Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Dose-Response Association Between Physical Activity and Incident Hypertension: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Cohort Studies.
Hypertension 2017; 69(5):813-820H

Abstract

Despite the inverse association between physical activity (PA) and incident hypertension, a comprehensive assessment of the quantitative dose-response association between PA and hypertension has not been reported. We performed a meta-analysis, including dose-response analysis, to quantitatively evaluate this association. We searched PubMed and Embase databases for articles published up to November 1, 2016. Random effects generalized least squares regression models were used to assess the quantitative association between PA and hypertension risk across studies. Restricted cubic splines were used to model the dose-response association. We identified 22 articles (29 studies) investigating the risk of hypertension with leisure-time PA or total PA, including 330 222 individuals and 67 698 incident cases of hypertension. The risk of hypertension was reduced by 6% (relative risk, 0.94; 95% confidence interval, 0.92-0.96) with each 10 metabolic equivalent of task h/wk increment of leisure-time PA. We found no evidence of a nonlinear dose-response association of PA and hypertension (Pnonlinearity=0.094 for leisure-time PA and 0.771 for total PA). With the linear cubic spline model, when compared with inactive individuals, for those who met the guidelines recommended minimum level of moderate PA (10 metabolic equivalent of task h/wk), the risk of hypertension was reduced by 6% (relative risk, 0.94; 95% confidence interval, 0.92-0.97). This meta-analysis suggests that additional benefits for hypertension prevention occur as the amount of PA increases.

Authors+Show Affiliations

From the Department of Preventive Medicine, Shenzhen University Health Sciences Center, Guangdong, China (X.L., D.Z., C.H., B.W., Y.R., J.Z., Y.Z., D.H., M.Z.); The Affiliated Luohu Hospital of Shenzhen University Health Sciences Center, Guangdong, China (Y.L., X.S., C.H., B.W., Y.R., J.Z., Y.Z., D.H.); and Department of Epidemiology and Health Statistics, College of Public Health, Zhengzhou University, Henan, China (C.H., B.W., Y.R., Y.Z., Y.S.).From the Department of Preventive Medicine, Shenzhen University Health Sciences Center, Guangdong, China (X.L., D.Z., C.H., B.W., Y.R., J.Z., Y.Z., D.H., M.Z.); The Affiliated Luohu Hospital of Shenzhen University Health Sciences Center, Guangdong, China (Y.L., X.S., C.H., B.W., Y.R., J.Z., Y.Z., D.H.); and Department of Epidemiology and Health Statistics, College of Public Health, Zhengzhou University, Henan, China (C.H., B.W., Y.R., Y.Z., Y.S.).From the Department of Preventive Medicine, Shenzhen University Health Sciences Center, Guangdong, China (X.L., D.Z., C.H., B.W., Y.R., J.Z., Y.Z., D.H., M.Z.); The Affiliated Luohu Hospital of Shenzhen University Health Sciences Center, Guangdong, China (Y.L., X.S., C.H., B.W., Y.R., J.Z., Y.Z., D.H.); and Department of Epidemiology and Health Statistics, College of Public Health, Zhengzhou University, Henan, China (C.H., B.W., Y.R., Y.Z., Y.S.).From the Department of Preventive Medicine, Shenzhen University Health Sciences Center, Guangdong, China (X.L., D.Z., C.H., B.W., Y.R., J.Z., Y.Z., D.H., M.Z.); The Affiliated Luohu Hospital of Shenzhen University Health Sciences Center, Guangdong, China (Y.L., X.S., C.H., B.W., Y.R., J.Z., Y.Z., D.H.); and Department of Epidemiology and Health Statistics, College of Public Health, Zhengzhou University, Henan, China (C.H., B.W., Y.R., Y.Z., Y.S.).From the Department of Preventive Medicine, Shenzhen University Health Sciences Center, Guangdong, China (X.L., D.Z., C.H., B.W., Y.R., J.Z., Y.Z., D.H., M.Z.); The Affiliated Luohu Hospital of Shenzhen University Health Sciences Center, Guangdong, China (Y.L., X.S., C.H., B.W., Y.R., J.Z., Y.Z., D.H.); and Department of Epidemiology and Health Statistics, College of Public Health, Zhengzhou University, Henan, China (C.H., B.W., Y.R., Y.Z., Y.S.).From the Department of Preventive Medicine, Shenzhen University Health Sciences Center, Guangdong, China (X.L., D.Z., C.H., B.W., Y.R., J.Z., Y.Z., D.H., M.Z.); The Affiliated Luohu Hospital of Shenzhen University Health Sciences Center, Guangdong, China (Y.L., X.S., C.H., B.W., Y.R., J.Z., Y.Z., D.H.); and Department of Epidemiology and Health Statistics, College of Public Health, Zhengzhou University, Henan, China (C.H., B.W., Y.R., Y.Z., Y.S.).From the Department of Preventive Medicine, Shenzhen University Health Sciences Center, Guangdong, China (X.L., D.Z., C.H., B.W., Y.R., J.Z., Y.Z., D.H., M.Z.); The Affiliated Luohu Hospital of Shenzhen University Health Sciences Center, Guangdong, China (Y.L., X.S., C.H., B.W., Y.R., J.Z., Y.Z., D.H.); and Department of Epidemiology and Health Statistics, College of Public Health, Zhengzhou University, Henan, China (C.H., B.W., Y.R., Y.Z., Y.S.).From the Department of Preventive Medicine, Shenzhen University Health Sciences Center, Guangdong, China (X.L., D.Z., C.H., B.W., Y.R., J.Z., Y.Z., D.H., M.Z.); The Affiliated Luohu Hospital of Shenzhen University Health Sciences Center, Guangdong, China (Y.L., X.S., C.H., B.W., Y.R., J.Z., Y.Z., D.H.); and Department of Epidemiology and Health Statistics, College of Public Health, Zhengzhou University, Henan, China (C.H., B.W., Y.R., Y.Z., Y.S.).From the Department of Preventive Medicine, Shenzhen University Health Sciences Center, Guangdong, China (X.L., D.Z., C.H., B.W., Y.R., J.Z., Y.Z., D.H., M.Z.); The Affiliated Luohu Hospital of Shenzhen University Health Sciences Center, Guangdong, China (Y.L., X.S., C.H., B.W., Y.R., J.Z., Y.Z., D.H.); and Department of Epidemiology and Health Statistics, College of Public Health, Zhengzhou University, Henan, China (C.H., B.W., Y.R., Y.Z., Y.S.).From the Department of Preventive Medicine, Shenzhen University Health Sciences Center, Guangdong, China (X.L., D.Z., C.H., B.W., Y.R., J.Z., Y.Z., D.H., M.Z.); The Affiliated Luohu Hospital of Shenzhen University Health Sciences Center, Guangdong, China (Y.L., X.S., C.H., B.W., Y.R., J.Z., Y.Z., D.H.); and Department of Epidemiology and Health Statistics, College of Public Health, Zhengzhou University, Henan, China (C.H., B.W., Y.R., Y.Z., Y.S.).From the Department of Preventive Medicine, Shenzhen University Health Sciences Center, Guangdong, China (X.L., D.Z., C.H., B.W., Y.R., J.Z., Y.Z., D.H., M.Z.); The Affiliated Luohu Hospital of Shenzhen University Health Sciences Center, Guangdong, China (Y.L., X.S., C.H., B.W., Y.R., J.Z., Y.Z., D.H.); and Department of Epidemiology and Health Statistics, College of Public Health, Zhengzhou University, Henan, China (C.H., B.W., Y.R., Y.Z., Y.S.).From the Department of Preventive Medicine, Shenzhen University Health Sciences Center, Guangdong, China (X.L., D.Z., C.H., B.W., Y.R., J.Z., Y.Z., D.H., M.Z.); The Affiliated Luohu Hospital of Shenzhen University Health Sciences Center, Guangdong, China (Y.L., X.S., C.H., B.W., Y.R., J.Z., Y.Z., D.H.); and Department of Epidemiology and Health Statistics, College of Public Health, Zhengzhou University, Henan, China (C.H., B.W., Y.R., Y.Z., Y.S.). zhangming@szu.edu.cn.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Meta-Analysis
Review
Systematic Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

28348016

Citation

Liu, Xuejiao, et al. "Dose-Response Association Between Physical Activity and Incident Hypertension: a Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Cohort Studies." Hypertension (Dallas, Tex. : 1979), vol. 69, no. 5, 2017, pp. 813-820.
Liu X, Zhang D, Liu Y, et al. Dose-Response Association Between Physical Activity and Incident Hypertension: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Cohort Studies. Hypertension. 2017;69(5):813-820.
Liu, X., Zhang, D., Liu, Y., Sun, X., Han, C., Wang, B., ... Zhang, M. (2017). Dose-Response Association Between Physical Activity and Incident Hypertension: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Cohort Studies. Hypertension (Dallas, Tex. : 1979), 69(5), pp. 813-820. doi:10.1161/HYPERTENSIONAHA.116.08994.
Liu X, et al. Dose-Response Association Between Physical Activity and Incident Hypertension: a Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Cohort Studies. Hypertension. 2017;69(5):813-820. PubMed PMID: 28348016.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Dose-Response Association Between Physical Activity and Incident Hypertension: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Cohort Studies. AU - Liu,Xuejiao, AU - Zhang,Dongdong, AU - Liu,Yu, AU - Sun,Xizhuo, AU - Han,Chengyi, AU - Wang,Bingyuan, AU - Ren,Yongcheng, AU - Zhou,Junmei, AU - Zhao,Yang, AU - Shi,Yuanyuan, AU - Hu,Dongsheng, AU - Zhang,Ming, Y1 - 2017/03/27/ PY - 2016/12/26/received PY - 2017/01/11/revised PY - 2017/02/20/accepted PY - 2017/3/30/pubmed PY - 2017/4/30/medline PY - 2017/3/29/entrez KW - cohort studies KW - exercise KW - hypertension KW - meta-analysis KW - risk SP - 813 EP - 820 JF - Hypertension (Dallas, Tex. : 1979) JO - Hypertension VL - 69 IS - 5 N2 - Despite the inverse association between physical activity (PA) and incident hypertension, a comprehensive assessment of the quantitative dose-response association between PA and hypertension has not been reported. We performed a meta-analysis, including dose-response analysis, to quantitatively evaluate this association. We searched PubMed and Embase databases for articles published up to November 1, 2016. Random effects generalized least squares regression models were used to assess the quantitative association between PA and hypertension risk across studies. Restricted cubic splines were used to model the dose-response association. We identified 22 articles (29 studies) investigating the risk of hypertension with leisure-time PA or total PA, including 330 222 individuals and 67 698 incident cases of hypertension. The risk of hypertension was reduced by 6% (relative risk, 0.94; 95% confidence interval, 0.92-0.96) with each 10 metabolic equivalent of task h/wk increment of leisure-time PA. We found no evidence of a nonlinear dose-response association of PA and hypertension (Pnonlinearity=0.094 for leisure-time PA and 0.771 for total PA). With the linear cubic spline model, when compared with inactive individuals, for those who met the guidelines recommended minimum level of moderate PA (10 metabolic equivalent of task h/wk), the risk of hypertension was reduced by 6% (relative risk, 0.94; 95% confidence interval, 0.92-0.97). This meta-analysis suggests that additional benefits for hypertension prevention occur as the amount of PA increases. SN - 1524-4563 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/28348016/Dose_Response_Association_Between_Physical_Activity_and_Incident_Hypertension:_A_Systematic_Review_and_Meta_Analysis_of_Cohort_Studies_ L2 - http://www.ahajournals.org/doi/full/10.1161/HYPERTENSIONAHA.116.08994?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -