Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Effect of probiotic on innate inflammatory response and viral shedding in experimental rhinovirus infection - a randomised controlled trial.

Abstract

Ingestion of probiotics appears to have modest effects on the incidence of viral respiratory infection. The mechanism of these effects is not clear; however, there is evidence from animal models that the probiotic may have an effect on innate immune responses to pathogens. The purpose of this randomised, placebo-controlled study was to determine the effect of administration of Bifidobacterium animalis subspecies lactis Bl-04 on innate and adaptive host responses to experimental rhinovirus challenge. The effect on the response of chemokine (C-X-C motif) ligand 8 (CXCL8) to rhinovirus infection was defined as the primary endpoint for the study. 152 seronegative volunteers who had been supplemented for 28 days, 73 with probiotic and 79 with placebo, were challenged with RV-A39. Supplement or placebo administration was then continued for five days during collection of specimens for assessment of host response, infection, and symptoms. 58 probiotic and 57 placebo-supplemented volunteers met protocol-defined criteria for analysis. Probiotic resulted in higher nasal lavage CXCL8 on day 0 prior to virus challenge (90 vs 58 pg/ml, respectively, P=0.04, ANCOVA). The CXCL8 response to rhinovirus infection in nasal lavage was significantly reduced in the probiotic treated group (P=0.03, ANCOVA). Probiotic was also associated with a reduction in nasal lavage virus titre and the proportion of subjects shedding virus in nasal secretions (76% in the probiotic group, 91% in the placebo group, P=0.04, Fisher Exact test). The administration of probiotic did not influence lower respiratory inflammation (assessed by exhaled nitric oxide), subjective symptom scores, or infection rate. This study demonstrates that ingestion of Bl-04 may have an effect on the baseline state of innate immunity in the nose and on the subsequent response of the human host to rhinovirus infection. Clinicaltrials.gov registry number: NCT01669603.

Links

  • PMC Free PDF
  • PMC Free Full Text
  • Publisher Full Text
  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    1 Departments of Pediatrics, University of Virginia School of Medicine, P.O. Box 800386, Charlottesville, 22908 VA, USA.

    ,

    2 Department of Medicine, University of Virginia School of Medicine, P.O. Box 801355, Charlottesville, 22908 VA, USA.

    ,

    2 Department of Medicine, University of Virginia School of Medicine, P.O. Box 801355, Charlottesville, 22908 VA, USA. 3 Department of Microbiology, Immunology and Cancer Biology, University of Virginia School of Medicine, Charlottesville, P.O. Box 800734, 22908 VA, USA.

    ,

    2 Department of Medicine, University of Virginia School of Medicine, P.O. Box 801355, Charlottesville, 22908 VA, USA.

    ,

    4 Department of Public Health Sciences, University of Virginia School of Medicine, P.O. Box 800717, Charlottesville, 22908 VA, USA.

    ,

    2 Department of Medicine, University of Virginia School of Medicine, P.O. Box 801355, Charlottesville, 22908 VA, USA.

    ,

    5 DuPont Nutrition and Health, Kantvik Active Nutrition, Sokeritehtaantie 20, 02460 Kantvik, Finland.

    5 DuPont Nutrition and Health, Kantvik Active Nutrition, Sokeritehtaantie 20, 02460 Kantvik, Finland.

    Source

    Beneficial microbes 8:2 2017 Apr 26 pg 207-215

    MeSH

    Adaptive Immunity
    Adult
    Bifidobacterium animalis
    Common Cold
    Dietary Supplements
    Double-Blind Method
    Female
    Humans
    Immunity, Innate
    Inflammation
    Interleukin-6
    Interleukin-8
    Male
    Nasal Lavage Fluid
    Placebos
    Probiotics
    Rhinovirus
    Virus Shedding

    Pub Type(s)

    Journal Article
    Randomized Controlled Trial

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    28343401

    Citation

    Turner, R B., et al. "Effect of Probiotic On Innate Inflammatory Response and Viral Shedding in Experimental Rhinovirus Infection - a Randomised Controlled Trial." Beneficial Microbes, vol. 8, no. 2, 2017, pp. 207-215.
    Turner RB, Woodfolk JA, Borish L, et al. Effect of probiotic on innate inflammatory response and viral shedding in experimental rhinovirus infection - a randomised controlled trial. Benef Microbes. 2017;8(2):207-215.
    Turner, R. B., Woodfolk, J. A., Borish, L., Steinke, J. W., Patrie, J. T., Muehling, L. M., ... Lehtinen, M. J. (2017). Effect of probiotic on innate inflammatory response and viral shedding in experimental rhinovirus infection - a randomised controlled trial. Beneficial Microbes, 8(2), pp. 207-215. doi:10.3920/BM2016.0160.
    Turner RB, et al. Effect of Probiotic On Innate Inflammatory Response and Viral Shedding in Experimental Rhinovirus Infection - a Randomised Controlled Trial. Benef Microbes. 2017 Apr 26;8(2):207-215. PubMed PMID: 28343401.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - Effect of probiotic on innate inflammatory response and viral shedding in experimental rhinovirus infection - a randomised controlled trial. AU - Turner,R B, AU - Woodfolk,J A, AU - Borish,L, AU - Steinke,J W, AU - Patrie,J T, AU - Muehling,L M, AU - Lahtinen,S, AU - Lehtinen,M J, Y1 - 2017/03/27/ PY - 2017/3/28/pubmed PY - 2017/12/30/medline PY - 2017/3/28/entrez KW - common cold KW - innate immunity KW - upper respiratory infection SP - 207 EP - 215 JF - Beneficial microbes JO - Benef Microbes VL - 8 IS - 2 N2 - Ingestion of probiotics appears to have modest effects on the incidence of viral respiratory infection. The mechanism of these effects is not clear; however, there is evidence from animal models that the probiotic may have an effect on innate immune responses to pathogens. The purpose of this randomised, placebo-controlled study was to determine the effect of administration of Bifidobacterium animalis subspecies lactis Bl-04 on innate and adaptive host responses to experimental rhinovirus challenge. The effect on the response of chemokine (C-X-C motif) ligand 8 (CXCL8) to rhinovirus infection was defined as the primary endpoint for the study. 152 seronegative volunteers who had been supplemented for 28 days, 73 with probiotic and 79 with placebo, were challenged with RV-A39. Supplement or placebo administration was then continued for five days during collection of specimens for assessment of host response, infection, and symptoms. 58 probiotic and 57 placebo-supplemented volunteers met protocol-defined criteria for analysis. Probiotic resulted in higher nasal lavage CXCL8 on day 0 prior to virus challenge (90 vs 58 pg/ml, respectively, P=0.04, ANCOVA). The CXCL8 response to rhinovirus infection in nasal lavage was significantly reduced in the probiotic treated group (P=0.03, ANCOVA). Probiotic was also associated with a reduction in nasal lavage virus titre and the proportion of subjects shedding virus in nasal secretions (76% in the probiotic group, 91% in the placebo group, P=0.04, Fisher Exact test). The administration of probiotic did not influence lower respiratory inflammation (assessed by exhaled nitric oxide), subjective symptom scores, or infection rate. This study demonstrates that ingestion of Bl-04 may have an effect on the baseline state of innate immunity in the nose and on the subsequent response of the human host to rhinovirus infection. Clinicaltrials.gov registry number: NCT01669603. SN - 1876-2891 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/28343401/full_citation L2 - http://www.wageningenacademic.com/doi/full/10.3920/BM2016.0160?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -