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Burkholderia pseudomallei and Burkholderia mallei vaccines: Are we close to clinical trials?
Vaccine. 2017 10 20; 35(44):5981-5989.V

Abstract

B. pseudomallei is the cause of melioidosis, a serious an often fatal disease of humans and animals. The closely related bacterium B. mallei, which cases glanders, is considered to be a clonal derivative of B. pseudomallei. Both B. pseudomallei and B. mallei were evaluated by the United States and the former USSR as potential bioweapons. Much of the effort to devise biodefence vaccines in the past decade has been directed towards the identification and formulation of sub-unit vaccines which could protect against both melioidosis and glanders. A wide range of proteins and polysaccharides have been identified which protective immunity in mice. In this review we highlight the significant progress that has been made in developing glycoconjugates as sub-unit vaccines. We also consider some of the important the criteria for licensing, including the suitability of the "animal rule" for assessing vaccine efficacy, the protection required from a vaccine and the how correlates of protection will be identified. Vaccines developed for biodefence purposes could also be used in regions of the world where naturally occurring disease is endemic.

Authors+Show Affiliations

College of Life and Environmental Sciences, Biosciences, University of Exeter, Exeter, EX4 4QD Devon, United Kingdom. Electronic address: r.w.titball@exeter.ac.uk.Department of Microbiology and Immunology, University of South Alabama, Mobile, AL 36688, United States.Department of Immunology and Infection, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, Keppel Street, London WC1E 7HT, United Kingdom.Department of Microbiology and Immunology, University of South Alabama, Mobile, AL 36688, United States.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

28336210

Citation

Titball, Richard W., et al. "Burkholderia Pseudomallei and Burkholderia Mallei Vaccines: Are We Close to Clinical Trials?" Vaccine, vol. 35, no. 44, 2017, pp. 5981-5989.
Titball RW, Burtnick MN, Bancroft GJ, et al. Burkholderia pseudomallei and Burkholderia mallei vaccines: Are we close to clinical trials? Vaccine. 2017;35(44):5981-5989.
Titball, R. W., Burtnick, M. N., Bancroft, G. J., & Brett, P. (2017). Burkholderia pseudomallei and Burkholderia mallei vaccines: Are we close to clinical trials? Vaccine, 35(44), 5981-5989. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.vaccine.2017.03.022
Titball RW, et al. Burkholderia Pseudomallei and Burkholderia Mallei Vaccines: Are We Close to Clinical Trials. Vaccine. 2017 10 20;35(44):5981-5989. PubMed PMID: 28336210.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Burkholderia pseudomallei and Burkholderia mallei vaccines: Are we close to clinical trials? AU - Titball,Richard W, AU - Burtnick,Mary N, AU - Bancroft,Gregory J, AU - Brett,Paul, Y1 - 2017/03/21/ PY - 2017/01/04/received PY - 2017/02/17/revised PY - 2017/03/07/accepted PY - 2017/3/25/pubmed PY - 2018/3/15/medline PY - 2017/3/25/entrez KW - Bioterrorism KW - Biowarfare KW - Melioidosis KW - Vaccine SP - 5981 EP - 5989 JF - Vaccine JO - Vaccine VL - 35 IS - 44 N2 - B. pseudomallei is the cause of melioidosis, a serious an often fatal disease of humans and animals. The closely related bacterium B. mallei, which cases glanders, is considered to be a clonal derivative of B. pseudomallei. Both B. pseudomallei and B. mallei were evaluated by the United States and the former USSR as potential bioweapons. Much of the effort to devise biodefence vaccines in the past decade has been directed towards the identification and formulation of sub-unit vaccines which could protect against both melioidosis and glanders. A wide range of proteins and polysaccharides have been identified which protective immunity in mice. In this review we highlight the significant progress that has been made in developing glycoconjugates as sub-unit vaccines. We also consider some of the important the criteria for licensing, including the suitability of the "animal rule" for assessing vaccine efficacy, the protection required from a vaccine and the how correlates of protection will be identified. Vaccines developed for biodefence purposes could also be used in regions of the world where naturally occurring disease is endemic. SN - 1873-2518 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/28336210/Burkholderia_pseudomallei_and_Burkholderia_mallei_vaccines:_Are_we_close_to_clinical_trials L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0264-410X(17)30328-6 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -