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Functional network connectivity abnormalities in multiple sclerosis: Correlations with disability and cognitive impairment.
Mult Scler. 2018 04; 24(4):459-471.MS

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To investigate resting state (RS) functional connectivity (FC) abnormalities within the principal brain networks in a large cohort of multiple sclerosis (MS) patients, to define the trajectory of FC changes over disease stages and their relation with clinical and structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) measures.

METHODS

RS functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), clinical, and neuropsychological evaluation were obtained from 215 MS patients and 98 healthy controls. Connectivity abnormalities and correlations with clinical/neuropsychological/imaging measures were evaluated. We analyzed seed-voxel FC with seven major hubs, producing one visual/sensory, one motor, two cognitive, one cerebellar, and two subcortical networks.

RESULTS

MS patients showed reduced network average RS FC versus controls in the default-mode network. At regional level, a complex pattern of decreased and increased RS FC was found. Reduced RS FC mainly involved sensorimotor, cognitive, thalamic, and cerebellar networks, whereas increased RS FC involved visual/sensory and subcortical networks. Reduced RS FC correlated with T2 lesions. Reduced thalamic RS FC correlated with better neuropsychological performance, whereas for all remaining networks reduced FC correlated with more severe clinical/cognitive impairment.

CONCLUSION

Increased and decreased RS FC occurs in MS and contributes to a wide spectrum of clinical manifestations. RS FC reduction is related to T2 lesions. Such a paradigm is inverted for the thalamic network.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Neuroimaging Research Unit, Institute of Experimental Neurology, Division of Neuroscience, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Vita-Salute San Raffaele University, Milan, Italy/Department of Neurology, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Vita-Salute San Raffaele University, Milan, Italy.Neuroimaging Research Unit, Institute of Experimental Neurology, Division of Neuroscience, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Vita-Salute San Raffaele University, Milan, Italy.Department of Neurology, Multiple Sclerosis Clinical Care and Research Center, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, NY, USA.Department of Neurology, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Vita-Salute San Raffaele University, Milan, Italy.Department of Neurology, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Vita-Salute San Raffaele University, Milan, Italy.Neuroimaging Research Unit, Institute of Experimental Neurology, Division of Neuroscience, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Vita-Salute San Raffaele University, Milan, Italy.Department of Neurology, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Vita-Salute San Raffaele University, Milan, Italy.Department of Neurology, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Vita-Salute San Raffaele University, Milan, Italy.Department of Neuroradiology, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Vita-Salute San Raffaele University, Milan, Italy.Department of Neurology, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Vita-Salute San Raffaele University, Milan, Italy.Neuroimaging Research Unit, Institute of Experimental Neurology, Division of Neuroscience, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Vita-Salute San Raffaele University, Milan, Italy/Department of Neurology, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Vita-Salute San Raffaele University, Milan, Italy.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

28294693

Citation

Rocca, Maria A., et al. "Functional Network Connectivity Abnormalities in Multiple Sclerosis: Correlations With Disability and Cognitive Impairment." Multiple Sclerosis (Houndmills, Basingstoke, England), vol. 24, no. 4, 2018, pp. 459-471.
Rocca MA, Valsasina P, Leavitt VM, et al. Functional network connectivity abnormalities in multiple sclerosis: Correlations with disability and cognitive impairment. Mult Scler. 2018;24(4):459-471.
Rocca, M. A., Valsasina, P., Leavitt, V. M., Rodegher, M., Radaelli, M., Riccitelli, G. C., Martinelli, V., Martinelli-Boneschi, F., Falini, A., Comi, G., & Filippi, M. (2018). Functional network connectivity abnormalities in multiple sclerosis: Correlations with disability and cognitive impairment. Multiple Sclerosis (Houndmills, Basingstoke, England), 24(4), 459-471. https://doi.org/10.1177/1352458517699875
Rocca MA, et al. Functional Network Connectivity Abnormalities in Multiple Sclerosis: Correlations With Disability and Cognitive Impairment. Mult Scler. 2018;24(4):459-471. PubMed PMID: 28294693.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Functional network connectivity abnormalities in multiple sclerosis: Correlations with disability and cognitive impairment. AU - Rocca,Maria A, AU - Valsasina,Paola, AU - Leavitt,Victoria M, AU - Rodegher,Mariaemma, AU - Radaelli,Marta, AU - Riccitelli,Gianna C, AU - Martinelli,Vittorio, AU - Martinelli-Boneschi,Filippo, AU - Falini,Andrea, AU - Comi,Giancarlo, AU - Filippi,Massimo, Y1 - 2017/03/15/ PY - 2017/3/16/pubmed PY - 2019/8/30/medline PY - 2017/3/16/entrez KW - Resting state KW - clinical phenotype KW - cognitive impairment KW - functional connectivity KW - multiple sclerosis SP - 459 EP - 471 JF - Multiple sclerosis (Houndmills, Basingstoke, England) JO - Mult. Scler. VL - 24 IS - 4 N2 - OBJECTIVE: To investigate resting state (RS) functional connectivity (FC) abnormalities within the principal brain networks in a large cohort of multiple sclerosis (MS) patients, to define the trajectory of FC changes over disease stages and their relation with clinical and structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) measures. METHODS: RS functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), clinical, and neuropsychological evaluation were obtained from 215 MS patients and 98 healthy controls. Connectivity abnormalities and correlations with clinical/neuropsychological/imaging measures were evaluated. We analyzed seed-voxel FC with seven major hubs, producing one visual/sensory, one motor, two cognitive, one cerebellar, and two subcortical networks. RESULTS: MS patients showed reduced network average RS FC versus controls in the default-mode network. At regional level, a complex pattern of decreased and increased RS FC was found. Reduced RS FC mainly involved sensorimotor, cognitive, thalamic, and cerebellar networks, whereas increased RS FC involved visual/sensory and subcortical networks. Reduced RS FC correlated with T2 lesions. Reduced thalamic RS FC correlated with better neuropsychological performance, whereas for all remaining networks reduced FC correlated with more severe clinical/cognitive impairment. CONCLUSION: Increased and decreased RS FC occurs in MS and contributes to a wide spectrum of clinical manifestations. RS FC reduction is related to T2 lesions. Such a paradigm is inverted for the thalamic network. SN - 1477-0970 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/28294693/Functional_network_connectivity_abnormalities_in_multiple_sclerosis:_Correlations_with_disability_and_cognitive_impairment_ L2 - http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/full/10.1177/1352458517699875?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -