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Sleep and CKD in Chinese Adults: A Cross-Sectional Study.
Clin J Am Soc Nephrol 2017; 12(6):885-892CJ

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES

To assess the association between self-reported sleep duration and quality and odds of having CKD in Chinese adults on the basis of a community study.

DESIGN, SETTING, PARTICIPANTS, & MEASUREMENTS

In this cross-sectional study, we included 11,040 Chinese adults who participated in an ongoing prospective study, the Kailuan cohort. Survey questionnaire items addressed insomnia, daytime sleepiness, snoring, and sleep duration during their 2012 interview. Overall sleep quality was evaluated by summarizing these four sleep parameters. Fasting blood samples and single random midstream morning urine samples were collected in 2012 and analyzed for serum creatinine and proteinuria. CKD was defined by eGFR<60 ml/min per 1.73 m2 or proteinuria >300 mg/dl. We also examined those at high or very high risk of having CKD, on the basis of the Kidney Disease Improving Global Outcomes recommendations. The association between sleep quality and CKD was assessed using logistic regression model.

RESULTS

Worse overall sleep quality was associated with higher likelihood of being high or very high risk for CKD (multiadjusted odds ratio, 2.69; 95% confidence interval, 1.30 to 5.59 comparing two extreme categories; P trend <0.01), but not overall CKD (multiadjusted odds ratio, 1.58; 95% confidence interval, 0.89 to 2.80 comparing two extreme categories; P trend =0.46), after adjusting for potential confounders. Specifically, individuals with worse sleep quality were more likely to have proteinuria (multiadjusted odds ratio, 1.95; 95% confidence interval, 1.03 to 3.67 comparing two extreme categories; P trend =0.02), rather than lower eGFR level (multiadjusted mean eGFR levels were 96.4 and 93.6 ml/min per 1.73 m2 in the two extreme sleep categories, respectively; P trend =0.13). However, there was no statistically significant association between individual sleep parameters and CKD status.

CONCLUSIONS

Worse overall sleep quality was associated with higher odds of being high or very high risk for CKD and proteinuria in Chinese adults.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Departments of Nephrology and.Cardiology, Kailuan General Hospital Affiliated to North China University of Science and Technology, Tangshan, China.Departments of Nephrology and.College of Nursing and.Department of Cardiology, Ruijin Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, Shanghai, China.Department of Nephrology and. Clinical Epidemiology Unit, Peking Union Medical College Hospital and Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, Beijing, China; and.The Channing Division of Network Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts.Cardiology, Kailuan General Hospital Affiliated to North China University of Science and Technology, Tangshan, China; xxg14@psu.edu drwusl@163.com.Department of Nutritional Science, The Pennsylvania State University, State College, Pennsylvania; xxg14@psu.edu drwusl@163.com.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Multicenter Study

Language

eng

PubMed ID

28389618

Citation

Li, Junjuan, et al. "Sleep and CKD in Chinese Adults: a Cross-Sectional Study." Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology : CJASN, vol. 12, no. 6, 2017, pp. 885-892.
Li J, Huang Z, Hou J, et al. Sleep and CKD in Chinese Adults: A Cross-Sectional Study. Clin J Am Soc Nephrol. 2017;12(6):885-892.
Li, J., Huang, Z., Hou, J., Sawyer, A. M., Wu, Z., Cai, J., ... Gao, X. (2017). Sleep and CKD in Chinese Adults: A Cross-Sectional Study. Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology : CJASN, 12(6), pp. 885-892. doi:10.2215/CJN.09270816.
Li J, et al. Sleep and CKD in Chinese Adults: a Cross-Sectional Study. Clin J Am Soc Nephrol. 2017 Jun 7;12(6):885-892. PubMed PMID: 28389618.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Sleep and CKD in Chinese Adults: A Cross-Sectional Study. AU - Li,Junjuan, AU - Huang,Zhe, AU - Hou,Jinhong, AU - Sawyer,Amy M, AU - Wu,Zhijun, AU - Cai,Jianfang, AU - Curhan,Gary, AU - Wu,Shouling, AU - Gao,Xiang, Y1 - 2017/04/07/ PY - 2016/08/31/received PY - 2017/03/11/accepted PY - 2017/4/9/pubmed PY - 2018/3/20/medline PY - 2017/4/9/entrez KW - Adult KW - Cross-Sectional Studies KW - Fasting KW - Humans KW - Kidney Function Tests KW - Logistic Models KW - Prospective Studies KW - Renal Insufficiency, Chronic KW - Self Report KW - Sleep KW - Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders KW - Snoring KW - Surveys and Questionnaires KW - chronic kidney disease KW - creatinine KW - cross-sectional study KW - glomerular filtration rate KW - proteinuria SP - 885 EP - 892 JF - Clinical journal of the American Society of Nephrology : CJASN JO - Clin J Am Soc Nephrol VL - 12 IS - 6 N2 - BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: To assess the association between self-reported sleep duration and quality and odds of having CKD in Chinese adults on the basis of a community study. DESIGN, SETTING, PARTICIPANTS, & MEASUREMENTS: In this cross-sectional study, we included 11,040 Chinese adults who participated in an ongoing prospective study, the Kailuan cohort. Survey questionnaire items addressed insomnia, daytime sleepiness, snoring, and sleep duration during their 2012 interview. Overall sleep quality was evaluated by summarizing these four sleep parameters. Fasting blood samples and single random midstream morning urine samples were collected in 2012 and analyzed for serum creatinine and proteinuria. CKD was defined by eGFR<60 ml/min per 1.73 m2 or proteinuria >300 mg/dl. We also examined those at high or very high risk of having CKD, on the basis of the Kidney Disease Improving Global Outcomes recommendations. The association between sleep quality and CKD was assessed using logistic regression model. RESULTS: Worse overall sleep quality was associated with higher likelihood of being high or very high risk for CKD (multiadjusted odds ratio, 2.69; 95% confidence interval, 1.30 to 5.59 comparing two extreme categories; P trend <0.01), but not overall CKD (multiadjusted odds ratio, 1.58; 95% confidence interval, 0.89 to 2.80 comparing two extreme categories; P trend =0.46), after adjusting for potential confounders. Specifically, individuals with worse sleep quality were more likely to have proteinuria (multiadjusted odds ratio, 1.95; 95% confidence interval, 1.03 to 3.67 comparing two extreme categories; P trend =0.02), rather than lower eGFR level (multiadjusted mean eGFR levels were 96.4 and 93.6 ml/min per 1.73 m2 in the two extreme sleep categories, respectively; P trend =0.13). However, there was no statistically significant association between individual sleep parameters and CKD status. CONCLUSIONS: Worse overall sleep quality was associated with higher odds of being high or very high risk for CKD and proteinuria in Chinese adults. SN - 1555-905X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/28389618/Sleep_and_CKD_in_Chinese_Adults:_A_Cross_Sectional_Study_ L2 - http://cjasn.asnjournals.org/cgi/pmidlookup?view=long&amp;pmid=28389618 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -