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Altered eigenvector centrality is related to local resting-state network functional connectivity in patients with longstanding type 1 diabetes mellitus.
Hum Brain Mapp 2017; 38(7):3623-3636HB

Abstract

INTRODUCTION

Longstanding type 1 diabetes (T1DM) is associated with microangiopathy and poorer cognition. In the brain, T1DM is related to increased functional resting-state network (RSN) connectivity in patients without, which was decreased in patients with clinically evident microangiopathy. Subcortical structure seems affected in both patient groups. How these localized alterations affect the hierarchy of the functional network in T1DM is unknown. Eigenvector centrality mapping (ECM) and degree centrality are graph theoretical methods that allow determining the relative importance (ECM) and connectedness (degree centrality) of regions within the whole-brain network hierarchy.

METHODS

Therefore, ECM and degree centrality of resting-state functional MRI-scans were compared between 51 patients with, 53 patients without proliferative retinopathy, and 49 controls, and associated with RSN connectivity, subcortical gray matter volume, and cognition.

RESULTS

In all patients versus controls, ECM and degree centrality were lower in the bilateral thalamus and the dorsal striatum, with lowest values in patients without proliferative retinopathy (PFWE < 0.05). Increased ECM in this group versus patients with proliferative retinopathy was seen in the bilateral lateral occipital cortex, and in the right cuneus and occipital fusiform gyrus versus controls (PFWE < 0.05). In all patients, ECM and degree centrality were related to altered visual, sensorimotor, and auditory and language RSN connectivity (PFWE < 0.05), but not to subcortical gray matter volume or cognition (PFDR > 0.05).

CONCLUSION

The findings suggested reorganization of the hierarchy of the cortical connectivity network in patients without proliferative retinopathy, which is lost with disease progression. Centrality seems sensitive to capture early T1DM-related functional connectivity alterations, but not disease progression. Hum Brain Mapp 38:3623-3636, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Medical Psychology, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. Amsterdam Diabetes Center/Department of Internal Medicine, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. Department of Psychology, Pontifícia Universidade Católica do Rio de Janeiro (PUC-Rio), Rio de Janeiro, RJ, Brazil.Department of Anatomy and Neuroscience, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.Amsterdam Diabetes Center/Department of Internal Medicine, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.Department of Ophthalmology, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.Department of Psychology, Pontifícia Universidade Católica do Rio de Janeiro (PUC-Rio), Rio de Janeiro, RJ, Brazil.Department of Medical Psychology, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.Amsterdam Diabetes Center/Department of Internal Medicine, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.Department of Medical Psychology, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. Institute of Neurology and Healthcare Engineering, University College London, London, United Kingdom.Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

28429383

Citation

van Duinkerken, Eelco, et al. "Altered Eigenvector Centrality Is Related to Local Resting-state Network Functional Connectivity in Patients With Longstanding Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus." Human Brain Mapping, vol. 38, no. 7, 2017, pp. 3623-3636.
van Duinkerken E, Schoonheim MM, IJzerman RG, et al. Altered eigenvector centrality is related to local resting-state network functional connectivity in patients with longstanding type 1 diabetes mellitus. Hum Brain Mapp. 2017;38(7):3623-3636.
van Duinkerken, E., Schoonheim, M. M., IJzerman, R. G., Moll, A. C., Landeira-Fernandez, J., Klein, M., ... Wink, A. M. (2017). Altered eigenvector centrality is related to local resting-state network functional connectivity in patients with longstanding type 1 diabetes mellitus. Human Brain Mapping, 38(7), pp. 3623-3636. doi:10.1002/hbm.23617.
van Duinkerken E, et al. Altered Eigenvector Centrality Is Related to Local Resting-state Network Functional Connectivity in Patients With Longstanding Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus. Hum Brain Mapp. 2017;38(7):3623-3636. PubMed PMID: 28429383.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Altered eigenvector centrality is related to local resting-state network functional connectivity in patients with longstanding type 1 diabetes mellitus. AU - van Duinkerken,Eelco, AU - Schoonheim,Menno M, AU - IJzerman,Richard G, AU - Moll,Annette C, AU - Landeira-Fernandez,Jesus, AU - Klein,Martin, AU - Diamant,Michaela, AU - Snoek,Frank J, AU - Barkhof,Frederik, AU - Wink,Alle-Meije, Y1 - 2017/04/21/ PY - 2016/11/22/received PY - 2017/04/04/revised PY - 2017/04/06/accepted PY - 2017/4/22/pubmed PY - 2017/4/22/medline PY - 2017/4/22/entrez KW - cognition KW - eigenvector centrality mapping KW - graph theory KW - resting-state fMRI KW - type 1 diabetes SP - 3623 EP - 3636 JF - Human brain mapping JO - Hum Brain Mapp VL - 38 IS - 7 N2 - INTRODUCTION: Longstanding type 1 diabetes (T1DM) is associated with microangiopathy and poorer cognition. In the brain, T1DM is related to increased functional resting-state network (RSN) connectivity in patients without, which was decreased in patients with clinically evident microangiopathy. Subcortical structure seems affected in both patient groups. How these localized alterations affect the hierarchy of the functional network in T1DM is unknown. Eigenvector centrality mapping (ECM) and degree centrality are graph theoretical methods that allow determining the relative importance (ECM) and connectedness (degree centrality) of regions within the whole-brain network hierarchy. METHODS: Therefore, ECM and degree centrality of resting-state functional MRI-scans were compared between 51 patients with, 53 patients without proliferative retinopathy, and 49 controls, and associated with RSN connectivity, subcortical gray matter volume, and cognition. RESULTS: In all patients versus controls, ECM and degree centrality were lower in the bilateral thalamus and the dorsal striatum, with lowest values in patients without proliferative retinopathy (PFWE < 0.05). Increased ECM in this group versus patients with proliferative retinopathy was seen in the bilateral lateral occipital cortex, and in the right cuneus and occipital fusiform gyrus versus controls (PFWE < 0.05). In all patients, ECM and degree centrality were related to altered visual, sensorimotor, and auditory and language RSN connectivity (PFWE < 0.05), but not to subcortical gray matter volume or cognition (PFDR > 0.05). CONCLUSION: The findings suggested reorganization of the hierarchy of the cortical connectivity network in patients without proliferative retinopathy, which is lost with disease progression. Centrality seems sensitive to capture early T1DM-related functional connectivity alterations, but not disease progression. Hum Brain Mapp 38:3623-3636, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. SN - 1097-0193 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/28429383/Altered_eigenvector_centrality_is_related_to_local_resting_state_network_functional_connectivity_in_patients_with_longstanding_type_1_diabetes_mellitus_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1002/hbm.23617 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -