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An Animal-Source Food Supplement Increases Micronutrient Intakes and Iron Status among Reproductive-Age Women in Rural Vietnam.

Abstract

Background:

Few studies have examined the impact of local animal-source foods (ASFs) on the nutritional status of reproductive-age women in developing countries.

Objective:

We hypothesized that a midmorning snack of local ASF for 6 mo would reduce dietary micronutrient deficiencies [usual intake less than the estimated average requirement (EAR)] and improve blood biomarkers of iron, zinc, and vitamins A and B-12 status among nonpregnant, reproductive-age women in rural Vietnam.

Methods:

One hundred seventeen women, 18-30 y old, were randomly assigned to receive either an ASF (mean: 144 kcal, 8.9 mg Fe, 2.7 mg Zn, 1050 μg retinoic acid equivalent vitamin A, and 5.5 μg vitamin B-12) or a control snack (mean: 150 kcal, 2.0 mg Fe, 0.9 mg Zn, 0 μg retinoic acid equivalent vitamin A, and 0 μg vitamin B-12) 5 d/wk for 6 mo. Usual nutrient intakes were estimated by repeated 24-h dietary recalls. Blood samples were collected at baseline and 3 and 6 mo. Because of the relation between nutritional status and inflammation, serum C-reactive protein, α-1-acid-glycoprotein, and urinary tract infections (UTIs) were also monitored.

Results:

Eighty-nine women (47 in the ASF group and 42 controls) completed the study. In the ASF group, intakes of iron and vitamins A and B-12 below the EAR were eliminated, and the prevalence of a low zinc intake was reduced to 9.6% compared with 64.7% in controls (P < 0.001). At 6 mo, a modest increase (P < 0.05) in hemoglobin and iron status occurred in the ASF group compared with the control group, but plasma zinc, retinol, and serum vitamin B-12 concentrations did not differ. UTI relative risk was 3.9 (P < 0.05) among women assigned to the ASF group who had a low whole-body iron status at baseline.

Conclusions:

Adding a small amount of locally produced ASF to the diets of reproductive-age Vietnamese women improved micronutrient intakes and iron status. However, the increased UTI incidence in women in the ASF group with initially lower iron stores warrants further investigation.

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  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    Fulbright Fellow, National Institute of Nutrition, Hanoi, Vietnam. Program in International and Community Nutrition, Department of Nutrition, University of California, Davis, CA; and.

    ,

    Department of Applied Nutrition and Nutritional Surveillance, National Institute of Nutrition, Hanoi, Vietnam.

    ,

    Department of Applied Nutrition and Nutritional Surveillance, National Institute of Nutrition, Hanoi, Vietnam.

    ,

    Department of Applied Nutrition and Nutritional Surveillance, National Institute of Nutrition, Hanoi, Vietnam.

    ,

    Department of Applied Nutrition and Nutritional Surveillance, National Institute of Nutrition, Hanoi, Vietnam. Program in International and Community Nutrition, Department of Nutrition, University of California, Davis, CA; and.

    Program in International and Community Nutrition, Department of Nutrition, University of California, Davis, CA; and jking@chori.org. Children's Hospital Oakland Research Institute, Oakland, CA.

    Source

    The Journal of nutrition 147:6 2017 06 pg 1200-1207

    MeSH

    Adolescent
    Adult
    Anemia, Iron-Deficiency
    Animals
    Avitaminosis
    Deficiency Diseases
    Dietary Supplements
    Eggs
    Female
    Hemoglobins
    Humans
    Iron
    Meat
    Micronutrients
    Nutritional Status
    Rural Population
    Snacks
    Vietnam
    Vitamin A
    Vitamin A Deficiency
    Vitamin B 12
    Vitamin B 12 Deficiency
    Vitamins
    Young Adult
    Zinc

    Pub Type(s)

    Journal Article
    Randomized Controlled Trial
    Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    28424257

    Citation

    Hall, Andrew G., et al. "An Animal-Source Food Supplement Increases Micronutrient Intakes and Iron Status Among Reproductive-Age Women in Rural Vietnam." The Journal of Nutrition, vol. 147, no. 6, 2017, pp. 1200-1207.
    Hall AG, Ngu T, Nga HT, et al. An Animal-Source Food Supplement Increases Micronutrient Intakes and Iron Status among Reproductive-Age Women in Rural Vietnam. J Nutr. 2017;147(6):1200-1207.
    Hall, A. G., Ngu, T., Nga, H. T., Quyen, P. N., Hong Anh, P. T., & King, J. C. (2017). An Animal-Source Food Supplement Increases Micronutrient Intakes and Iron Status among Reproductive-Age Women in Rural Vietnam. The Journal of Nutrition, 147(6), pp. 1200-1207. doi:10.3945/jn.116.241968.
    Hall AG, et al. An Animal-Source Food Supplement Increases Micronutrient Intakes and Iron Status Among Reproductive-Age Women in Rural Vietnam. J Nutr. 2017;147(6):1200-1207. PubMed PMID: 28424257.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - An Animal-Source Food Supplement Increases Micronutrient Intakes and Iron Status among Reproductive-Age Women in Rural Vietnam. AU - Hall,Andrew G, AU - Ngu,Tu, AU - Nga,Hoang T, AU - Quyen,Phi N, AU - Hong Anh,Pham T, AU - King,Janet C, Y1 - 2017/04/19/ PY - 2016/12/13/received PY - 2017/01/13/revised PY - 2017/03/22/accepted PY - 2017/4/21/pubmed PY - 2017/7/6/medline PY - 2017/4/21/entrez KW - Vietnam KW - animal-source food KW - iron KW - micronutrient status KW - reproductive-age women SP - 1200 EP - 1207 JF - The Journal of nutrition JO - J. Nutr. VL - 147 IS - 6 N2 - Background: Few studies have examined the impact of local animal-source foods (ASFs) on the nutritional status of reproductive-age women in developing countries.Objective: We hypothesized that a midmorning snack of local ASF for 6 mo would reduce dietary micronutrient deficiencies [usual intake less than the estimated average requirement (EAR)] and improve blood biomarkers of iron, zinc, and vitamins A and B-12 status among nonpregnant, reproductive-age women in rural Vietnam.Methods: One hundred seventeen women, 18-30 y old, were randomly assigned to receive either an ASF (mean: 144 kcal, 8.9 mg Fe, 2.7 mg Zn, 1050 μg retinoic acid equivalent vitamin A, and 5.5 μg vitamin B-12) or a control snack (mean: 150 kcal, 2.0 mg Fe, 0.9 mg Zn, 0 μg retinoic acid equivalent vitamin A, and 0 μg vitamin B-12) 5 d/wk for 6 mo. Usual nutrient intakes were estimated by repeated 24-h dietary recalls. Blood samples were collected at baseline and 3 and 6 mo. Because of the relation between nutritional status and inflammation, serum C-reactive protein, α-1-acid-glycoprotein, and urinary tract infections (UTIs) were also monitored.Results: Eighty-nine women (47 in the ASF group and 42 controls) completed the study. In the ASF group, intakes of iron and vitamins A and B-12 below the EAR were eliminated, and the prevalence of a low zinc intake was reduced to 9.6% compared with 64.7% in controls (P < 0.001). At 6 mo, a modest increase (P < 0.05) in hemoglobin and iron status occurred in the ASF group compared with the control group, but plasma zinc, retinol, and serum vitamin B-12 concentrations did not differ. UTI relative risk was 3.9 (P < 0.05) among women assigned to the ASF group who had a low whole-body iron status at baseline.Conclusions: Adding a small amount of locally produced ASF to the diets of reproductive-age Vietnamese women improved micronutrient intakes and iron status. However, the increased UTI incidence in women in the ASF group with initially lower iron stores warrants further investigation. SN - 1541-6100 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/28424257/An_Animal_Source_Food_Supplement_Increases_Micronutrient_Intakes_and_Iron_Status_among_Reproductive_Age_Women_in_Rural_Vietnam_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/jn/article-lookup/doi/10.3945/jn.116.241968 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -