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Social inclusion for children with hearing loss in listening and spoken Language early intervention: an exploratory study.
BMC Pediatr. 2017 03 14; 17(1):74.BPed

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Social inclusion is a common focus of listening and spoken language (LSL) early intervention for children with hearing loss. This exploratory study compared the social inclusion of young children with hearing loss educated using a listening and spoken language approach with population data.

METHODS

A framework for understanding the scope of social inclusion is presented in the Background. This framework guided the use of a shortened, modified version of the Longitudinal Study of Australian Children (LSAC) to measure two of the five facets of social inclusion ('education' and 'interacting with society and fulfilling social goals'). The survey was completed by parents of children with hearing loss aged 4-5 years who were educated using a LSL approach (n = 78; 37% who responded). These responses were compared to those obtained for typical hearing children in the LSAC dataset (n = 3265).

RESULTS

Analyses revealed that most children with hearing loss had comparable outcomes to those with typical hearing on the 'education' and 'interacting with society and fulfilling social roles' facets of social inclusion.

CONCLUSIONS

These exploratory findings are positive and warrant further investigation across all five facets of the framework to identify which factors influence social inclusion.

Authors+Show Affiliations

School of Allied Health, Australian Catholic University, Melbourne, Australia. gabriella.sharpe@acu.edu.au.. Centre for Health Stewardship, ANU Medical School, The Australian National University, Canberra, Australia.. The Shepherd Centre, Sydney, Australia.. Hear and Say, Brisbane, Australia. School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences, University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia.Research School of Psychology, The Australian National University, Canberra, Australia.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

28292268

Citation

Constantinescu-Sharpe, Gabriella, et al. "Social Inclusion for Children With Hearing Loss in Listening and Spoken Language Early Intervention: an Exploratory Study." BMC Pediatrics, vol. 17, no. 1, 2017, p. 74.
Constantinescu-Sharpe G, Phillips RL, Davis A, et al. Social inclusion for children with hearing loss in listening and spoken Language early intervention: an exploratory study. BMC Pediatr. 2017;17(1):74.
Constantinescu-Sharpe, G., Phillips, R. L., Davis, A., Dornan, D., & Hogan, A. (2017). Social inclusion for children with hearing loss in listening and spoken Language early intervention: an exploratory study. BMC Pediatrics, 17(1), 74. https://doi.org/10.1186/s12887-017-0823-y
Constantinescu-Sharpe G, et al. Social Inclusion for Children With Hearing Loss in Listening and Spoken Language Early Intervention: an Exploratory Study. BMC Pediatr. 2017 03 14;17(1):74. PubMed PMID: 28292268.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Social inclusion for children with hearing loss in listening and spoken Language early intervention: an exploratory study. AU - Constantinescu-Sharpe,Gabriella, AU - Phillips,Rebecca L, AU - Davis,Aleisha, AU - Dornan,Dimity, AU - Hogan,Anthony, Y1 - 2017/03/14/ PY - 2015/08/25/received PY - 2017/03/02/accepted PY - 2017/3/16/entrez PY - 2017/3/16/pubmed PY - 2018/2/20/medline KW - Children KW - Hearing loss KW - Listening and spoken language KW - Social inclusion SP - 74 EP - 74 JF - BMC pediatrics JO - BMC Pediatr VL - 17 IS - 1 N2 - BACKGROUND: Social inclusion is a common focus of listening and spoken language (LSL) early intervention for children with hearing loss. This exploratory study compared the social inclusion of young children with hearing loss educated using a listening and spoken language approach with population data. METHODS: A framework for understanding the scope of social inclusion is presented in the Background. This framework guided the use of a shortened, modified version of the Longitudinal Study of Australian Children (LSAC) to measure two of the five facets of social inclusion ('education' and 'interacting with society and fulfilling social goals'). The survey was completed by parents of children with hearing loss aged 4-5 years who were educated using a LSL approach (n = 78; 37% who responded). These responses were compared to those obtained for typical hearing children in the LSAC dataset (n = 3265). RESULTS: Analyses revealed that most children with hearing loss had comparable outcomes to those with typical hearing on the 'education' and 'interacting with society and fulfilling social roles' facets of social inclusion. CONCLUSIONS: These exploratory findings are positive and warrant further investigation across all five facets of the framework to identify which factors influence social inclusion. SN - 1471-2431 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/28292268/Social_inclusion_for_children_with_hearing_loss_in_listening_and_spoken_Language_early_intervention:_an_exploratory_study_ L2 - https://bmcpediatr.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s12887-017-0823-y DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -