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High Prevalence of Polycystic Ovary Syndrome in Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus Adolescents: Is There a Difference Depending on the NIH and Rotterdam Criteria?

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is more frequently observed in type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) adult women than in nondiabetic women. No such prevalence has yet been studied in adolescent girls with T1DM.

AIM

The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of PCOS in adolescent girls with T1DM and to determine the clinical and hormonal features associated with the disorder.

METHODS

A cross-sectional study of 53 adolescent girls (gynecological age >2 years) referred for routine evaluation for T1DM was conducted. We diagnosed PCOS using the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and Rotterdam criteria.

RESULTS

26.4 and 47.9% of adolescents had PCOS according to NIH (NIH-PCOS) and Rotterdam (Rotterdam-PCOS) criteria. 66.7% of NIH-PCOS adolescents had a complete phenotype associated with hyperandrogenism, oligomenorrhea, and polycystic ovarian morphology, unlike only 33.3% of the Rotterdam-PCOS adolescents. A family history of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) was more frequent in PCOS than in non-PCOS girls, whichever criteria were used. Late pubertal development and a T1DM diagnosis close to puberty were factors associated with NIH-PCOS.

CONCLUSION

Adolescents with T1DM had a high prevalence of PCOS. More differences between PCOS and non-PCOS patients were found using the NIH criteria, suggesting that clinical characteristics might be more accurate for diagnosing PCOS in girls with T1DM. A family history of T2DM is associated with a high risk of PCOS.

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  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    Department of Paediatric Endocrinology, Gynaecology, and Diabetology, Necker - Enfants Malades Teaching Hospital, Assistance Publique - Hôpitaux de Paris, IMAGINE Affiliate, Paris, France. INSERM U1016, Université Paris Descartes, Sorbonne Paris Cité, Paris, France.

    ,

    Department of Paediatric Endocrinology, Gynaecology, and Diabetology, Necker - Enfants Malades Teaching Hospital, Assistance Publique - Hôpitaux de Paris, IMAGINE Affiliate, Paris, France.

    ,

    Department of Paediatric Endocrinology, Gynaecology, and Diabetology, Necker - Enfants Malades Teaching Hospital, Assistance Publique - Hôpitaux de Paris, IMAGINE Affiliate, Paris, France.

    ,

    Department of Paediatric Endocrinology and Diabetology, Robert Debré Teaching Hospital, Assistance Publique - Hôpitaux de Paris, Paris, France.

    ,

    Department of Paediatric Endocrinology and Diabetology, Robert Debré Teaching Hospital, Assistance Publique - Hôpitaux de Paris, Paris, France.

    ,

    Department of Paediatric Endocrinology and Diabetology, Robert Debré Teaching Hospital, Assistance Publique - Hôpitaux de Paris, Paris, France.

    ,

    Department of Paediatric Endocrinology and Diabetology, Robert Debré Teaching Hospital, Assistance Publique - Hôpitaux de Paris, Paris, France.

    ,

    Department of Paediatric Endocrinology, Gynaecology, and Diabetology, Necker - Enfants Malades Teaching Hospital, Assistance Publique - Hôpitaux de Paris, IMAGINE Affiliate, Paris, France.

    ,

    Clinical Investigation Center, Robert Debré Hospital, Assistance Publique - Hôpitaux de Paris, Paris, France.

    ,

    Clinical Investigation Center, Robert Debré Hospital, Assistance Publique - Hôpitaux de Paris, Paris, France.

    ,

    Division of Physiology, Necker - Enfants Malades Teaching Hospital, Assistance Publique - Hôpitaux de Paris, University Paris Descartes, Sorbonne Paris Cité, Paris, France.

    ,

    Department of Paediatric Endocrinology, Gynaecology, and Diabetology, Necker - Enfants Malades Teaching Hospital, Assistance Publique - Hôpitaux de Paris, IMAGINE Affiliate, Paris, France.

    ,

    Department of Paediatric Endocrinology, Gynaecology, and Diabetology, Necker - Enfants Malades Teaching Hospital, Assistance Publique - Hôpitaux de Paris, IMAGINE Affiliate, Paris, France.

    Department of Paediatric Endocrinology, Gynaecology, and Diabetology, Necker - Enfants Malades Teaching Hospital, Assistance Publique - Hôpitaux de Paris, IMAGINE Affiliate, Paris, France. INSERM U1016, Université Paris Descartes, Sorbonne Paris Cité, Paris, France.

    Source

    Hormone research in paediatrics 87:5 2017 pg 333-341

    MeSH

    Adolescent
    Child
    Diabetes Complications
    Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1
    Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2
    Female
    Humans
    Hyperandrogenism
    Oligomenorrhea
    Polycystic Ovary Syndrome
    Prevalence
    Puberty

    Pub Type(s)

    Clinical Trial
    Journal Article
    Multicenter Study

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    28437788

    Citation

    Busiah, Kanetee, et al. "High Prevalence of Polycystic Ovary Syndrome in Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus Adolescents: Is There a Difference Depending On the NIH and Rotterdam Criteria?" Hormone Research in Paediatrics, vol. 87, no. 5, 2017, pp. 333-341.
    Busiah K, Colmenares A, Bidet M, et al. High Prevalence of Polycystic Ovary Syndrome in Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus Adolescents: Is There a Difference Depending on the NIH and Rotterdam Criteria? Horm Res Paediatr. 2017;87(5):333-341.
    Busiah, K., Colmenares, A., Bidet, M., Tubiana-Rufi, N., Levy-Marchal, C., Delcroix, C., ... Polak, M. (2017). High Prevalence of Polycystic Ovary Syndrome in Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus Adolescents: Is There a Difference Depending on the NIH and Rotterdam Criteria? Hormone Research in Paediatrics, 87(5), pp. 333-341. doi:10.1159/000471805.
    Busiah K, et al. High Prevalence of Polycystic Ovary Syndrome in Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus Adolescents: Is There a Difference Depending On the NIH and Rotterdam Criteria. Horm Res Paediatr. 2017;87(5):333-341. PubMed PMID: 28437788.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - High Prevalence of Polycystic Ovary Syndrome in Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus Adolescents: Is There a Difference Depending on the NIH and Rotterdam Criteria? AU - Busiah,Kanetee, AU - Colmenares,Ana, AU - Bidet,Maud, AU - Tubiana-Rufi,Nadia, AU - Levy-Marchal,Claire, AU - Delcroix,Christine, AU - Jacquin,Paul, AU - Martin,Delphine, AU - Benadjaoud,Lila, AU - Jacqz-Aigrain,Evelyne, AU - Laborde,Kathleen, AU - Robert,Jean-Jacques, AU - Samara-Boustani,Dinane, AU - Polak,Michel, Y1 - 2017/04/24/ PY - 2016/12/14/received PY - 2017/03/20/accepted PY - 2017/4/25/pubmed PY - 2018/3/27/medline PY - 2017/4/25/entrez KW - Adolescence KW - Hyperandrogenism KW - NIH and Rotterdam criteria KW - Polycystic ovary syndrome KW - Type 1 diabetes mellitus SP - 333 EP - 341 JF - Hormone research in paediatrics JO - Horm Res Paediatr VL - 87 IS - 5 N2 - BACKGROUND: Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is more frequently observed in type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) adult women than in nondiabetic women. No such prevalence has yet been studied in adolescent girls with T1DM. AIM: The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of PCOS in adolescent girls with T1DM and to determine the clinical and hormonal features associated with the disorder. METHODS: A cross-sectional study of 53 adolescent girls (gynecological age >2 years) referred for routine evaluation for T1DM was conducted. We diagnosed PCOS using the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and Rotterdam criteria. RESULTS: 26.4 and 47.9% of adolescents had PCOS according to NIH (NIH-PCOS) and Rotterdam (Rotterdam-PCOS) criteria. 66.7% of NIH-PCOS adolescents had a complete phenotype associated with hyperandrogenism, oligomenorrhea, and polycystic ovarian morphology, unlike only 33.3% of the Rotterdam-PCOS adolescents. A family history of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) was more frequent in PCOS than in non-PCOS girls, whichever criteria were used. Late pubertal development and a T1DM diagnosis close to puberty were factors associated with NIH-PCOS. CONCLUSION: Adolescents with T1DM had a high prevalence of PCOS. More differences between PCOS and non-PCOS patients were found using the NIH criteria, suggesting that clinical characteristics might be more accurate for diagnosing PCOS in girls with T1DM. A family history of T2DM is associated with a high risk of PCOS. SN - 1663-2826 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/28437788/High_Prevalence_of_Polycystic_Ovary_Syndrome_in_Type_1_Diabetes_Mellitus_Adolescents:_Is_There_a_Difference_Depending_on_the_NIH_and_Rotterdam_Criteria L2 - https://www.karger.com?DOI=10.1159/000471805 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -