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Preparing the United States for Zika Virus: Pre-emptive Vector Control and Personal Protection.
Wilderness Environ Med 2016; 27(4):450-457WE

Abstract

Discovered in 1947 in a monkey in the Zika forest of Uganda, Zika virus was dismissed as a cause of a mild illness that was confined to Africa and Southeast Asia and transmitted by Aedes mosquitoes. In 2007, Zika virus appeared outside of its endemic borders in an outbreak on the South Pacific Island of Yap. In 2013, Zika virus was associated with a major neurological complication, Guillain-Barré syndrome, in a larger outbreak in the French Polynesian Islands. From the South Pacific, Zika invaded Brazil in 2015 and caused another severe neurological complication, fetal microcephaly. The mosquito-borne transmission of Zika virus can be propagated by sexual transmission and, possibly, by blood transfusions, close personal contacts, and organ transplants, like other flaviviruses. Since these combined mechanisms of infectious disease transmission could result in catastrophic incidences of severe neurological diseases in adults and children, the public should know what to expect from Zika virus, how to prevent infection, and what the most likely failures in preventive measures will be. With federal research funding stalled, a Zika vaccine is far away. The only national strategies to prepare the United States for Zika virus invasion now are effective vector control measures and personal protection from mosquito bites. In addition to a basic knowledge of Aedes mosquito vectors and their biting behaviors, an understanding of simple household vector control measures, and the selection of the best chemical and physical mosquito repellents will be required to repel the Zika threat.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Program in Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences, School of Public Health, Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center, New Orleans, LA. Electronic address: jdiaz@lsuhsc.edu.

Pub Type(s)

Editorial

Language

eng

PubMed ID

28340908

Citation

Diaz, James H.. "Preparing the United States for Zika Virus: Pre-emptive Vector Control and Personal Protection." Wilderness & Environmental Medicine, vol. 27, no. 4, 2016, pp. 450-457.
Diaz JH. Preparing the United States for Zika Virus: Pre-emptive Vector Control and Personal Protection. Wilderness Environ Med. 2016;27(4):450-457.
Diaz, J. H. (2016). Preparing the United States for Zika Virus: Pre-emptive Vector Control and Personal Protection. Wilderness & Environmental Medicine, 27(4), pp. 450-457. doi:10.1016/j.wem.2016.07.006.
Diaz JH. Preparing the United States for Zika Virus: Pre-emptive Vector Control and Personal Protection. Wilderness Environ Med. 2016;27(4):450-457. PubMed PMID: 28340908.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Preparing the United States for Zika Virus: Pre-emptive Vector Control and Personal Protection. A1 - Diaz,James H, Y1 - 2016/10/27/ PY - 2016/05/17/received PY - 2016/07/26/revised PY - 2016/07/29/accepted PY - 2017/3/26/entrez PY - 2017/3/28/pubmed PY - 2017/6/16/medline KW - Aedes aegypti KW - Aedes albopictus KW - Zika virus KW - arboviruses KW - mosquito-borne infectious diseases SP - 450 EP - 457 JF - Wilderness & environmental medicine JO - Wilderness Environ Med VL - 27 IS - 4 N2 - Discovered in 1947 in a monkey in the Zika forest of Uganda, Zika virus was dismissed as a cause of a mild illness that was confined to Africa and Southeast Asia and transmitted by Aedes mosquitoes. In 2007, Zika virus appeared outside of its endemic borders in an outbreak on the South Pacific Island of Yap. In 2013, Zika virus was associated with a major neurological complication, Guillain-Barré syndrome, in a larger outbreak in the French Polynesian Islands. From the South Pacific, Zika invaded Brazil in 2015 and caused another severe neurological complication, fetal microcephaly. The mosquito-borne transmission of Zika virus can be propagated by sexual transmission and, possibly, by blood transfusions, close personal contacts, and organ transplants, like other flaviviruses. Since these combined mechanisms of infectious disease transmission could result in catastrophic incidences of severe neurological diseases in adults and children, the public should know what to expect from Zika virus, how to prevent infection, and what the most likely failures in preventive measures will be. With federal research funding stalled, a Zika vaccine is far away. The only national strategies to prepare the United States for Zika virus invasion now are effective vector control measures and personal protection from mosquito bites. In addition to a basic knowledge of Aedes mosquito vectors and their biting behaviors, an understanding of simple household vector control measures, and the selection of the best chemical and physical mosquito repellents will be required to repel the Zika threat. SN - 1545-1534 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/28340908/Preparing_the_United_States_for_Zika_Virus:_Pre_emptive_Vector_Control_and_Personal_Protection_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S1080-6032(16)30184-3 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -