·043, g=0·69) and low GI (P=0·010, g=0·84) breakfasts, as well as a greater IAUC following high GI (P=0·041, g=0·66) and low GI (P=0·041, g=0·66) breakfasts. HOMA was positively correlated with the insulinaemic responses (all P<0·0005) and maturity offset (P=0·037). The findings of the present study suggest that pubertal insulin resistance affects the postprandial insulinaemic responses to both high and low GI meals. Specifically, girls exhibit a greater insulinaemic response than boys to both meals, despite similar glycaemic responses. This study is the first to report the glycaemic and insulinaemic responses to everyday meals in boys and girls, supporting the recommendation for young people to base their diet on low GI carbohydrates.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Exercise and Health Research Group, Department of Sports Science, Sport Health and Performance Enhancement (SHAPE) Research Centre,Nottingham Trent University,Nottingham NG11 8NS,UK.Exercise and Health Research Group, Department of Sports Science, Sport Health and Performance Enhancement (SHAPE) Research Centre,Nottingham Trent University,Nottingham NG11 8NS,UK.Exercise and Health Research Group, Department of Sports Science, Sport Health and Performance Enhancement (SHAPE) Research Centre,Nottingham Trent University,Nottingham NG11 8NS,UK.Exercise and Health Research Group, Department of Sports Science, Sport Health and Performance Enhancement (SHAPE) Research Centre,Nottingham Trent University,Nottingham NG11 8NS,UK.Exercise and Health Research Group, Department of Sports Science, Sport Health and Performance Enhancement (SHAPE) Research Centre,Nottingham Trent University,Nottingham NG11 8NS,UK.Exercise and Health Research Group, Department of Sports Science, Sport Health and Performance Enhancement (SHAPE) Research Centre,Nottingham Trent University,Nottingham NG11 8NS,UK.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial

Language

eng

PubMed ID

28285608

Citation

Cooper, Simon B., et al. "Sex Differences in Adolescents' Glycaemic and Insulinaemic Responses to High and Low Glycaemic Index Breakfasts: a Randomised Control Trial." The British Journal of Nutrition, vol. 117, no. 4, 2017, pp. 541-547.
Cooper SB, Dring KJ, Morris JG, et al. Sex differences in adolescents' glycaemic and insulinaemic responses to high and low glycaemic index breakfasts: a randomised control trial. Br J Nutr. 2017;117(4):541-547.
Cooper, S. B., Dring, K. J., Morris, J. G., Cousins, B. E., Nute, M. L., & Nevill, M. E. (2017). Sex differences in adolescents' glycaemic and insulinaemic responses to high and low glycaemic index breakfasts: a randomised control trial. The British Journal of Nutrition, 117(4), pp. 541-547. doi:10.1017/S0007114517000447.
Cooper SB, et al. Sex Differences in Adolescents' Glycaemic and Insulinaemic Responses to High and Low Glycaemic Index Breakfasts: a Randomised Control Trial. Br J Nutr. 2017;117(4):541-547. PubMed PMID: 28285608.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Sex differences in adolescents' glycaemic and insulinaemic responses to high and low glycaemic index breakfasts: a randomised control trial. AU - Cooper,Simon B, AU - Dring,Karah J, AU - Morris,John G, AU - Cousins,Ben E W, AU - Nute,Maria L, AU - Nevill,Mary E, Y1 - 2017/03/13/ PY - 2017/3/14/pubmed PY - 2017/5/23/medline PY - 2017/3/14/entrez KW - GI glycaemic index KW - HOMA homoeostatic model assessment KW - IAUC incremental AUC KW - Breakfast glycaemic index KW - Insulin resistance KW - Puberty KW - Sex differences SP - 541 EP - 547 JF - The British journal of nutrition JO - Br. J. Nutr. VL - 117 IS - 4 N2 - During puberty young people undergo significant hormonal changes which affect metabolism and, subsequently, health. Evidence suggests there is a period of transient pubertal insulin resistance, with this effect greater in girls than boys. However, the response to everyday high and low glycaemic index (GI) meals remains unknown. Following ethical approval, forty adolescents consumed a high GI or low GI breakfast, in a randomised cross-over design. Capillary blood samples were taken during a 2-h postprandial period, examining the glycaemic and insulinaemic responses. Maturity offset and homoeostatic model assessment (HOMA) were also calculated. The glycaemic response to the breakfasts was similar between boys and girls, as shown by similar peak blood glucose concentrations and incremental AUC (IAUC) following both high and low GI breakfasts (all P>0·05). Girls exhibited a higher peak plasma insulin concentration 30 min post-breakfast following both high GI (P=0·043, g=0·69) and low GI (P=0·010, g=0·84) breakfasts, as well as a greater IAUC following high GI (P=0·041, g=0·66) and low GI (P=0·041, g=0·66) breakfasts. HOMA was positively correlated with the insulinaemic responses (all P<0·0005) and maturity offset (P=0·037). The findings of the present study suggest that pubertal insulin resistance affects the postprandial insulinaemic responses to both high and low GI meals. Specifically, girls exhibit a greater insulinaemic response than boys to both meals, despite similar glycaemic responses. This study is the first to report the glycaemic and insulinaemic responses to everyday meals in boys and girls, supporting the recommendation for young people to base their diet on low GI carbohydrates. SN - 1475-2662 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/28285608/Sex_differences_in_adolescents'_glycaemic_and_insulinaemic_responses_to_high_and_low_glycaemic_index_breakfasts:_a_randomised_control_trial_ L2 - https://www.cambridge.org/core/product/identifier/S0007114517000447/type/journal_article DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -