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A Mediterranean diet lowers blood pressure and improves endothelial function: results from the MedLey randomized intervention trial.
Am J Clin Nutr. 2017 06; 105(6):1305-1313.AJ

Abstract

Background:

The consumption of a Mediterranean diet (MedDiet) is associated with a lower risk of cardiovascular disease. However, its impact on blood pressure and endothelial function is not clear.

Objective:

We sought to determine the effects of adhering to the consumption of a MedDiet for 6 mo on blood pressure and endothelial function in older, healthy Australians.

Design:

A total of 166 men and women aged >64 y were allocated via minimization to consume either a MedDiet (n = 85) or their habitual diet (HabDiet; control: n = 81) for 6 mo. The MedDiet comprised mainly plant foods, abundant extra-virgin olive oil, and minimal red meat and processed foods. A total of 152 participants commenced the study, and 137 subjects completed the study. Home blood pressure was measured on 5 consecutive days at baseline (n = 149) and at 3 and 6 mo. Endothelial function (n = 82) was assessed by flow-meditated dilatation (FMD) at baseline and 6 mo. Dietary intake was monitored with the use of 3-d weighed food records. Data were analyzed with the use of linear mixed-effects models to determine adjusted between-group differences.

Results:

The MedDiet adherence score increased significantly in the MedDiet group but not in the HabDiet group (P < 0.001). The MedDiet, compared with the HabDiet, resulted in lower systolic blood pressure (P-diet × time interaction = 0.02) [mean: -1.3 mm Hg (95% CI: -2.2, -0.3 mm Hg; P = 0.008) at 3 mo and -1.1 mm Hg (95% CI: -2.0, -0.1 mm Hg; P = 0.03) at 6 mo]. At 6 mo, the percentage of FMD was higher by 1.3% (95% CI: 0.2%, 2.4%; P = 0.026) in the MedDiet group.

Conclusion:

Australian men and women who consumed a MedDiet for 6 mo had small but significantly lower systolic blood pressure and improved endothelial function. This trial was registered at www.anzctr.org.au as ACTRN12613000602729.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Alliance for Research in Exercise, Nutrition and Activity, School of Health Sciences, and courtney.davis@mymail.unisa.edu.au.School of Medical and Health Sciences, Edith Cowan University and School of Medicine and Pharmacology, University of Western Australia, Perth, Western Australia.Flinders Center for Epidemiology and Biostatistics and.School of Psychology, Social Work and Social Policy, University of South Australia, Adelaide, South Australia.Flinders Center for Innovation in Cancer, School of Medicine, Flinders University, Adelaide, South Australia.Alliance for Research in Exercise, Nutrition and Activity, School of Health Sciences, and.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

28424187

Citation

Davis, Courtney R., et al. "A Mediterranean Diet Lowers Blood Pressure and Improves Endothelial Function: Results From the MedLey Randomized Intervention Trial." The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, vol. 105, no. 6, 2017, pp. 1305-1313.
Davis CR, Hodgson JM, Woodman R, et al. A Mediterranean diet lowers blood pressure and improves endothelial function: results from the MedLey randomized intervention trial. Am J Clin Nutr. 2017;105(6):1305-1313.
Davis, C. R., Hodgson, J. M., Woodman, R., Bryan, J., Wilson, C., & Murphy, K. J. (2017). A Mediterranean diet lowers blood pressure and improves endothelial function: results from the MedLey randomized intervention trial. The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 105(6), 1305-1313. https://doi.org/10.3945/ajcn.116.146803
Davis CR, et al. A Mediterranean Diet Lowers Blood Pressure and Improves Endothelial Function: Results From the MedLey Randomized Intervention Trial. Am J Clin Nutr. 2017;105(6):1305-1313. PubMed PMID: 28424187.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - A Mediterranean diet lowers blood pressure and improves endothelial function: results from the MedLey randomized intervention trial. AU - Davis,Courtney R, AU - Hodgson,Jonathan M, AU - Woodman,Richard, AU - Bryan,Janet, AU - Wilson,Carlene, AU - Murphy,Karen J, Y1 - 2017/04/19/ PY - 2016/10/03/received PY - 2017/03/20/accepted PY - 2017/4/21/pubmed PY - 2017/8/2/medline PY - 2017/4/21/entrez KW - Australia KW - Mediterranean diet KW - blood pressure KW - cardiovascular disease KW - flow-mediated dilatation SP - 1305 EP - 1313 JF - The American journal of clinical nutrition JO - Am. J. Clin. Nutr. VL - 105 IS - 6 N2 - Background: The consumption of a Mediterranean diet (MedDiet) is associated with a lower risk of cardiovascular disease. However, its impact on blood pressure and endothelial function is not clear.Objective: We sought to determine the effects of adhering to the consumption of a MedDiet for 6 mo on blood pressure and endothelial function in older, healthy Australians.Design: A total of 166 men and women aged >64 y were allocated via minimization to consume either a MedDiet (n = 85) or their habitual diet (HabDiet; control: n = 81) for 6 mo. The MedDiet comprised mainly plant foods, abundant extra-virgin olive oil, and minimal red meat and processed foods. A total of 152 participants commenced the study, and 137 subjects completed the study. Home blood pressure was measured on 5 consecutive days at baseline (n = 149) and at 3 and 6 mo. Endothelial function (n = 82) was assessed by flow-meditated dilatation (FMD) at baseline and 6 mo. Dietary intake was monitored with the use of 3-d weighed food records. Data were analyzed with the use of linear mixed-effects models to determine adjusted between-group differences.Results: The MedDiet adherence score increased significantly in the MedDiet group but not in the HabDiet group (P < 0.001). The MedDiet, compared with the HabDiet, resulted in lower systolic blood pressure (P-diet × time interaction = 0.02) [mean: -1.3 mm Hg (95% CI: -2.2, -0.3 mm Hg; P = 0.008) at 3 mo and -1.1 mm Hg (95% CI: -2.0, -0.1 mm Hg; P = 0.03) at 6 mo]. At 6 mo, the percentage of FMD was higher by 1.3% (95% CI: 0.2%, 2.4%; P = 0.026) in the MedDiet group.Conclusion: Australian men and women who consumed a MedDiet for 6 mo had small but significantly lower systolic blood pressure and improved endothelial function. This trial was registered at www.anzctr.org.au as ACTRN12613000602729. SN - 1938-3207 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/28424187/A_Mediterranean_diet_lowers_blood_pressure_and_improves_endothelial_function:_results_from_the_MedLey_randomized_intervention_trial_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/ajcn/article-lookup/doi/10.3945/ajcn.116.146803 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -