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Climate and Allergic Sensitization to Airborne Allergens in the General Population: Data from the French Six Cities Study.
Int Arch Allergy Immunol 2017; 172(4):236-241IA

Abstract

BACKGROUND

The results of international epidemiological surveys show large geographical variations in skin test reactivity but do not provide a rationale for such variations.

OBJECTIVE

To assess the relationship between climate and allergic sensitization in schoolchildren.

METHODS

In the present study, we analyzed data from a multicenter, epidemiological survey that included 6,461 schoolchildren, aged 9-11 years, living in 6 French cities scattered around France. The protocol also included a battery of skin prick tests to common airborne allergens. The crude prevalence of sensitization to each allergen was estimated for each city and then adjusted for potential confounding factors. This analysis was repeated for monosensitization and for allergens grouped into 2 categories: indoor allergens, i.e., house dust mite (HDM), cat, and cockroach allergens, and outdoor allergens, i.e., birch pollen, grass pollen, and Alternaria. We also grouped cities according to their location on the coast, i.e., Marseille and Bordeaux, or inland, i.e., Créteil, Clermont-Ferrand, Reims, and Strasbourg.

RESULTS

A difference in prevalence of sensitization to each airborne allergen or allergens grouped into indoor and outdoor categories was found between cities, even after adjusting for potential confounding factors. Also, a higher prevalence of sensitization to HDM, cat dander, and, broadly speaking, indoor allergens, was found in children living on the coast than in those living inland, whereas they showed a lower prevalence of sensitization to birch pollen. Between-city differences in the prevalence of monosensitization were also statistically significant. Children living in coastal cities had a higher rate of monosensitization to indoor allergens and a lower prevalence of sensitization to birch pollen. The higher prevalence of allergic sensitization in children from coastal cities is most likely due to climatic conditions, such as proximity from sea and humidity. Differences in sensitization to birch allergens could be due to differential exposure to these pollen.

CONCLUSION

These results indicate a role of environmental exposure in sensitization to perennial as well as seasonal allergens.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Pneumonology and Allergy, Hôpital Nord and INSERM U 1067, Aix Marseille Université, Marseille, France.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Multicenter Study

Language

eng

PubMed ID

28456804

Citation

Charpin, Denis, et al. "Climate and Allergic Sensitization to Airborne Allergens in the General Population: Data From the French Six Cities Study." International Archives of Allergy and Immunology, vol. 172, no. 4, 2017, pp. 236-241.
Charpin D, Ramadour M, Lavaud F, et al. Climate and Allergic Sensitization to Airborne Allergens in the General Population: Data from the French Six Cities Study. Int Arch Allergy Immunol. 2017;172(4):236-241.
Charpin, D., Ramadour, M., Lavaud, F., Raherison, C., Caillaud, D., de Blay, F., ... Annesi-Maesano, I. (2017). Climate and Allergic Sensitization to Airborne Allergens in the General Population: Data from the French Six Cities Study. International Archives of Allergy and Immunology, 172(4), pp. 236-241. doi:10.1159/000471511.
Charpin D, et al. Climate and Allergic Sensitization to Airborne Allergens in the General Population: Data From the French Six Cities Study. Int Arch Allergy Immunol. 2017;172(4):236-241. PubMed PMID: 28456804.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Climate and Allergic Sensitization to Airborne Allergens in the General Population: Data from the French Six Cities Study. AU - Charpin,Denis, AU - Ramadour,Myriam, AU - Lavaud,François, AU - Raherison,Chantal, AU - Caillaud,Denis, AU - de Blay,Frederic, AU - Pauli,Gabrielle, AU - Annesi-Maesano,Isabella, Y1 - 2017/04/29/ PY - 2016/06/03/received PY - 2017/03/15/accepted PY - 2017/5/1/pubmed PY - 2017/8/30/medline PY - 2017/5/1/entrez KW - Allergy KW - Children KW - Environment KW - Epidemiology KW - Sensitization SP - 236 EP - 241 JF - International archives of allergy and immunology JO - Int. Arch. Allergy Immunol. VL - 172 IS - 4 N2 - BACKGROUND: The results of international epidemiological surveys show large geographical variations in skin test reactivity but do not provide a rationale for such variations. OBJECTIVE: To assess the relationship between climate and allergic sensitization in schoolchildren. METHODS: In the present study, we analyzed data from a multicenter, epidemiological survey that included 6,461 schoolchildren, aged 9-11 years, living in 6 French cities scattered around France. The protocol also included a battery of skin prick tests to common airborne allergens. The crude prevalence of sensitization to each allergen was estimated for each city and then adjusted for potential confounding factors. This analysis was repeated for monosensitization and for allergens grouped into 2 categories: indoor allergens, i.e., house dust mite (HDM), cat, and cockroach allergens, and outdoor allergens, i.e., birch pollen, grass pollen, and Alternaria. We also grouped cities according to their location on the coast, i.e., Marseille and Bordeaux, or inland, i.e., Créteil, Clermont-Ferrand, Reims, and Strasbourg. RESULTS: A difference in prevalence of sensitization to each airborne allergen or allergens grouped into indoor and outdoor categories was found between cities, even after adjusting for potential confounding factors. Also, a higher prevalence of sensitization to HDM, cat dander, and, broadly speaking, indoor allergens, was found in children living on the coast than in those living inland, whereas they showed a lower prevalence of sensitization to birch pollen. Between-city differences in the prevalence of monosensitization were also statistically significant. Children living in coastal cities had a higher rate of monosensitization to indoor allergens and a lower prevalence of sensitization to birch pollen. The higher prevalence of allergic sensitization in children from coastal cities is most likely due to climatic conditions, such as proximity from sea and humidity. Differences in sensitization to birch allergens could be due to differential exposure to these pollen. CONCLUSION: These results indicate a role of environmental exposure in sensitization to perennial as well as seasonal allergens. SN - 1423-0097 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/28456804/Climate_and_Allergic_Sensitization_to_Airborne_Allergens_in_the_General_Population:_Data_from_the_French_Six_Cities_Study_ L2 - https://www.karger.com?DOI=10.1159/000471511 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -