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An Animal-Source Food Supplement Increases Micronutrient Intakes and Iron Status among Reproductive-Age Women in Rural Vietnam.
J Nutr 2017; 147(6):1200-1207JN

Abstract

Background:

Few studies have examined the impact of local animal-source foods (ASFs) on the nutritional status of reproductive-age women in developing countries.

Objective:

We hypothesized that a midmorning snack of local ASF for 6 mo would reduce dietary micronutrient deficiencies [usual intake less than the estimated average requirement (EAR)] and improve blood biomarkers of iron, zinc, and vitamins A and B-12 status among nonpregnant, reproductive-age women in rural Vietnam.

Methods:

One hundred seventeen women, 18-30 y old, were randomly assigned to receive either an ASF (mean: 144 kcal, 8.9 mg Fe, 2.7 mg Zn, 1050 μg retinoic acid equivalent vitamin A, and 5.5 μg vitamin B-12) or a control snack (mean: 150 kcal, 2.0 mg Fe, 0.9 mg Zn, 0 μg retinoic acid equivalent vitamin A, and 0 μg vitamin B-12) 5 d/wk for 6 mo. Usual nutrient intakes were estimated by repeated 24-h dietary recalls. Blood samples were collected at baseline and 3 and 6 mo. Because of the relation between nutritional status and inflammation, serum C-reactive protein, α-1-acid-glycoprotein, and urinary tract infections (UTIs) were also monitored.

Results:

Eighty-nine women (47 in the ASF group and 42 controls) completed the study. In the ASF group, intakes of iron and vitamins A and B-12 below the EAR were eliminated, and the prevalence of a low zinc intake was reduced to 9.6% compared with 64.7% in controls (P < 0.001). At 6 mo, a modest increase (P < 0.05) in hemoglobin and iron status occurred in the ASF group compared with the control group, but plasma zinc, retinol, and serum vitamin B-12 concentrations did not differ. UTI relative risk was 3.9 (P < 0.05) among women assigned to the ASF group who had a low whole-body iron status at baseline.

Conclusions:

Adding a small amount of locally produced ASF to the diets of reproductive-age Vietnamese women improved micronutrient intakes and iron status. However, the increased UTI incidence in women in the ASF group with initially lower iron stores warrants further investigation.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Fulbright Fellow, National Institute of Nutrition, Hanoi, Vietnam. Program in International and Community Nutrition, Department of Nutrition, University of California, Davis, CA; and.Department of Applied Nutrition and Nutritional Surveillance, National Institute of Nutrition, Hanoi, Vietnam.Department of Applied Nutrition and Nutritional Surveillance, National Institute of Nutrition, Hanoi, Vietnam.Department of Applied Nutrition and Nutritional Surveillance, National Institute of Nutrition, Hanoi, Vietnam.Department of Applied Nutrition and Nutritional Surveillance, National Institute of Nutrition, Hanoi, Vietnam. Program in International and Community Nutrition, Department of Nutrition, University of California, Davis, CA; and.Program in International and Community Nutrition, Department of Nutrition, University of California, Davis, CA; and jking@chori.org. Children's Hospital Oakland Research Institute, Oakland, CA.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

28424257

Citation

Hall, Andrew G., et al. "An Animal-Source Food Supplement Increases Micronutrient Intakes and Iron Status Among Reproductive-Age Women in Rural Vietnam." The Journal of Nutrition, vol. 147, no. 6, 2017, pp. 1200-1207.
Hall AG, Ngu T, Nga HT, et al. An Animal-Source Food Supplement Increases Micronutrient Intakes and Iron Status among Reproductive-Age Women in Rural Vietnam. J Nutr. 2017;147(6):1200-1207.
Hall, A. G., Ngu, T., Nga, H. T., Quyen, P. N., Hong Anh, P. T., & King, J. C. (2017). An Animal-Source Food Supplement Increases Micronutrient Intakes and Iron Status among Reproductive-Age Women in Rural Vietnam. The Journal of Nutrition, 147(6), pp. 1200-1207. doi:10.3945/jn.116.241968.
Hall AG, et al. An Animal-Source Food Supplement Increases Micronutrient Intakes and Iron Status Among Reproductive-Age Women in Rural Vietnam. J Nutr. 2017;147(6):1200-1207. PubMed PMID: 28424257.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - An Animal-Source Food Supplement Increases Micronutrient Intakes and Iron Status among Reproductive-Age Women in Rural Vietnam. AU - Hall,Andrew G, AU - Ngu,Tu, AU - Nga,Hoang T, AU - Quyen,Phi N, AU - Hong Anh,Pham T, AU - King,Janet C, Y1 - 2017/04/19/ PY - 2016/12/13/received PY - 2017/01/13/revised PY - 2017/03/22/accepted PY - 2017/4/21/pubmed PY - 2017/7/6/medline PY - 2017/4/21/entrez KW - Vietnam KW - animal-source food KW - iron KW - micronutrient status KW - reproductive-age women SP - 1200 EP - 1207 JF - The Journal of nutrition JO - J. Nutr. VL - 147 IS - 6 N2 - Background: Few studies have examined the impact of local animal-source foods (ASFs) on the nutritional status of reproductive-age women in developing countries.Objective: We hypothesized that a midmorning snack of local ASF for 6 mo would reduce dietary micronutrient deficiencies [usual intake less than the estimated average requirement (EAR)] and improve blood biomarkers of iron, zinc, and vitamins A and B-12 status among nonpregnant, reproductive-age women in rural Vietnam.Methods: One hundred seventeen women, 18-30 y old, were randomly assigned to receive either an ASF (mean: 144 kcal, 8.9 mg Fe, 2.7 mg Zn, 1050 μg retinoic acid equivalent vitamin A, and 5.5 μg vitamin B-12) or a control snack (mean: 150 kcal, 2.0 mg Fe, 0.9 mg Zn, 0 μg retinoic acid equivalent vitamin A, and 0 μg vitamin B-12) 5 d/wk for 6 mo. Usual nutrient intakes were estimated by repeated 24-h dietary recalls. Blood samples were collected at baseline and 3 and 6 mo. Because of the relation between nutritional status and inflammation, serum C-reactive protein, α-1-acid-glycoprotein, and urinary tract infections (UTIs) were also monitored.Results: Eighty-nine women (47 in the ASF group and 42 controls) completed the study. In the ASF group, intakes of iron and vitamins A and B-12 below the EAR were eliminated, and the prevalence of a low zinc intake was reduced to 9.6% compared with 64.7% in controls (P < 0.001). At 6 mo, a modest increase (P < 0.05) in hemoglobin and iron status occurred in the ASF group compared with the control group, but plasma zinc, retinol, and serum vitamin B-12 concentrations did not differ. UTI relative risk was 3.9 (P < 0.05) among women assigned to the ASF group who had a low whole-body iron status at baseline.Conclusions: Adding a small amount of locally produced ASF to the diets of reproductive-age Vietnamese women improved micronutrient intakes and iron status. However, the increased UTI incidence in women in the ASF group with initially lower iron stores warrants further investigation. SN - 1541-6100 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/28424257/An_Animal_Source_Food_Supplement_Increases_Micronutrient_Intakes_and_Iron_Status_among_Reproductive_Age_Women_in_Rural_Vietnam_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/jn/article-lookup/doi/10.3945/jn.116.241968 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -