Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Increased visual task difficulty enhances attentional capture by both visual and auditory distractor stimuli.
Brain Res. 2017 06 01; 1664:55-62.BR

Abstract

Previous studies using a three-stimulus oddball task have shown the amplitude of P3a elicited by distractor stimuli increases when perceptual discrimination between standard and target stimuli becomes difficult. This means that the attentional capture by the distractor stimuli is enhanced along with an increase in task difficulty. So far, the increase of P3a has been reported when standard, target, and distractor stimuli were presented within one sensory modality (i.e., visual or auditory). In the present study, we further investigated whether or not the increase of P3a can also be observed when the distractor stimuli are presented in a different modality from the standard and target stimuli. Twelve participants performed a three-stimulus oddball task in which they were required to discriminate between visual standard and target stimuli. As the distractor stimuli, either another visual stimulus or an auditory stimulus was presented in separate blocks. Visual distractor stimuli elicited P3a, and its amplitude increased when visual standard/target discrimination was difficult, replicating previous findings. Auditory distractor stimuli elicited P3a, and importantly, its amplitude also increased when visual standard/target discrimination was difficult. This result means that attentional capture by distractor stimuli can be enhanced even when the distractor stimuli are presented in a different modality from the standard and target stimuli. Possible mechanisms and implications are discussed in terms of the relative saliency of distractor stimuli, influences of temporal/spatial attention, and the load involved in a task.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Automotive Human Factors Research Center, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Tsukuba 305-8566, Japan. Electronic address: fumie.sugimoto@aist.go.jp.Department of Psychological Science, Kwansei Gakuin University, Nishinomiya 662-8501, Japan. Electronic address: jkatayama@kwansei.ac.jp.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

28377160

Citation

Sugimoto, Fumie, and Jun'ichi Katayama. "Increased Visual Task Difficulty Enhances Attentional Capture By Both Visual and Auditory Distractor Stimuli." Brain Research, vol. 1664, 2017, pp. 55-62.
Sugimoto F, Katayama J. Increased visual task difficulty enhances attentional capture by both visual and auditory distractor stimuli. Brain Res. 2017;1664:55-62.
Sugimoto, F., & Katayama, J. (2017). Increased visual task difficulty enhances attentional capture by both visual and auditory distractor stimuli. Brain Research, 1664, 55-62. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.brainres.2017.03.026
Sugimoto F, Katayama J. Increased Visual Task Difficulty Enhances Attentional Capture By Both Visual and Auditory Distractor Stimuli. Brain Res. 2017 06 1;1664:55-62. PubMed PMID: 28377160.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Increased visual task difficulty enhances attentional capture by both visual and auditory distractor stimuli. AU - Sugimoto,Fumie, AU - Katayama,Jun'ichi, Y1 - 2017/04/01/ PY - 2016/09/19/received PY - 2017/03/25/revised PY - 2017/03/27/accepted PY - 2017/4/6/pubmed PY - 2018/2/23/medline PY - 2017/4/6/entrez KW - Attentional capture KW - Event-related brain potentials KW - P3a KW - Task difficulty SP - 55 EP - 62 JF - Brain research JO - Brain Res VL - 1664 N2 - Previous studies using a three-stimulus oddball task have shown the amplitude of P3a elicited by distractor stimuli increases when perceptual discrimination between standard and target stimuli becomes difficult. This means that the attentional capture by the distractor stimuli is enhanced along with an increase in task difficulty. So far, the increase of P3a has been reported when standard, target, and distractor stimuli were presented within one sensory modality (i.e., visual or auditory). In the present study, we further investigated whether or not the increase of P3a can also be observed when the distractor stimuli are presented in a different modality from the standard and target stimuli. Twelve participants performed a three-stimulus oddball task in which they were required to discriminate between visual standard and target stimuli. As the distractor stimuli, either another visual stimulus or an auditory stimulus was presented in separate blocks. Visual distractor stimuli elicited P3a, and its amplitude increased when visual standard/target discrimination was difficult, replicating previous findings. Auditory distractor stimuli elicited P3a, and importantly, its amplitude also increased when visual standard/target discrimination was difficult. This result means that attentional capture by distractor stimuli can be enhanced even when the distractor stimuli are presented in a different modality from the standard and target stimuli. Possible mechanisms and implications are discussed in terms of the relative saliency of distractor stimuli, influences of temporal/spatial attention, and the load involved in a task. SN - 1872-6240 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/28377160/Increased_visual_task_difficulty_enhances_attentional_capture_by_both_visual_and_auditory_distractor_stimuli_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0006-8993(17)30141-5 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -