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Effect of prior foot shock stress and Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol, cannabidiolic acid, and cannabidiol on anxiety-like responding in the light-dark emergence test in rats.
Psychopharmacology (Berl) 2017; 234(14):2207-2217P

Abstract

RATIONALE

Cannabis is commonly used by humans to relieve stress.

OBJECTIVES AND METHODS

Here, we evaluate the potential of intraperitoneally (i.p.) administered Δ9-tetrahydrocannabiol (THC) and cannabidiolic acid (CBDA, the precursor of cannabidiol [CBD]) to produce dose-dependent effects on anxiety-like responding in the light-dark (LD) emergence test of anxiety-like responding in rats, when administered acutely or chronically (21 days). As well, we evaluate the potential of THC, CBDA, and CBD to reduce anxiogenic responding produced by foot shock (FS) stress 24 h prior to the LD test.

RESULTS

In the absence of the explicit FS stressor, THC (1 and 10 mg/kg) produced anxiogenic-like responding when administered acutely or chronically, but CBDA produced neither anxiogenic- nor anxiolytic-like responding. Administration of FS stress 24 h prior to the LD test enhanced anxiogenic-like responding (reduced time spent and increased latency to enter the light compartment) in rats pretreated with either vehicle (VEH) or THC (1 mg/kg); however, administration of CBDA (0.1-100 μg/kg) or CBD (5 mg/kg) prevented the FS-induced anxiogenic-like responding (an anxiolytic-like effect). The 5-hydroxytryptamine 1A (5-HT1A) receptor antagonist, WAY100635, reversed CBDA's anxiolytic effect (1 μg/kg). Combining an anxiolytic dose of CBDA (1 μg/kg) or CBD (5 mg/kg) with an anxiogenic dose of THC (1 mg/kg) did not modify THC's anxiogenic effect.

CONCLUSION

These results suggest the anxiolytic effects of CBDA and CBD may require the presence of a specific stressor.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Psychology and Collaborative Neuroscience Program, University of Guelph, Guelph, Ontario, N1G 2W1, Canada.Department of Psychology and Collaborative Neuroscience Program, University of Guelph, Guelph, Ontario, N1G 2W1, Canada.Department of Psychology and Collaborative Neuroscience Program, University of Guelph, Guelph, Ontario, N1G 2W1, Canada.Department of Psychology and Collaborative Neuroscience Program, University of Guelph, Guelph, Ontario, N1G 2W1, Canada.Institute of Drug Research, School of Pharmacy Medical Faculty, Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Jerusalem, Israel.Department of Psychology and Collaborative Neuroscience Program, University of Guelph, Guelph, Ontario, N1G 2W1, Canada. parkerl@uoguelph.ca.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

28424834

Citation

Rock, Erin M., et al. "Effect of Prior Foot Shock Stress and Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol, Cannabidiolic Acid, and Cannabidiol On Anxiety-like Responding in the Light-dark Emergence Test in Rats." Psychopharmacology, vol. 234, no. 14, 2017, pp. 2207-2217.
Rock EM, Limebeer CL, Petrie GN, et al. Effect of prior foot shock stress and Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol, cannabidiolic acid, and cannabidiol on anxiety-like responding in the light-dark emergence test in rats. Psychopharmacology (Berl). 2017;234(14):2207-2217.
Rock, E. M., Limebeer, C. L., Petrie, G. N., Williams, L. A., Mechoulam, R., & Parker, L. A. (2017). Effect of prior foot shock stress and Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol, cannabidiolic acid, and cannabidiol on anxiety-like responding in the light-dark emergence test in rats. Psychopharmacology, 234(14), pp. 2207-2217. doi:10.1007/s00213-017-4626-5.
Rock EM, et al. Effect of Prior Foot Shock Stress and Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol, Cannabidiolic Acid, and Cannabidiol On Anxiety-like Responding in the Light-dark Emergence Test in Rats. Psychopharmacology (Berl). 2017;234(14):2207-2217. PubMed PMID: 28424834.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Effect of prior foot shock stress and Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol, cannabidiolic acid, and cannabidiol on anxiety-like responding in the light-dark emergence test in rats. AU - Rock,Erin M, AU - Limebeer,Cheryl L, AU - Petrie,Gavin N, AU - Williams,Lauren A, AU - Mechoulam,Raphael, AU - Parker,Linda A, Y1 - 2017/04/20/ PY - 2017/01/23/received PY - 2017/04/02/accepted PY - 2017/4/21/pubmed PY - 2018/2/8/medline PY - 2017/4/21/entrez KW - Anxiety KW - Anxiolytic KW - Cannabidiol KW - Cannabidiolic acid KW - Foot shock KW - Light-dark emergence test KW - Rat KW - Stress KW - Δ9-tetrahydrocannabiol SP - 2207 EP - 2217 JF - Psychopharmacology JO - Psychopharmacology (Berl.) VL - 234 IS - 14 N2 - RATIONALE: Cannabis is commonly used by humans to relieve stress. OBJECTIVES AND METHODS: Here, we evaluate the potential of intraperitoneally (i.p.) administered Δ9-tetrahydrocannabiol (THC) and cannabidiolic acid (CBDA, the precursor of cannabidiol [CBD]) to produce dose-dependent effects on anxiety-like responding in the light-dark (LD) emergence test of anxiety-like responding in rats, when administered acutely or chronically (21 days). As well, we evaluate the potential of THC, CBDA, and CBD to reduce anxiogenic responding produced by foot shock (FS) stress 24 h prior to the LD test. RESULTS: In the absence of the explicit FS stressor, THC (1 and 10 mg/kg) produced anxiogenic-like responding when administered acutely or chronically, but CBDA produced neither anxiogenic- nor anxiolytic-like responding. Administration of FS stress 24 h prior to the LD test enhanced anxiogenic-like responding (reduced time spent and increased latency to enter the light compartment) in rats pretreated with either vehicle (VEH) or THC (1 mg/kg); however, administration of CBDA (0.1-100 μg/kg) or CBD (5 mg/kg) prevented the FS-induced anxiogenic-like responding (an anxiolytic-like effect). The 5-hydroxytryptamine 1A (5-HT1A) receptor antagonist, WAY100635, reversed CBDA's anxiolytic effect (1 μg/kg). Combining an anxiolytic dose of CBDA (1 μg/kg) or CBD (5 mg/kg) with an anxiogenic dose of THC (1 mg/kg) did not modify THC's anxiogenic effect. CONCLUSION: These results suggest the anxiolytic effects of CBDA and CBD may require the presence of a specific stressor. SN - 1432-2072 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/28424834/Effect_of_prior_foot_shock_stress_and_Δ9_tetrahydrocannabinol_cannabidiolic_acid_and_cannabidiol_on_anxiety_like_responding_in_the_light_dark_emergence_test_in_rats_ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -