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What Do Children Eat in the Summer? A Direct Observation of Summer Day Camps That Serve Meals.
J Acad Nutr Diet. 2017 Jul; 117(7):1097-1103.JA

Abstract

BACKGROUND

More than 14 million children in the United States attend summer camp annually, yet little is known about the food environment in day camps.

OBJECTIVE

Our aim was to describe the nutritional quality of meals served to, brought by, and consumed by children attending summer day camps serving meals and snacks, and to describe camp water access.

DESIGN

We conducted a cross-sectional study.

PARTICIPANTS/SETTINGS

Participants were 149 children attending five summer camps in Boston, MA, in 2013.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES

Foods and beverages served were observed for 5 consecutive days. For 2 days, children's dietary intake was directly observed using a validated protocol. Outcome measures included total energy (kilocalories) and servings of different types of foods and beverages served and consumed during breakfast, lunch, and snack.

STATISTICAL ANALYSES PERFORMED

Mean total energy, trans fats, sodium, sugar, and fiber served per meal were calculated across the camps, as were mean weekly frequencies of serving fruits, vegetables, meat/meat alternates, grains, milk, 100% juice, sugar-sweetened beverages, whole grains, red/highly processed meats, grain-based desserts, and salty snacks. Mean consumption was calculated per camper per day.

RESULTS

Camps served a mean (standard deviation) of 647.7 (134.3) kcal for lunch, 401.8 (149.6) kcal for breakfast, and 266.4 (150.8) kcal for snack. Most camps served red/highly processed meats, salty snacks, and grain-based desserts frequently, and rarely served vegetables or water. Children consumed little (eg, at lunch, 36.5% of fruit portions, 35.0% of meat/meat alternative portions, and 37.6% of milk portions served) except for salty snacks (66.9% of portions) and grain-based desserts (64.1% of portions). Sugar-sweetened beverages and salty snacks were frequently brought to camp. One-quarter of campers drank nothing throughout the entire camp day.

CONCLUSIONS

The nutritional quality of foods and beverages served at summer day camps could be improved. Future studies should assess barriers to consumption of healthy foods and beverages in these settings.

Authors

No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

28330733

Citation

Kenney, Erica L., et al. "What Do Children Eat in the Summer? a Direct Observation of Summer Day Camps That Serve Meals." Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, vol. 117, no. 7, 2017, pp. 1097-1103.
Kenney EL, Lee RM, Brooks CJ, et al. What Do Children Eat in the Summer? A Direct Observation of Summer Day Camps That Serve Meals. J Acad Nutr Diet. 2017;117(7):1097-1103.
Kenney, E. L., Lee, R. M., Brooks, C. J., Cradock, A. L., & Gortmaker, S. L. (2017). What Do Children Eat in the Summer? A Direct Observation of Summer Day Camps That Serve Meals. Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, 117(7), 1097-1103. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jand.2017.01.026
Kenney EL, et al. What Do Children Eat in the Summer? a Direct Observation of Summer Day Camps That Serve Meals. J Acad Nutr Diet. 2017;117(7):1097-1103. PubMed PMID: 28330733.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - What Do Children Eat in the Summer? A Direct Observation of Summer Day Camps That Serve Meals. AU - Kenney,Erica L, AU - Lee,Rebekka M, AU - Brooks,Carolyn J, AU - Cradock,Angie L, AU - Gortmaker,Steven L, Y1 - 2017/03/17/ PY - 2016/09/06/received PY - 2017/01/24/accepted PY - 2017/3/24/pubmed PY - 2017/7/28/medline PY - 2017/3/24/entrez KW - Children KW - Dietary intake KW - Direct observation KW - Hydration KW - Summer camp SP - 1097 EP - 1103 JF - Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics JO - J Acad Nutr Diet VL - 117 IS - 7 N2 - BACKGROUND: More than 14 million children in the United States attend summer camp annually, yet little is known about the food environment in day camps. OBJECTIVE: Our aim was to describe the nutritional quality of meals served to, brought by, and consumed by children attending summer day camps serving meals and snacks, and to describe camp water access. DESIGN: We conducted a cross-sectional study. PARTICIPANTS/SETTINGS: Participants were 149 children attending five summer camps in Boston, MA, in 2013. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Foods and beverages served were observed for 5 consecutive days. For 2 days, children's dietary intake was directly observed using a validated protocol. Outcome measures included total energy (kilocalories) and servings of different types of foods and beverages served and consumed during breakfast, lunch, and snack. STATISTICAL ANALYSES PERFORMED: Mean total energy, trans fats, sodium, sugar, and fiber served per meal were calculated across the camps, as were mean weekly frequencies of serving fruits, vegetables, meat/meat alternates, grains, milk, 100% juice, sugar-sweetened beverages, whole grains, red/highly processed meats, grain-based desserts, and salty snacks. Mean consumption was calculated per camper per day. RESULTS: Camps served a mean (standard deviation) of 647.7 (134.3) kcal for lunch, 401.8 (149.6) kcal for breakfast, and 266.4 (150.8) kcal for snack. Most camps served red/highly processed meats, salty snacks, and grain-based desserts frequently, and rarely served vegetables or water. Children consumed little (eg, at lunch, 36.5% of fruit portions, 35.0% of meat/meat alternative portions, and 37.6% of milk portions served) except for salty snacks (66.9% of portions) and grain-based desserts (64.1% of portions). Sugar-sweetened beverages and salty snacks were frequently brought to camp. One-quarter of campers drank nothing throughout the entire camp day. CONCLUSIONS: The nutritional quality of foods and beverages served at summer day camps could be improved. Future studies should assess barriers to consumption of healthy foods and beverages in these settings. SN - 2212-2672 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/28330733/What_Do_Children_Eat_in_the_Summer_A_Direct_Observation_of_Summer_Day_Camps_That_Serve_Meals_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S2212-2672(17)30108-9 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -