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Aerobic exercise promotes executive functions and impacts functional neural activity among older adults with vascular cognitive impairment.
Br J Sports Med 2018; 52(3):184-191BJ

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Vascular cognitive impairment (VCI) results from cerebrovascular disease, and worldwide, it is the second most common type of cognitive dysfunction. While targeted aerobic training is a promising approach to delay the progression of VCI by reducing cardiometabolic risk factors, few randomised controlled trials to date have specifically assessed the efficacy of aerobic training on cognitive and brain outcomes in this group at risk for functional decline.

AIM

To examine the effect of moderate-intensity aerobic training on executive functions and functional neural activity among older adults with mild subcortical ischaemic VCI (SIVCI).

METHODS

Older adults with mild SIVCI were randomly assigned to: (1) 6-month, 3×/week aerobic training (n=10) or (2) usual care (control; n=11). Participants completed functional MRI (fMRI) at baseline and trial completion. During the fMRI sessions, behavioural performance on the Eriksen flanker task and task-evoked neural activity were assessed.

RESULTS

At trial completion, after adjusting for baseline general cognition, total white matter lesion volume and flanker performance, compared with the control group, the aerobic training group significantly improved flanker task reaction time. Moreover, compared with the controls, the aerobic training group demonstrated reduced activation in the left lateral occipital cortex and right superior temporal gyrus. Reduced activity in these brain regions was significantly associated with improved (ie, faster) flanker task performance at trial completion.

SUMMARY

Aerobic training among older adults with mild SIVCI can improve executive functions and neural efficiency of associated brain areas. Future studies with greater sample size should be completed to replicate and extend these findings.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Aging, Mobility, and Cognitive Neuroscience Lab, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. Department of Physical Therapy, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. Djavad Mowafaghian Center for Brain Health, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. Center for Hip Health and Mobility, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada.Aging, Mobility, and Cognitive Neuroscience Lab, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. Department of Physical Therapy, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. Djavad Mowafaghian Center for Brain Health, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. Center for Hip Health and Mobility, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada.Aging, Mobility, and Cognitive Neuroscience Lab, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. Department of Physical Therapy, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. Djavad Mowafaghian Center for Brain Health, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. Center for Hip Health and Mobility, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada.School of Kinesiology, Western University, London, Ontario, Canada.Aging, Mobility, and Cognitive Neuroscience Lab, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. Department of Physical Therapy, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. Djavad Mowafaghian Center for Brain Health, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. Center for Hip Health and Mobility, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada.Department of Physical Therapy, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. Djavad Mowafaghian Center for Brain Health, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada.Department of Medicine, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada.Department of Psychology, University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa, USA. Health, Brain, & Cognition Lab, University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa, USA.Department of Physical Therapy, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. Rehabilitation Research Program, Vancouver Coastal Health Research Institute, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada.Aging, Mobility, and Cognitive Neuroscience Lab, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. Department of Physical Therapy, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. Djavad Mowafaghian Center for Brain Health, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. Center for Hip Health and Mobility, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial

Language

eng

PubMed ID

28432077

Citation

Hsu, Chun Liang, et al. "Aerobic Exercise Promotes Executive Functions and Impacts Functional Neural Activity Among Older Adults With Vascular Cognitive Impairment." British Journal of Sports Medicine, vol. 52, no. 3, 2018, pp. 184-191.
Hsu CL, Best JR, Davis JC, et al. Aerobic exercise promotes executive functions and impacts functional neural activity among older adults with vascular cognitive impairment. Br J Sports Med. 2018;52(3):184-191.
Hsu, C. L., Best, J. R., Davis, J. C., Nagamatsu, L. S., Wang, S., Boyd, L. A., ... Liu-Ambrose, T. (2018). Aerobic exercise promotes executive functions and impacts functional neural activity among older adults with vascular cognitive impairment. British Journal of Sports Medicine, 52(3), pp. 184-191. doi:10.1136/bjsports-2016-096846.
Hsu CL, et al. Aerobic Exercise Promotes Executive Functions and Impacts Functional Neural Activity Among Older Adults With Vascular Cognitive Impairment. Br J Sports Med. 2018;52(3):184-191. PubMed PMID: 28432077.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Aerobic exercise promotes executive functions and impacts functional neural activity among older adults with vascular cognitive impairment. AU - Hsu,Chun Liang, AU - Best,John R, AU - Davis,Jennifer C, AU - Nagamatsu,Lindsay S, AU - Wang,Shirley, AU - Boyd,Lara A, AU - Hsiung,Gy Robin, AU - Voss,Michelle W, AU - Eng,Janice Jennifer, AU - Liu-Ambrose,Teresa, Y1 - 2017/04/21/ PY - 2017/03/23/accepted PY - 2017/4/23/pubmed PY - 2018/2/13/medline PY - 2017/4/23/entrez KW - Exercise SP - 184 EP - 191 JF - British journal of sports medicine JO - Br J Sports Med VL - 52 IS - 3 N2 - BACKGROUND: Vascular cognitive impairment (VCI) results from cerebrovascular disease, and worldwide, it is the second most common type of cognitive dysfunction. While targeted aerobic training is a promising approach to delay the progression of VCI by reducing cardiometabolic risk factors, few randomised controlled trials to date have specifically assessed the efficacy of aerobic training on cognitive and brain outcomes in this group at risk for functional decline. AIM: To examine the effect of moderate-intensity aerobic training on executive functions and functional neural activity among older adults with mild subcortical ischaemic VCI (SIVCI). METHODS: Older adults with mild SIVCI were randomly assigned to: (1) 6-month, 3×/week aerobic training (n=10) or (2) usual care (control; n=11). Participants completed functional MRI (fMRI) at baseline and trial completion. During the fMRI sessions, behavioural performance on the Eriksen flanker task and task-evoked neural activity were assessed. RESULTS: At trial completion, after adjusting for baseline general cognition, total white matter lesion volume and flanker performance, compared with the control group, the aerobic training group significantly improved flanker task reaction time. Moreover, compared with the controls, the aerobic training group demonstrated reduced activation in the left lateral occipital cortex and right superior temporal gyrus. Reduced activity in these brain regions was significantly associated with improved (ie, faster) flanker task performance at trial completion. SUMMARY: Aerobic training among older adults with mild SIVCI can improve executive functions and neural efficiency of associated brain areas. Future studies with greater sample size should be completed to replicate and extend these findings. SN - 1473-0480 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/28432077/Aerobic_exercise_promotes_executive_functions_and_impacts_functional_neural_activity_among_older_adults_with_vascular_cognitive_impairment_ L2 - http://bjsm.bmj.com/cgi/pmidlookup?view=long&pmid=28432077 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -