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Pre-Pregnancy Body Mass Index Is Associated with Dietary Inflammatory Index and C-Reactive Protein Concentrations during Pregnancy.
Nutrients. 2017 04 01; 9(4)N

Abstract

There have been a limited number of studies examining the association between pre-pregnancy body mass index (BMI) and dietary inflammation during pregnancy. Our aim is to examine the association between pre-pregnancy BMI and the Dietary Inflammatory Index (DII)™ and C-reactive protein (CRP) concentrations during pregnancy. The study included 631 pregnant American women from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) cross-sectional examinations from 2003 to 2012. Pre-pregnancy BMI was calculated based on self-reported pre-pregnancy weight and measured height. The cut-offs of <18.5 (underweight), 18.5-24.9 (normal), 25.0-29.9 (overweight), and ≥30 kg/m² (obese) were used to categorize the weight status of pregnant women prior to pregnancy. The DII, a literature-based dietary index to assess the inflammatory properties of diet, was estimated based on a one-day 24-h recall. Multivariable linear and logistic regressions were performed to estimate beta coefficients and the adjusted odds ratios (AORs) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) on the association of pre-pregnancy BMI categories with the DII and CRP concentrations during pregnancy. After controlling for variables including: race/ethnicity, family poverty income ratio, education, marital status, month in pregnancy, and smoking status during pregnancy; women who were obese before pregnancy (n = 136) had increased odds for being in the highest tertile of the DII and CRP concentrations compared to women with normal weight (AORs 2.40, 95% CIs 1.01-5.71; AORs 24.84, 95% CIs 6.19-99.67, respectively). These findings suggest that women with pre-pregnancy obesity had greater odds of reporting higher DII and having elevated CRP. In conclusion, high pre-pregnancy BMI was associated with increased odds of pro-inflammatory diet and elevated CRP levels during pregnancy in the USA.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Nutrition & Dietetics, College of Nursing & Professional Disciplines, University of North Dakota, Grand Forks, ND 58202, USA. dayeon.shin@und.edu.Department of Biomedical Sciences, University of North Dakota School of Medicine and Health Sciences, Grand Forks, ND 58202, USA. junguk.hur@med.und.edu.Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Department of Internal Medicine, School of Medicine, Kangwon National University, Chuncheon 24289, Korea. ehcho@kangwon.ac.kr.Department of Food and Nutrition, Hoseo University, Asan 31499, Korea. hkchung@hoseo.edu.Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, and the Cancer Prevention and Control Program, Arnold School of Public Health, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC 29208, USA. shivappa@mailbox.sc.edu. Connecting Health Innovations, LLC, Columbia, SC 29201, USA. shivappa@mailbox.sc.edu.Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, and the Cancer Prevention and Control Program, Arnold School of Public Health, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC 29208, USA. wirthm@mailbox.sc.edu. Connecting Health Innovations, LLC, Columbia, SC 29201, USA. wirthm@mailbox.sc.edu.Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, and the Cancer Prevention and Control Program, Arnold School of Public Health, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC 29208, USA. jhebert@mailbox.sc.edu. Connecting Health Innovations, LLC, Columbia, SC 29201, USA. jhebert@mailbox.sc.edu.Department of Food Science and Human Nutrition, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824, USA. kyungwlee@korea.kr.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

28368304

Citation

Shin, Dayeon, et al. "Pre-Pregnancy Body Mass Index Is Associated With Dietary Inflammatory Index and C-Reactive Protein Concentrations During Pregnancy." Nutrients, vol. 9, no. 4, 2017.
Shin D, Hur J, Cho EH, et al. Pre-Pregnancy Body Mass Index Is Associated with Dietary Inflammatory Index and C-Reactive Protein Concentrations during Pregnancy. Nutrients. 2017;9(4).
Shin, D., Hur, J., Cho, E. H., Chung, H. K., Shivappa, N., Wirth, M. D., Hébert, J. R., & Lee, K. W. (2017). Pre-Pregnancy Body Mass Index Is Associated with Dietary Inflammatory Index and C-Reactive Protein Concentrations during Pregnancy. Nutrients, 9(4). https://doi.org/10.3390/nu9040351
Shin D, et al. Pre-Pregnancy Body Mass Index Is Associated With Dietary Inflammatory Index and C-Reactive Protein Concentrations During Pregnancy. Nutrients. 2017 04 1;9(4) PubMed PMID: 28368304.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Pre-Pregnancy Body Mass Index Is Associated with Dietary Inflammatory Index and C-Reactive Protein Concentrations during Pregnancy. AU - Shin,Dayeon, AU - Hur,Junguk, AU - Cho,Eun-Hee, AU - Chung,Hae-Kyung, AU - Shivappa,Nitin, AU - Wirth,Michael D, AU - Hébert,James R, AU - Lee,Kyung Won, Y1 - 2017/04/01/ PY - 2016/12/04/received PY - 2017/03/22/revised PY - 2017/03/29/accepted PY - 2017/4/4/entrez PY - 2017/4/4/pubmed PY - 2017/8/31/medline KW - C-reactive protein KW - NHANES KW - dietary inflammatory index KW - pregnancy body mass index KW - reproductive health JF - Nutrients JO - Nutrients VL - 9 IS - 4 N2 - There have been a limited number of studies examining the association between pre-pregnancy body mass index (BMI) and dietary inflammation during pregnancy. Our aim is to examine the association between pre-pregnancy BMI and the Dietary Inflammatory Index (DII)™ and C-reactive protein (CRP) concentrations during pregnancy. The study included 631 pregnant American women from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) cross-sectional examinations from 2003 to 2012. Pre-pregnancy BMI was calculated based on self-reported pre-pregnancy weight and measured height. The cut-offs of <18.5 (underweight), 18.5-24.9 (normal), 25.0-29.9 (overweight), and ≥30 kg/m² (obese) were used to categorize the weight status of pregnant women prior to pregnancy. The DII, a literature-based dietary index to assess the inflammatory properties of diet, was estimated based on a one-day 24-h recall. Multivariable linear and logistic regressions were performed to estimate beta coefficients and the adjusted odds ratios (AORs) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) on the association of pre-pregnancy BMI categories with the DII and CRP concentrations during pregnancy. After controlling for variables including: race/ethnicity, family poverty income ratio, education, marital status, month in pregnancy, and smoking status during pregnancy; women who were obese before pregnancy (n = 136) had increased odds for being in the highest tertile of the DII and CRP concentrations compared to women with normal weight (AORs 2.40, 95% CIs 1.01-5.71; AORs 24.84, 95% CIs 6.19-99.67, respectively). These findings suggest that women with pre-pregnancy obesity had greater odds of reporting higher DII and having elevated CRP. In conclusion, high pre-pregnancy BMI was associated with increased odds of pro-inflammatory diet and elevated CRP levels during pregnancy in the USA. SN - 2072-6643 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/28368304/Pre_Pregnancy_Body_Mass_Index_Is_Associated_with_Dietary_Inflammatory_Index_and_C_Reactive_Protein_Concentrations_during_Pregnancy_ L2 - https://www.mdpi.com/resolver?pii=nu9040351 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -