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Social Integration and Reduced Risk of Coronary Heart Disease in Women: The Role of Lifestyle Behaviors.
Circ Res 2017; 120(12):1927-1937CircR

Abstract

RATIONALE

Higher social integration is associated with lower cardiovascular mortality; however, whether it is associated with incident coronary heart disease (CHD), especially in women, and whether associations differ by case fatality are unclear.

OBJECTIVES

This study sought to examine the associations between social integration and risk of incident CHD in a large female prospective cohort.

METHODS AND RESULTS

Seventy-six thousand three hundred and sixty-two women in the Nurses' Health Study, free of CHD and stroke at baseline (1992), were followed until 2014. Social integration was assessed by a simplified Berkman-Syme Social Network Index every 4 years. End points included nonfatal myocardial infarction and fatal CHD. Two thousand three hundred and seventy-two incident CHD events occurred throughout follow-up. Adjusting for demographic, health/medical risk factors, and depressive symptoms, being socially integrated was significantly associated with lower CHD risk, particularly fatal CHD. The most socially integrated women had a hazard ratio of 0.55 (95% confidence interval, 0.41-0.73) of developing fatal CHD compared with those least socially integrated (P for trend <0.0001). When additionally adjusting for lifestyle behaviors, findings for fatal CHD were maintained but attenuated (P for trend =0.02), whereas the significant associations no longer remained for nonfatal myocardial infarction. The inverse associations between social integration and nonfatal myocardial infarction risk were largely explained by health-promoting behaviors, particularly through differences in cigarette smoking; however, the association with fatal CHD risk remained after accounting for these behaviors and, thus, may involve more direct biological mechanisms.

CONCLUSIONS

Social integration is inversely associated with CHD incidence in women, but is largely explained by lifestyle/behavioral pathways.

Authors+Show Affiliations

From the Channing Division of Network Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (S.-C.C., E.B.R.); Department of Social and Behavioral Sciences (S.-C.C., M.G., S.W., I.K., L.D.K.), Department of Nutrition (E.B.R.), Department of Biostatistics (E.T.T.), and Department of Epidemiology (E.B.R.), Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, MA; Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of California, San Francisco (M.G., S.W.); and Department of Preventive Medicine, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, IL (M.C.). nhshc@channing.harvard.edu.From the Channing Division of Network Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (S.-C.C., E.B.R.); Department of Social and Behavioral Sciences (S.-C.C., M.G., S.W., I.K., L.D.K.), Department of Nutrition (E.B.R.), Department of Biostatistics (E.T.T.), and Department of Epidemiology (E.B.R.), Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, MA; Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of California, San Francisco (M.G., S.W.); and Department of Preventive Medicine, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, IL (M.C.).From the Channing Division of Network Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (S.-C.C., E.B.R.); Department of Social and Behavioral Sciences (S.-C.C., M.G., S.W., I.K., L.D.K.), Department of Nutrition (E.B.R.), Department of Biostatistics (E.T.T.), and Department of Epidemiology (E.B.R.), Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, MA; Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of California, San Francisco (M.G., S.W.); and Department of Preventive Medicine, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, IL (M.C.).From the Channing Division of Network Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (S.-C.C., E.B.R.); Department of Social and Behavioral Sciences (S.-C.C., M.G., S.W., I.K., L.D.K.), Department of Nutrition (E.B.R.), Department of Biostatistics (E.T.T.), and Department of Epidemiology (E.B.R.), Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, MA; Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of California, San Francisco (M.G., S.W.); and Department of Preventive Medicine, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, IL (M.C.).From the Channing Division of Network Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (S.-C.C., E.B.R.); Department of Social and Behavioral Sciences (S.-C.C., M.G., S.W., I.K., L.D.K.), Department of Nutrition (E.B.R.), Department of Biostatistics (E.T.T.), and Department of Epidemiology (E.B.R.), Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, MA; Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of California, San Francisco (M.G., S.W.); and Department of Preventive Medicine, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, IL (M.C.).From the Channing Division of Network Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (S.-C.C., E.B.R.); Department of Social and Behavioral Sciences (S.-C.C., M.G., S.W., I.K., L.D.K.), Department of Nutrition (E.B.R.), Department of Biostatistics (E.T.T.), and Department of Epidemiology (E.B.R.), Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, MA; Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of California, San Francisco (M.G., S.W.); and Department of Preventive Medicine, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, IL (M.C.).From the Channing Division of Network Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (S.-C.C., E.B.R.); Department of Social and Behavioral Sciences (S.-C.C., M.G., S.W., I.K., L.D.K.), Department of Nutrition (E.B.R.), Department of Biostatistics (E.T.T.), and Department of Epidemiology (E.B.R.), Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, MA; Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of California, San Francisco (M.G., S.W.); and Department of Preventive Medicine, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, IL (M.C.).From the Channing Division of Network Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (S.-C.C., E.B.R.); Department of Social and Behavioral Sciences (S.-C.C., M.G., S.W., I.K., L.D.K.), Department of Nutrition (E.B.R.), Department of Biostatistics (E.T.T.), and Department of Epidemiology (E.B.R.), Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, MA; Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of California, San Francisco (M.G., S.W.); and Department of Preventive Medicine, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, IL (M.C.).

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

28373350

Citation

Chang, Shun-Chiao, et al. "Social Integration and Reduced Risk of Coronary Heart Disease in Women: the Role of Lifestyle Behaviors." Circulation Research, vol. 120, no. 12, 2017, pp. 1927-1937.
Chang SC, Glymour M, Cornelis M, et al. Social Integration and Reduced Risk of Coronary Heart Disease in Women: The Role of Lifestyle Behaviors. Circ Res. 2017;120(12):1927-1937.
Chang, S. C., Glymour, M., Cornelis, M., Walter, S., Rimm, E. B., Tchetgen Tchetgen, E., ... Kubzansky, L. D. (2017). Social Integration and Reduced Risk of Coronary Heart Disease in Women: The Role of Lifestyle Behaviors. Circulation Research, 120(12), pp. 1927-1937. doi:10.1161/CIRCRESAHA.116.309443.
Chang SC, et al. Social Integration and Reduced Risk of Coronary Heart Disease in Women: the Role of Lifestyle Behaviors. Circ Res. 2017 Jun 9;120(12):1927-1937. PubMed PMID: 28373350.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Social Integration and Reduced Risk of Coronary Heart Disease in Women: The Role of Lifestyle Behaviors. AU - Chang,Shun-Chiao, AU - Glymour,Maria, AU - Cornelis,Marilyn, AU - Walter,Stefan, AU - Rimm,Eric B, AU - Tchetgen Tchetgen,Eric, AU - Kawachi,Ichiro, AU - Kubzansky,Laura D, Y1 - 2017/04/03/ PY - 2016/06/30/received PY - 2017/03/15/revised PY - 2017/03/30/accepted PY - 2017/4/5/pubmed PY - 2017/8/19/medline PY - 2017/4/5/entrez KW - coronary heart disease risk KW - epidemiology KW - marginal structural model KW - mediation KW - prospective cohort study KW - social integration KW - women and minorities SP - 1927 EP - 1937 JF - Circulation research JO - Circ. Res. VL - 120 IS - 12 N2 - RATIONALE: Higher social integration is associated with lower cardiovascular mortality; however, whether it is associated with incident coronary heart disease (CHD), especially in women, and whether associations differ by case fatality are unclear. OBJECTIVES: This study sought to examine the associations between social integration and risk of incident CHD in a large female prospective cohort. METHODS AND RESULTS: Seventy-six thousand three hundred and sixty-two women in the Nurses' Health Study, free of CHD and stroke at baseline (1992), were followed until 2014. Social integration was assessed by a simplified Berkman-Syme Social Network Index every 4 years. End points included nonfatal myocardial infarction and fatal CHD. Two thousand three hundred and seventy-two incident CHD events occurred throughout follow-up. Adjusting for demographic, health/medical risk factors, and depressive symptoms, being socially integrated was significantly associated with lower CHD risk, particularly fatal CHD. The most socially integrated women had a hazard ratio of 0.55 (95% confidence interval, 0.41-0.73) of developing fatal CHD compared with those least socially integrated (P for trend <0.0001). When additionally adjusting for lifestyle behaviors, findings for fatal CHD were maintained but attenuated (P for trend =0.02), whereas the significant associations no longer remained for nonfatal myocardial infarction. The inverse associations between social integration and nonfatal myocardial infarction risk were largely explained by health-promoting behaviors, particularly through differences in cigarette smoking; however, the association with fatal CHD risk remained after accounting for these behaviors and, thus, may involve more direct biological mechanisms. CONCLUSIONS: Social integration is inversely associated with CHD incidence in women, but is largely explained by lifestyle/behavioral pathways. SN - 1524-4571 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/28373350/Social_Integration_and_Reduced_Risk_of_Coronary_Heart_Disease_in_Women:_The_Role_of_Lifestyle_Behaviors_ L2 - http://www.ahajournals.org/doi/full/10.1161/CIRCRESAHA.116.309443?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&amp;rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&amp;rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -