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Neighborhood Factors as Predictors of Poor Sleep in the Sueño Ancillary Study of the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos.
Sleep. 2017 Jan 01; 40(1)S

Abstract

Study Objectives

To evaluate whether an adverse neighborhood environment has higher prevalence of poor sleep in a US Hispanic/Latino population.

Methods

A cross-sectional analysis was performed in 2156 US Hispanic/Latino participants aged 18-64 years from the Sueño ancillary study of the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos (HCHS/SOL). Participants completed surveys of neighborhood environment including perceived safety, violence and noise, the Insomnia Severity Index (ISI), and 7 days of wrist actigraphy.

Results

In age and sex-adjusted analyses, short sleep, low sleep efficiency, and late sleep midpoint were all more prevalent among those living in an unsafe neighborhood. After adjustment for background, site, nativity, income, employment, depressive symptoms, and sleep apnea, the absolute risk of sleeping <6 hours was 7.7 (95% CI [0.9, 14.6]) percentage points greater in those living in an unsafe compared to a safe neighborhood. There were no differences in the prevalence of insomnia by level of safety or violence. Insomnia was more prevalent among those living in a noisy neighborhood. In adjusted analysis, the absolute risk of insomnia was 4.4 (95% CI [0.4, 8.4]) percentage points greater in those living in noisy compared to non-noisy neighborhoods.

Conclusion

Using validated measures of sleep duration and insomnia, we have demonstrated the existence of a higher prevalence of short sleep and insomnia by adverse neighborhood factors. An adverse neighborhood environment is an established risk factor for a variety of poor health outcomes. Our findings suggest negative effects on sleep may represent one pathway by which neighborhood environment influences health.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Behavioral Biology Branch, Walter Reed Army Institute of Research, Silver Spring, MD.Division of Pulmonary, Critical Care, and Sleep Medicine, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, MA.Division of Sleep and Circadian Disorders, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA.Department of Psychology San Diego State University, San Diego, CA.Department of Public Policy, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC.Division of Pulmonary, Critical Care and Sleep, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, NY.School of Social Work, Columbia University, New York, NY.Center for Circadian and Sleep Medicine, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Evanston, IL.Department of Neurology, University of Miami, Miller School of Medicine, Miami, FL.Department of Psychology, University of Miami, Coral Gables, FL.Collaborative Studies Coordinating Center, Department of Biostatistics, Gillings School of Global Public Health, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC.Division of Sleep and Circadian Disorders, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA.Division of Pulmonary, Allergy and Critical Care Medicine, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

28364454

Citation

Simonelli, Guido, et al. "Neighborhood Factors as Predictors of Poor Sleep in the Sueño Ancillary Study of the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos." Sleep, vol. 40, no. 1, 2017.
Simonelli G, Dudley KA, Weng J, et al. Neighborhood Factors as Predictors of Poor Sleep in the Sueño Ancillary Study of the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos. Sleep. 2017;40(1).
Simonelli, G., Dudley, K. A., Weng, J., Gallo, L. C., Perreira, K., Shah, N. A., Alcantara, C., Zee, P. C., Ramos, A. R., Llabre, M. M., Sotres-Alvarez, D., Wang, R., & Patel, S. R. (2017). Neighborhood Factors as Predictors of Poor Sleep in the Sueño Ancillary Study of the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos. Sleep, 40(1). https://doi.org/10.1093/sleep/zsw025
Simonelli G, et al. Neighborhood Factors as Predictors of Poor Sleep in the Sueño Ancillary Study of the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos. Sleep. 2017 Jan 1;40(1) PubMed PMID: 28364454.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Neighborhood Factors as Predictors of Poor Sleep in the Sueño Ancillary Study of the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos. AU - Simonelli,Guido, AU - Dudley,Katherine A, AU - Weng,Jia, AU - Gallo,Linda C, AU - Perreira,Krista, AU - Shah,Neomi A, AU - Alcantara,Carmela, AU - Zee,Phyllis C, AU - Ramos,Alberto R, AU - Llabre,Maria M, AU - Sotres-Alvarez,Daniela, AU - Wang,Rui, AU - Patel,Sanjay R, PY - 2017/4/2/entrez PY - 2017/4/2/pubmed PY - 2017/11/3/medline KW - actigraphy. KW - insomnia KW - neighborhood KW - noise KW - safety KW - sleep JF - Sleep JO - Sleep VL - 40 IS - 1 N2 - Study Objectives: To evaluate whether an adverse neighborhood environment has higher prevalence of poor sleep in a US Hispanic/Latino population. Methods: A cross-sectional analysis was performed in 2156 US Hispanic/Latino participants aged 18-64 years from the Sueño ancillary study of the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos (HCHS/SOL). Participants completed surveys of neighborhood environment including perceived safety, violence and noise, the Insomnia Severity Index (ISI), and 7 days of wrist actigraphy. Results: In age and sex-adjusted analyses, short sleep, low sleep efficiency, and late sleep midpoint were all more prevalent among those living in an unsafe neighborhood. After adjustment for background, site, nativity, income, employment, depressive symptoms, and sleep apnea, the absolute risk of sleeping <6 hours was 7.7 (95% CI [0.9, 14.6]) percentage points greater in those living in an unsafe compared to a safe neighborhood. There were no differences in the prevalence of insomnia by level of safety or violence. Insomnia was more prevalent among those living in a noisy neighborhood. In adjusted analysis, the absolute risk of insomnia was 4.4 (95% CI [0.4, 8.4]) percentage points greater in those living in noisy compared to non-noisy neighborhoods. Conclusion: Using validated measures of sleep duration and insomnia, we have demonstrated the existence of a higher prevalence of short sleep and insomnia by adverse neighborhood factors. An adverse neighborhood environment is an established risk factor for a variety of poor health outcomes. Our findings suggest negative effects on sleep may represent one pathway by which neighborhood environment influences health. SN - 1550-9109 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/28364454/Neighborhood_Factors_as_Predictors_of_Poor_Sleep_in_the_Sueño_Ancillary_Study_of_the_Hispanic_Community_Health_Study/Study_of_Latinos_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/sleep/article-lookup/doi/10.1093/sleep/zsw025 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -