Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Training dual tasks together or apart in Parkinson's disease: Results from the DUALITY trial.
Mov Disord. 2017 Aug; 32(8):1201-1210.MD

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES

Many controversies surround the usefulness of dual-task training in Parkinson's disease (PD). This study (1) compared the efficacy of two different dual-task training programs for improving dual-task gait and (2) assessed the possible fall risk of such training.

METHODS

Patients (N = 121) with a diagnosis of PD (aged 65.93 [±9.22] years, Hoehn and Yahr stage II-III on-medication) were randomized to (1) a consecutive group in which gait and cognitive tasks were trained separately or (2) an integrated group in which gait and cognitive tasks were trained simultaneously. Both interventions involved 6 weeks of at-home physiotherapist-led training. Two baseline tests were performed as a 6-week control period before training. Posttests were performed immediately after training and at 12-week follow-up. Dual-task gait was assessed during trained and untrained secondary tasks to assess consolidation of learning. Fall risk was determined by a weekly telephone call for 24 weeks.

RESULTS

No significant time by group interactions were found, suggesting that both training modes had a similar effect on dual-task gait. Immediately after training, and not after the control period, significant improvements (P < .001) in dual-task gait velocity were found in all trained and untrained dual tasks. Improvements ranged between 7.75% and 13.44% when compared with baseline values and were retained at 12-week follow-up. No significant change in fall risk occurred in both study arms (P = .84).

CONCLUSIONS

Consecutive and integrated dual-task training led to similar and sustained improvements in dual-task gait velocity without increasing fall risk. These novel findings support adoption of dual-task training in clinical practice. © 2017 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Rehabilitation Sciences, Faculty of Kinesiology and Rehabilitation, KU Leuven, Leuven, Belgium.Department of Neurology, Nijmegen Centre for Evidence Based Practice, Radboud University Medical Centre, Nijmegen, The Netherlands.Department of Rehabilitation Sciences, Faculty of Kinesiology and Rehabilitation, KU Leuven, Leuven, Belgium.Department of Neurology, Nijmegen Centre for Evidence Based Practice, Radboud University Medical Centre, Nijmegen, The Netherlands.Department of Neurology, Amphia Hospital, Breda, The Netherlands.Department of Neurology, University Hospitals Leuven, Leuven, Belgium. Department of Neurosciences, KU Leuven, Leuven, Belgium.Department of Neurology, Donders Institute for Brain, Cognition and Behaviour, Radboud University Medical Centre, Nijmegen, The Netherlands.Department of Rehabilitation Sciences, Faculty of Kinesiology and Rehabilitation, KU Leuven, Leuven, Belgium.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Randomized Controlled Trial

Language

eng

PubMed ID

28440888

Citation

Strouwen, Carolien, et al. "Training Dual Tasks Together or Apart in Parkinson's Disease: Results From the DUALITY Trial." Movement Disorders : Official Journal of the Movement Disorder Society, vol. 32, no. 8, 2017, pp. 1201-1210.
Strouwen C, Molenaar EALM, Münks L, et al. Training dual tasks together or apart in Parkinson's disease: Results from the DUALITY trial. Mov Disord. 2017;32(8):1201-1210.
Strouwen, C., Molenaar, E. A. L. M., Münks, L., Keus, S. H. J., Zijlmans, J. C. M., Vandenberghe, W., Bloem, B. R., & Nieuwboer, A. (2017). Training dual tasks together or apart in Parkinson's disease: Results from the DUALITY trial. Movement Disorders : Official Journal of the Movement Disorder Society, 32(8), 1201-1210. https://doi.org/10.1002/mds.27014
Strouwen C, et al. Training Dual Tasks Together or Apart in Parkinson's Disease: Results From the DUALITY Trial. Mov Disord. 2017;32(8):1201-1210. PubMed PMID: 28440888.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Training dual tasks together or apart in Parkinson's disease: Results from the DUALITY trial. AU - Strouwen,Carolien, AU - Molenaar,Esther A L M, AU - Münks,Liesbeth, AU - Keus,Samyra H J, AU - Zijlmans,Jan C M, AU - Vandenberghe,Wim, AU - Bloem,Bastiaan R, AU - Nieuwboer,Alice, Y1 - 2017/04/25/ PY - 2016/10/06/received PY - 2017/03/13/revised PY - 2017/03/17/accepted PY - 2017/4/26/pubmed PY - 2018/5/1/medline PY - 2017/4/26/entrez KW - Parkinson's disease KW - executive function KW - falls KW - gait KW - rehabilitation SP - 1201 EP - 1210 JF - Movement disorders : official journal of the Movement Disorder Society JO - Mov Disord VL - 32 IS - 8 N2 - BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Many controversies surround the usefulness of dual-task training in Parkinson's disease (PD). This study (1) compared the efficacy of two different dual-task training programs for improving dual-task gait and (2) assessed the possible fall risk of such training. METHODS: Patients (N = 121) with a diagnosis of PD (aged 65.93 [±9.22] years, Hoehn and Yahr stage II-III on-medication) were randomized to (1) a consecutive group in which gait and cognitive tasks were trained separately or (2) an integrated group in which gait and cognitive tasks were trained simultaneously. Both interventions involved 6 weeks of at-home physiotherapist-led training. Two baseline tests were performed as a 6-week control period before training. Posttests were performed immediately after training and at 12-week follow-up. Dual-task gait was assessed during trained and untrained secondary tasks to assess consolidation of learning. Fall risk was determined by a weekly telephone call for 24 weeks. RESULTS: No significant time by group interactions were found, suggesting that both training modes had a similar effect on dual-task gait. Immediately after training, and not after the control period, significant improvements (P < .001) in dual-task gait velocity were found in all trained and untrained dual tasks. Improvements ranged between 7.75% and 13.44% when compared with baseline values and were retained at 12-week follow-up. No significant change in fall risk occurred in both study arms (P = .84). CONCLUSIONS: Consecutive and integrated dual-task training led to similar and sustained improvements in dual-task gait velocity without increasing fall risk. These novel findings support adoption of dual-task training in clinical practice. © 2017 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society. SN - 1531-8257 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/28440888/Training_dual_tasks_together_or_apart_in_Parkinson's_disease:_Results_from_the_DUALITY_trial_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1002/mds.27014 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -