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Vital Signs: Update on Zika Virus-Associated Birth Defects and Evaluation of All U.S. Infants with Congenital Zika Virus Exposure - U.S. Zika Pregnancy Registry, 2016.
MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep. 2017 Apr 07; 66(13):366-373.MM

Abstract

BACKGROUND

In collaboration with state, tribal, local, and territorial health departments, CDC established the U.S. Zika Pregnancy Registry (USZPR) in early 2016 to monitor pregnant women with laboratory evidence of possible recent Zika virus infection and their infants.

METHODS

This report includes an analysis of completed pregnancies (which include live births and pregnancy losses, regardless of gestational age) in the 50 U.S. states and the District of Columbia (DC) with laboratory evidence of possible recent Zika virus infection reported to the USZPR from January 15 to December 27, 2016. Birth defects potentially associated with Zika virus infection during pregnancy include brain abnormalities and/or microcephaly, eye abnormalities, other consequences of central nervous system dysfunction, and neural tube defects and other early brain malformations.

RESULTS

During the analysis period, 1,297 pregnant women in 44 states were reported to the USZPR. Zika virus-associated birth defects were reported for 51 (5%) of the 972 fetuses/infants from completed pregnancies with laboratory evidence of possible recent Zika virus infection (95% confidence interval [CI] = 4%-7%); the proportion was higher when restricted to pregnancies with laboratory-confirmed Zika virus infection (24/250 completed pregnancies [10%, 95% CI = 7%-14%]). Birth defects were reported in 15% (95% CI = 8%-26%) of fetuses/infants of completed pregnancies with confirmed Zika virus infection in the first trimester. Among 895 liveborn infants from pregnancies with possible recent Zika virus infection, postnatal neuroimaging was reported for 221 (25%), and Zika virus testing of at least one infant specimen was reported for 585 (65%).

CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS FOR PUBLIC HEALTH PRACTICE

These findings highlight why pregnant women should avoid Zika virus exposure. Because the full clinical spectrum of congenital Zika virus infection is not yet known, all infants born to women with laboratory evidence of possible recent Zika virus infection during pregnancy should receive postnatal neuroimaging and Zika virus testing in addition to a comprehensive newborn physical exam and hearing screen. Identification and follow-up care of infants born to women with laboratory evidence of possible recent Zika virus infection during pregnancy and infants with possible congenital Zika virus infection can ensure that appropriate clinical services are available.

Authors

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Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

28384133

Citation

Reynolds, Megan R., et al. "Vital Signs: Update On Zika Virus-Associated Birth Defects and Evaluation of All U.S. Infants With Congenital Zika Virus Exposure - U.S. Zika Pregnancy Registry, 2016." MMWR. Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report, vol. 66, no. 13, 2017, pp. 366-373.
Reynolds MR, Jones AM, Petersen EE, et al. Vital Signs: Update on Zika Virus-Associated Birth Defects and Evaluation of All U.S. Infants with Congenital Zika Virus Exposure - U.S. Zika Pregnancy Registry, 2016. MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep. 2017;66(13):366-373.
Reynolds, M. R., Jones, A. M., Petersen, E. E., Lee, E. H., Rice, M. E., Bingham, A., Ellington, S. R., Evert, N., Reagan-Steiner, S., Oduyebo, T., Brown, C. M., Martin, S., Ahmad, N., Bhatnagar, J., Macdonald, J., Gould, C., Fine, A. D., Polen, K. D., Lake-Burger, H., ... Honein, M. A. (2017). Vital Signs: Update on Zika Virus-Associated Birth Defects and Evaluation of All U.S. Infants with Congenital Zika Virus Exposure - U.S. Zika Pregnancy Registry, 2016. MMWR. Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report, 66(13), 366-373. https://doi.org/10.15585/mmwr.mm6613e1
Reynolds MR, et al. Vital Signs: Update On Zika Virus-Associated Birth Defects and Evaluation of All U.S. Infants With Congenital Zika Virus Exposure - U.S. Zika Pregnancy Registry, 2016. MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep. 2017 Apr 7;66(13):366-373. PubMed PMID: 28384133.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Vital Signs: Update on Zika Virus-Associated Birth Defects and Evaluation of All U.S. Infants with Congenital Zika Virus Exposure - U.S. Zika Pregnancy Registry, 2016. AU - Reynolds,Megan R, AU - Jones,Abbey M, AU - Petersen,Emily E, AU - Lee,Ellen H, AU - Rice,Marion E, AU - Bingham,Andrea, AU - Ellington,Sascha R, AU - Evert,Nicole, AU - Reagan-Steiner,Sarah, AU - Oduyebo,Titilope, AU - Brown,Catherine M, AU - Martin,Stacey, AU - Ahmad,Nina, AU - Bhatnagar,Julu, AU - Macdonald,Jennifer, AU - Gould,Carolyn, AU - Fine,Anne D, AU - Polen,Kara D, AU - Lake-Burger,Heather, AU - Hillard,Christina L, AU - Hall,Noemi, AU - Yazdy,Mahsa M, AU - Slaughter,Karnesha, AU - Sommer,Jamie N, AU - Adamski,Alys, AU - Raycraft,Meghan, AU - Fleck-Derderian,Shannon, AU - Gupta,Jyoti, AU - Newsome,Kimberly, AU - Baez-Santiago,Madelyn, AU - Slavinski,Sally, AU - White,Jennifer L, AU - Moore,Cynthia A, AU - Shapiro-Mendoza,Carrie K, AU - Petersen,Lyle, AU - Boyle,Coleen, AU - Jamieson,Denise J, AU - Meaney-Delman,Dana, AU - Honein,Margaret A, AU - ,, Y1 - 2017/04/07/ PY - 2017/4/7/entrez PY - 2017/4/7/pubmed PY - 2017/4/22/medline SP - 366 EP - 373 JF - MMWR. Morbidity and mortality weekly report JO - MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep VL - 66 IS - 13 N2 - BACKGROUND: In collaboration with state, tribal, local, and territorial health departments, CDC established the U.S. Zika Pregnancy Registry (USZPR) in early 2016 to monitor pregnant women with laboratory evidence of possible recent Zika virus infection and their infants. METHODS: This report includes an analysis of completed pregnancies (which include live births and pregnancy losses, regardless of gestational age) in the 50 U.S. states and the District of Columbia (DC) with laboratory evidence of possible recent Zika virus infection reported to the USZPR from January 15 to December 27, 2016. Birth defects potentially associated with Zika virus infection during pregnancy include brain abnormalities and/or microcephaly, eye abnormalities, other consequences of central nervous system dysfunction, and neural tube defects and other early brain malformations. RESULTS: During the analysis period, 1,297 pregnant women in 44 states were reported to the USZPR. Zika virus-associated birth defects were reported for 51 (5%) of the 972 fetuses/infants from completed pregnancies with laboratory evidence of possible recent Zika virus infection (95% confidence interval [CI] = 4%-7%); the proportion was higher when restricted to pregnancies with laboratory-confirmed Zika virus infection (24/250 completed pregnancies [10%, 95% CI = 7%-14%]). Birth defects were reported in 15% (95% CI = 8%-26%) of fetuses/infants of completed pregnancies with confirmed Zika virus infection in the first trimester. Among 895 liveborn infants from pregnancies with possible recent Zika virus infection, postnatal neuroimaging was reported for 221 (25%), and Zika virus testing of at least one infant specimen was reported for 585 (65%). CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS FOR PUBLIC HEALTH PRACTICE: These findings highlight why pregnant women should avoid Zika virus exposure. Because the full clinical spectrum of congenital Zika virus infection is not yet known, all infants born to women with laboratory evidence of possible recent Zika virus infection during pregnancy should receive postnatal neuroimaging and Zika virus testing in addition to a comprehensive newborn physical exam and hearing screen. Identification and follow-up care of infants born to women with laboratory evidence of possible recent Zika virus infection during pregnancy and infants with possible congenital Zika virus infection can ensure that appropriate clinical services are available. SN - 1545-861X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/28384133/Vital_Signs:_Update_on_Zika_Virus_Associated_Birth_Defects_and_Evaluation_of_All_U_S__Infants_with_Congenital_Zika_Virus_Exposure___U_S__Zika_Pregnancy_Registry_2016_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.15585/mmwr.mm6613e1 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -