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Does familial risk for alcohol use disorder predict alcohol hangover?
Psychopharmacology (Berl) 2017; 234(12):1795-1802P

Abstract

AIMS

Positive family history of alcohol use disorder (FHP), a variable associated with propensity for alcohol use disorder (AUD), has been linked with elevated hangover frequency and severity, after controlling for alcohol use. This implies that hangover experiences may be related to AUD. However, inadequate control of alcohol consumption levels, low alcohol dose and testing for hangover during the intoxication phase detract from these findings. Here, we present further data pertinent to understanding the relationship between family history and alcohol hangover.

METHODS

Study 1 compared past year hangover frequency in a survey of 24 FHP and 118 family history negative (FHN) individuals. Study 2 applied a quasi-experimental naturalistic approach assessing concurrent hangover severity in 17 FHP and 32 FHN individuals the morning after drinking alcohol. Both studies applied statistical control for alcohol consumption levels.

RESULTS

In Study 1, both FHP status and estimated blood alcohol concentration on the heaviest drinking evening of the past month predicted the frequency of hangover symptoms experienced over the previous 12 months. In Study 2, estimated blood alcohol concentration the previous evening predicted hangover severity but FHP status did not.

CONCLUSIONS

FHP, indicating familial risk for AUD, was not associated with concurrent hangover severity but was associated with increased estimates of hangover frequency the previous year.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Keele University, Keele, Staffordshire, ST5 5BG, Newcastle, UK. r.stephens@keele.ac.uk.Keele University, Keele, Staffordshire, ST5 5BG, Newcastle, UK.Keele University, Keele, Staffordshire, ST5 5BG, Newcastle, UK.Psychology Department, University of Central Lancashire (UCLAN), Fylde Rd, PR1 2HE, Preston, UK.Health and Safety Laboratory, Buxton, UK.Acadia University, Wolfville, Canada.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

28303371

Citation

Stephens, Richard, et al. "Does Familial Risk for Alcohol Use Disorder Predict Alcohol Hangover?" Psychopharmacology, vol. 234, no. 12, 2017, pp. 1795-1802.
Stephens R, Holloway K, Grange JA, et al. Does familial risk for alcohol use disorder predict alcohol hangover? Psychopharmacology (Berl). 2017;234(12):1795-1802.
Stephens, R., Holloway, K., Grange, J. A., Owen, L., Jones, K., & Kruisselbrink, D. (2017). Does familial risk for alcohol use disorder predict alcohol hangover? Psychopharmacology, 234(12), pp. 1795-1802. doi:10.1007/s00213-017-4585-x.
Stephens R, et al. Does Familial Risk for Alcohol Use Disorder Predict Alcohol Hangover. Psychopharmacology (Berl). 2017;234(12):1795-1802. PubMed PMID: 28303371.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Does familial risk for alcohol use disorder predict alcohol hangover? AU - Stephens,Richard, AU - Holloway,Kara, AU - Grange,James A, AU - Owen,Lauren, AU - Jones,Kate, AU - Kruisselbrink,Darren, Y1 - 2017/03/16/ PY - 2016/09/28/received PY - 2017/02/27/accepted PY - 2017/3/18/pubmed PY - 2018/1/25/medline PY - 2017/3/18/entrez KW - Alcohol hangover frequency KW - Alcohol hangover severity KW - Alcohol use disorder (AUD) KW - Concurrent hangover KW - Family history SP - 1795 EP - 1802 JF - Psychopharmacology JO - Psychopharmacology (Berl.) VL - 234 IS - 12 N2 - AIMS: Positive family history of alcohol use disorder (FHP), a variable associated with propensity for alcohol use disorder (AUD), has been linked with elevated hangover frequency and severity, after controlling for alcohol use. This implies that hangover experiences may be related to AUD. However, inadequate control of alcohol consumption levels, low alcohol dose and testing for hangover during the intoxication phase detract from these findings. Here, we present further data pertinent to understanding the relationship between family history and alcohol hangover. METHODS: Study 1 compared past year hangover frequency in a survey of 24 FHP and 118 family history negative (FHN) individuals. Study 2 applied a quasi-experimental naturalistic approach assessing concurrent hangover severity in 17 FHP and 32 FHN individuals the morning after drinking alcohol. Both studies applied statistical control for alcohol consumption levels. RESULTS: In Study 1, both FHP status and estimated blood alcohol concentration on the heaviest drinking evening of the past month predicted the frequency of hangover symptoms experienced over the previous 12 months. In Study 2, estimated blood alcohol concentration the previous evening predicted hangover severity but FHP status did not. CONCLUSIONS: FHP, indicating familial risk for AUD, was not associated with concurrent hangover severity but was associated with increased estimates of hangover frequency the previous year. SN - 1432-2072 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/28303371/Does_familial_risk_for_alcohol_use_disorder_predict_alcohol_hangover L2 - https://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00213-017-4585-x DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -