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Stress reactivity and its effects on subsequent food intake in depressed and healthy women with and without adverse childhood experiences.

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Adverse childhood experiences (ACE) increase the risk to develop major depressive disorder (MDD) and obesity or metabolic syndrome in adulthood. In addition, ACE may be associated with an exaggerated endocrine response to stress, which, in turn, may lead to enhanced food intake resulting in obesity and metabolic problems.

METHODS

We systematically examined the stress response and consecutive food intake in 32 women with MDD and ACE as determined by a clinical interview (Early Trauma Inventory), 52 women with MDD without ACE, 22 women with ACE but no current or lifetime MDD and 37 healthy women without either MDD or ACE. All participants underwent a psychosocial stress test (Trier Social Stress Test, TSST) and a control condition (Placebo-TSST) before they were offered a buffet of snacks. Participants were not aware that the primary outcome variable was the amount of consumed kilocalories (kcal).

RESULTS

The four groups did not differ in demographic variables. Stress resulted in higher cortisol release and higher blood pressure compared to the control condition. Patients with MDD without ACE had a significantly lower cortisol response to stress compared to controls. Across groups, we found higher kcal intake after stress compared to the control condition. Comparing high and low cortisol responders to stress, higher kcal intake after stress was only seen in those with low cortisol release.

CONCLUSIONS

This study provides evidence that blunted rather than enhanced cortisol release to stress might lead to increased food intake, independent from MDD and ACE.

Links

  • Publisher Full Text
  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, Charité-Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Campus Benjamin Franklin, Berlin, Germany. Electronic address: katja.wingenfeld@charite.de.

    ,

    Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, Charité-Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Campus Benjamin Franklin, Berlin, Germany.

    ,

    Asklepios Fachklinikum Tiefenbrunn, Rosdorf, Germany.

    ,

    Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, Charité-Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Campus Benjamin Franklin, Berlin, Germany.

    ,

    Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, Charité-Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Campus Benjamin Franklin, Berlin, Germany.

    ,

    Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, Charité-Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Campus Benjamin Franklin, Berlin, Germany.

    ,

    Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, Charité-Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Campus Benjamin Franklin, Berlin, Germany.

    Asklepios Fachklinikum Tiefenbrunn, Rosdorf, Germany.

    Source

    Psychoneuroendocrinology 80: 2017 Jun pg 122-130

    MeSH

    Adult
    Depression
    Depressive Disorder, Major
    Eating
    Feeding Behavior
    Female
    Humans
    Hydrocortisone
    Hypothalamo-Hypophyseal System
    Life Change Events
    Middle Aged
    Pituitary-Adrenal System
    Saliva
    Stress, Psychological

    Pub Type(s)

    Journal Article

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    28324701

    Citation

    Wingenfeld, Katja, et al. "Stress Reactivity and Its Effects On Subsequent Food Intake in Depressed and Healthy Women With and Without Adverse Childhood Experiences." Psychoneuroendocrinology, vol. 80, 2017, pp. 122-130.
    Wingenfeld K, Kuehl LK, Boeker A, et al. Stress reactivity and its effects on subsequent food intake in depressed and healthy women with and without adverse childhood experiences. Psychoneuroendocrinology. 2017;80:122-130.
    Wingenfeld, K., Kuehl, L. K., Boeker, A., Schultebraucks, K., Ritter, K., Hellmann-Regen, J., ... Spitzer, C. (2017). Stress reactivity and its effects on subsequent food intake in depressed and healthy women with and without adverse childhood experiences. Psychoneuroendocrinology, 80, pp. 122-130. doi:10.1016/j.psyneuen.2017.03.014.
    Wingenfeld K, et al. Stress Reactivity and Its Effects On Subsequent Food Intake in Depressed and Healthy Women With and Without Adverse Childhood Experiences. Psychoneuroendocrinology. 2017;80:122-130. PubMed PMID: 28324701.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - Stress reactivity and its effects on subsequent food intake in depressed and healthy women with and without adverse childhood experiences. AU - Wingenfeld,Katja, AU - Kuehl,Linn K, AU - Boeker,Anita, AU - Schultebraucks,Katharina, AU - Ritter,Kristin, AU - Hellmann-Regen,Julian, AU - Otte,Christian, AU - Spitzer,Carsten, Y1 - 2017/03/12/ PY - 2016/12/16/received PY - 2017/02/06/revised PY - 2017/03/09/accepted PY - 2017/3/23/pubmed PY - 2018/3/15/medline PY - 2017/3/22/entrez KW - Adverse childhood experiences KW - Cortisol KW - Depression KW - Eating behavior KW - Stress SP - 122 EP - 130 JF - Psychoneuroendocrinology JO - Psychoneuroendocrinology VL - 80 N2 - BACKGROUND: Adverse childhood experiences (ACE) increase the risk to develop major depressive disorder (MDD) and obesity or metabolic syndrome in adulthood. In addition, ACE may be associated with an exaggerated endocrine response to stress, which, in turn, may lead to enhanced food intake resulting in obesity and metabolic problems. METHODS: We systematically examined the stress response and consecutive food intake in 32 women with MDD and ACE as determined by a clinical interview (Early Trauma Inventory), 52 women with MDD without ACE, 22 women with ACE but no current or lifetime MDD and 37 healthy women without either MDD or ACE. All participants underwent a psychosocial stress test (Trier Social Stress Test, TSST) and a control condition (Placebo-TSST) before they were offered a buffet of snacks. Participants were not aware that the primary outcome variable was the amount of consumed kilocalories (kcal). RESULTS: The four groups did not differ in demographic variables. Stress resulted in higher cortisol release and higher blood pressure compared to the control condition. Patients with MDD without ACE had a significantly lower cortisol response to stress compared to controls. Across groups, we found higher kcal intake after stress compared to the control condition. Comparing high and low cortisol responders to stress, higher kcal intake after stress was only seen in those with low cortisol release. CONCLUSIONS: This study provides evidence that blunted rather than enhanced cortisol release to stress might lead to increased food intake, independent from MDD and ACE. SN - 1873-3360 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/28324701/Stress_reactivity_and_its_effects_on_subsequent_food_intake_in_depressed_and_healthy_women_with_and_without_adverse_childhood_experiences_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0306-4530(16)31031-9 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -