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Multi-Nonvolatile State Resistive Switching Arising from Ferroelectricity and Oxygen Vacancy Migration.
Adv Mater 2017; 29(24)AM

Abstract

Resistive switching phenomena form the basis of competing memory technologies. Among them, resistive switching, originating from oxygen vacancy migration (OVM), and ferroelectric switching offer two promising approaches. OVM in oxide films/heterostructures can exhibit high/low resistive state via conducting filament forming/deforming, while the resistive switching of ferroelectric tunnel junctions (FTJs) arises from barrier height or width variation while ferroelectric polarization reverses between asymmetric electrodes. Here the authors demonstrate a coexistence of OVM and ferroelectric induced resistive switching in a BaTiO3 FTJ by comparing BaTiO3 with SrTiO3 based tunnel junctions. This coexistence results in two distinguishable loops with multi-nonvolatile resistive states. The primary loop originates from the ferroelectric switching. The second loop emerges at a voltage close to the SrTiO3 switching voltage, showing OVM being its origin. BaTiO3 based devices with controlled oxygen vacancies enable us to combine the benefits of both OVM and ferroelectric tunneling to produce multistate nonvolatile memory devices.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Condensed Matter Science and Technology Institute, Department of Physics, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin, 150001, China.Department of Material Science & Engineering, National University of Singapore, Singapore, 117575, Singapore. NUSNNI-Nanocore, National University of Singapore, Singapore, 117411, Singapore.Condensed Matter Science and Technology Institute, Department of Physics, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin, 150001, China.Department of Material Science & Engineering, National University of Singapore, Singapore, 117575, Singapore. State Key Laboratory of Marine Resource Utilization in South China Sea, Hainan University, Haikou, 570228, China. Department of Mechanical Engineering, National University of Singapore, Singapore, 117575, Singapore.Department of Material Science & Engineering, National University of Singapore, Singapore, 117575, Singapore.Condensed Matter Science and Technology Institute, Department of Physics, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin, 150001, China.School of Physical and Mathematical Sciences & School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Nayang Technological University, Singapore, 637371, Singapore.NUSNNI-Nanocore, National University of Singapore, Singapore, 117411, Singapore.NUSNNI-Nanocore, National University of Singapore, Singapore, 117411, Singapore.NUSNNI-Nanocore, National University of Singapore, Singapore, 117411, Singapore. Department of Physics, National University of Singapore, Singapore, 117571, Singapore.NUSNNI-Nanocore, National University of Singapore, Singapore, 117411, Singapore. Department of Physics, National University of Singapore, Singapore, 117571, Singapore.Department of Mechanical Engineering, National University of Singapore, Singapore, 117575, Singapore.Department of Material Science & Engineering, National University of Singapore, Singapore, 117575, Singapore. NUS Graduate School for Integrative Sciences and Engineering, National University of Singapore, Singapore, 117456, Singapore.NUSNNI-Nanocore, National University of Singapore, Singapore, 117411, Singapore. Department of Physics, National University of Singapore, Singapore, 117571, Singapore. NUS Graduate School for Integrative Sciences and Engineering, National University of Singapore, Singapore, 117456, Singapore.Condensed Matter Science and Technology Institute, Department of Physics, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin, 150001, China.Department of Material Science & Engineering, National University of Singapore, Singapore, 117575, Singapore. NUSNNI-Nanocore, National University of Singapore, Singapore, 117411, Singapore. Department of Physics, National University of Singapore, Singapore, 117571, Singapore. NUS Graduate School for Integrative Sciences and Engineering, National University of Singapore, Singapore, 117456, Singapore. Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, National University of Singapore, Singapore, 117576, Singapore.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

28439926

Citation

Lü, Weiming, et al. "Multi-Nonvolatile State Resistive Switching Arising From Ferroelectricity and Oxygen Vacancy Migration." Advanced Materials (Deerfield Beach, Fla.), vol. 29, no. 24, 2017.
Lü W, Li C, Zheng L, et al. Multi-Nonvolatile State Resistive Switching Arising from Ferroelectricity and Oxygen Vacancy Migration. Adv Mater Weinheim. 2017;29(24).
Lü, W., Li, C., Zheng, L., Xiao, J., Lin, W., Li, Q., ... Venkatesan, T. (2017). Multi-Nonvolatile State Resistive Switching Arising from Ferroelectricity and Oxygen Vacancy Migration. Advanced Materials (Deerfield Beach, Fla.), 29(24), doi:10.1002/adma.201606165.
Lü W, et al. Multi-Nonvolatile State Resistive Switching Arising From Ferroelectricity and Oxygen Vacancy Migration. Adv Mater Weinheim. 2017;29(24) PubMed PMID: 28439926.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Multi-Nonvolatile State Resistive Switching Arising from Ferroelectricity and Oxygen Vacancy Migration. AU - Lü,Weiming, AU - Li,Changjian, AU - Zheng,Limei, AU - Xiao,Juanxiu, AU - Lin,Weinan, AU - Li,Qiang, AU - Wang,Xiao Renshaw, AU - Huang,Zhen, AU - Zeng,Shengwei, AU - Han,Kun, AU - Zhou,Wenxiong, AU - Zeng,Kaiyang, AU - Chen,Jingsheng, AU - Ariando,, AU - Cao,Wenwu, AU - Venkatesan,Thirumalai, Y1 - 2017/04/25/ PY - 2016/11/15/received PY - 2017/03/18/revised PY - 2017/4/26/pubmed PY - 2017/4/26/medline PY - 2017/4/26/entrez KW - ferroelectric tunnel junctions KW - multi-nonvolatile memories KW - oxide interfaces KW - oxygen vacancies KW - resistive switching JF - Advanced materials (Deerfield Beach, Fla.) JO - Adv. Mater. Weinheim VL - 29 IS - 24 N2 - Resistive switching phenomena form the basis of competing memory technologies. Among them, resistive switching, originating from oxygen vacancy migration (OVM), and ferroelectric switching offer two promising approaches. OVM in oxide films/heterostructures can exhibit high/low resistive state via conducting filament forming/deforming, while the resistive switching of ferroelectric tunnel junctions (FTJs) arises from barrier height or width variation while ferroelectric polarization reverses between asymmetric electrodes. Here the authors demonstrate a coexistence of OVM and ferroelectric induced resistive switching in a BaTiO3 FTJ by comparing BaTiO3 with SrTiO3 based tunnel junctions. This coexistence results in two distinguishable loops with multi-nonvolatile resistive states. The primary loop originates from the ferroelectric switching. The second loop emerges at a voltage close to the SrTiO3 switching voltage, showing OVM being its origin. BaTiO3 based devices with controlled oxygen vacancies enable us to combine the benefits of both OVM and ferroelectric tunneling to produce multistate nonvolatile memory devices. SN - 1521-4095 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/28439926/Multi_Nonvolatile_State_Resistive_Switching_Arising_from_Ferroelectricity_and_Oxygen_Vacancy_Migration_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1002/adma.201606165 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -