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Police Brutality and Black Health: Setting the Agenda for Public Health Scholars.
Am J Public Health. 2017 05; 107(5):662-665.AJ

Abstract

We investigated links between police brutality and poor health outcomes among Blacks and identified five intersecting pathways: (1) fatal injuries that increase population-specific mortality rates; (2) adverse physiological responses that increase morbidity; (3) racist public reactions that cause stress; (4) arrests, incarcerations, and legal, medical, and funeral bills that cause financial strain; and (5) integrated oppressive structures that cause systematic disempowerment. Public health scholars should champion efforts to implement surveillance of police brutality and press funders to support research to understand the experiences of people faced with police brutality. We must ask whether our own research, teaching, and service are intentionally antiracist and challenge the institutions we work in to ask the same. To reduce racial health inequities, public health scholars must rigorously explore the relationship between police brutality and health, and advocate policies that address racist oppression.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Sirry Alang is with the Program in Health, Medicine, and Society and the Department of Sociology, Lehigh University, Bethlehem, PA. Donna McAlpine and Rachel Hardeman are with the Division of Health Policy and Management, University of Minnesota School of Public Health, Minneapolis. Ellen McCreedy is with the Center for Gerontology and Healthcare Research, School of Public Health, Brown University, Providence, RI.Sirry Alang is with the Program in Health, Medicine, and Society and the Department of Sociology, Lehigh University, Bethlehem, PA. Donna McAlpine and Rachel Hardeman are with the Division of Health Policy and Management, University of Minnesota School of Public Health, Minneapolis. Ellen McCreedy is with the Center for Gerontology and Healthcare Research, School of Public Health, Brown University, Providence, RI.Sirry Alang is with the Program in Health, Medicine, and Society and the Department of Sociology, Lehigh University, Bethlehem, PA. Donna McAlpine and Rachel Hardeman are with the Division of Health Policy and Management, University of Minnesota School of Public Health, Minneapolis. Ellen McCreedy is with the Center for Gerontology and Healthcare Research, School of Public Health, Brown University, Providence, RI.Sirry Alang is with the Program in Health, Medicine, and Society and the Department of Sociology, Lehigh University, Bethlehem, PA. Donna McAlpine and Rachel Hardeman are with the Division of Health Policy and Management, University of Minnesota School of Public Health, Minneapolis. Ellen McCreedy is with the Center for Gerontology and Healthcare Research, School of Public Health, Brown University, Providence, RI.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

28323470

Citation

Alang, Sirry, et al. "Police Brutality and Black Health: Setting the Agenda for Public Health Scholars." American Journal of Public Health, vol. 107, no. 5, 2017, pp. 662-665.
Alang S, McAlpine D, McCreedy E, et al. Police Brutality and Black Health: Setting the Agenda for Public Health Scholars. Am J Public Health. 2017;107(5):662-665.
Alang, S., McAlpine, D., McCreedy, E., & Hardeman, R. (2017). Police Brutality and Black Health: Setting the Agenda for Public Health Scholars. American Journal of Public Health, 107(5), 662-665. https://doi.org/10.2105/AJPH.2017.303691
Alang S, et al. Police Brutality and Black Health: Setting the Agenda for Public Health Scholars. Am J Public Health. 2017;107(5):662-665. PubMed PMID: 28323470.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Police Brutality and Black Health: Setting the Agenda for Public Health Scholars. AU - Alang,Sirry, AU - McAlpine,Donna, AU - McCreedy,Ellen, AU - Hardeman,Rachel, Y1 - 2017/03/21/ PY - 2017/3/23/pubmed PY - 2017/6/6/medline PY - 2017/3/22/entrez SP - 662 EP - 665 JF - American journal of public health JO - Am J Public Health VL - 107 IS - 5 N2 - We investigated links between police brutality and poor health outcomes among Blacks and identified five intersecting pathways: (1) fatal injuries that increase population-specific mortality rates; (2) adverse physiological responses that increase morbidity; (3) racist public reactions that cause stress; (4) arrests, incarcerations, and legal, medical, and funeral bills that cause financial strain; and (5) integrated oppressive structures that cause systematic disempowerment. Public health scholars should champion efforts to implement surveillance of police brutality and press funders to support research to understand the experiences of people faced with police brutality. We must ask whether our own research, teaching, and service are intentionally antiracist and challenge the institutions we work in to ask the same. To reduce racial health inequities, public health scholars must rigorously explore the relationship between police brutality and health, and advocate policies that address racist oppression. SN - 1541-0048 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/28323470/Police_Brutality_and_Black_Health:_Setting_the_Agenda_for_Public_Health_Scholars L2 - https://www.ajph.org/doi/10.2105/AJPH.2017.303691?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -