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Comparison of the effects of commercial coated and uncoated ZnO nanomaterials and Zn compounds in kidney bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) plants.
J Hazard Mater. 2017 Jun 15; 332:214-222.JH

Abstract

Bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) plants were grown for 45 days in soil amended with either uncoated (Z-COTE®) and coated (Z-COTE HP1®) ZnO nanomaterials (NMs), bulk ZnO and ZnCl2, at 0-500mg/kg. At harvest, growth parameters, chlorophyll, and essential elements were determined. None of the treatments affected germination and pod production, and only ZnCl2 at 250 and 500mg/kg reduced relative chlorophyll content by 34% and 46%, respectively. While Z-COTE® did not produce phenotypic changes, Z-COTE HP1®, at all concentrations, increased root length (∼44%) and leaf length (∼13%) compared with control. Bulk ZnO reduced root length (53%) at 62.5mg/kg and ZnCl2 reduced leaf length (16%) at 125mg/kg. Z-COTE®, at 125mg/kg, increased Zn by 203%, 139%, and 76% in nodules, stems, and leaves, respectively; while at the same concentration, Z-COTE HP1® increased Zn by 89%, 97%, and 103% in roots, stems, and leaves, respectively. At 125mg/kg, Z-COTE HP1® increased root S (65%) and Mg (65%), while Z-COTE® increased stem B (122%) and Mn (73%). Bulk ZnO and ZnCl2 imposed more toxicity to kidney bean than the NMs, since they reduced root and leaf elongation, respectively, and the concentration of several essential elements in tissues.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Chemistry, The University of Texas at El Paso, 500 West University Avenue, El Paso, TX 79968, United States; University of California Center for Environmental Implications of Nanotechnology (UC CEIN), The University of Texas at El Paso, 500 West University Avenue, El Paso, TX 79968, United States.Department of Chemistry, The University of Texas at El Paso, 500 West University Avenue, El Paso, TX 79968, United States; University of California Center for Environmental Implications of Nanotechnology (UC CEIN), The University of Texas at El Paso, 500 West University Avenue, El Paso, TX 79968, United States.Metallurgical and Materials Engineering Department, The University of Texas at El Paso, 500 West University Avenue, El Paso, TX 79968, United States; University of California Center for Environmental Implications of Nanotechnology (UC CEIN), The University of Texas at El Paso, 500 West University Avenue, El Paso, TX 79968, United States.Department of Chemistry, The University of Texas at El Paso, 500 West University Avenue, El Paso, TX 79968, United States; University of California Center for Environmental Implications of Nanotechnology (UC CEIN), The University of Texas at El Paso, 500 West University Avenue, El Paso, TX 79968, United States.University of California Center for Environmental Implications of Nanotechnology (UC CEIN), California NanoSystems Institute, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095, United States.University of California Center for Environmental Implications of Nanotechnology (UC CEIN), California NanoSystems Institute, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095, United States.University of California Center for Environmental Implications of Nanotechnology (UC CEIN), California NanoSystems Institute, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095, United States; Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095, United States.Department of Chemistry, The University of Texas at El Paso, 500 West University Avenue, El Paso, TX 79968, United States; Environmental Science and Engineering Ph.D. Program, The University of Texas at El Paso, 500 West University Avenue, El Paso, TX 79968, United States; University of California Center for Environmental Implications of Nanotechnology (UC CEIN), The University of Texas at El Paso, 500 West University Avenue, El Paso, TX 79968, United States.Department of Chemistry, The University of Texas at El Paso, 500 West University Avenue, El Paso, TX 79968, United States; Environmental Science and Engineering Ph.D. Program, The University of Texas at El Paso, 500 West University Avenue, El Paso, TX 79968, United States; University of California Center for Environmental Implications of Nanotechnology (UC CEIN), The University of Texas at El Paso, 500 West University Avenue, El Paso, TX 79968, United States. Electronic address: jgardea@utep.edu.

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

28359954

Citation

Medina-Velo, Illya A., et al. "Comparison of the Effects of Commercial Coated and Uncoated ZnO Nanomaterials and Zn Compounds in Kidney Bean (Phaseolus Vulgaris) Plants." Journal of Hazardous Materials, vol. 332, 2017, pp. 214-222.
Medina-Velo IA, Barrios AC, Zuverza-Mena N, et al. Comparison of the effects of commercial coated and uncoated ZnO nanomaterials and Zn compounds in kidney bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) plants. J Hazard Mater. 2017;332:214-222.
Medina-Velo, I. A., Barrios, A. C., Zuverza-Mena, N., Hernandez-Viezcas, J. A., Chang, C. H., Ji, Z., Zink, J. I., Peralta-Videa, J. R., & Gardea-Torresdey, J. L. (2017). Comparison of the effects of commercial coated and uncoated ZnO nanomaterials and Zn compounds in kidney bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) plants. Journal of Hazardous Materials, 332, 214-222. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jhazmat.2017.03.008
Medina-Velo IA, et al. Comparison of the Effects of Commercial Coated and Uncoated ZnO Nanomaterials and Zn Compounds in Kidney Bean (Phaseolus Vulgaris) Plants. J Hazard Mater. 2017 Jun 15;332:214-222. PubMed PMID: 28359954.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Comparison of the effects of commercial coated and uncoated ZnO nanomaterials and Zn compounds in kidney bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) plants. AU - Medina-Velo,Illya A, AU - Barrios,Ana C, AU - Zuverza-Mena,Nubia, AU - Hernandez-Viezcas,Jose A, AU - Chang,Chong Hyun, AU - Ji,Zhaoxia, AU - Zink,Jeffrey I, AU - Peralta-Videa,Jose R, AU - Gardea-Torresdey,Jorge L, Y1 - 2017/03/06/ PY - 2016/11/09/received PY - 2017/02/21/revised PY - 2017/03/04/accepted PY - 2017/4/1/pubmed PY - 2018/9/14/medline PY - 2017/4/1/entrez KW - Essential elements KW - Plant growth KW - Red kidney bean KW - Surface coating KW - ZnO nanomaterials SP - 214 EP - 222 JF - Journal of hazardous materials JO - J Hazard Mater VL - 332 N2 - Bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) plants were grown for 45 days in soil amended with either uncoated (Z-COTE®) and coated (Z-COTE HP1®) ZnO nanomaterials (NMs), bulk ZnO and ZnCl2, at 0-500mg/kg. At harvest, growth parameters, chlorophyll, and essential elements were determined. None of the treatments affected germination and pod production, and only ZnCl2 at 250 and 500mg/kg reduced relative chlorophyll content by 34% and 46%, respectively. While Z-COTE® did not produce phenotypic changes, Z-COTE HP1®, at all concentrations, increased root length (∼44%) and leaf length (∼13%) compared with control. Bulk ZnO reduced root length (53%) at 62.5mg/kg and ZnCl2 reduced leaf length (16%) at 125mg/kg. Z-COTE®, at 125mg/kg, increased Zn by 203%, 139%, and 76% in nodules, stems, and leaves, respectively; while at the same concentration, Z-COTE HP1® increased Zn by 89%, 97%, and 103% in roots, stems, and leaves, respectively. At 125mg/kg, Z-COTE HP1® increased root S (65%) and Mg (65%), while Z-COTE® increased stem B (122%) and Mn (73%). Bulk ZnO and ZnCl2 imposed more toxicity to kidney bean than the NMs, since they reduced root and leaf elongation, respectively, and the concentration of several essential elements in tissues. SN - 1873-3336 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/28359954/Comparison_of_the_effects_of_commercial_coated_and_uncoated_ZnO_nanomaterials_and_Zn_compounds_in_kidney_bean__Phaseolus_vulgaris__plants_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0304-3894(17)30163-2 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -