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A Cohort Study of Adolescent and Midlife Diet and Pancreatic Cancer Risk in the NIH-AARP Diet and Health Study.
Am J Epidemiol 2017; 186(3):305-317AJ

Abstract

Given the long latency period of pancreatic cancer, exploring the influence of early and midlife exposures will further advance our understanding of the disease. We assessed associations between diet and pancreatic cancer incidence in the National Institutes of Health (NIH)-AARP (formerly American Association of Retired Persons) Diet and Health Study. In 1996, a total of 303,094 participants completed 2 food frequency questionnaires that assessed diet at ages 12-13 years and 10 years previously. We used Cox proportional hazards regression to estimate adjusted hazard ratios and 95% confidence intervals. Through the end of 2006, a total of 1,322 pancreatic cancer cases occurred (average follow up time = 10.1 years). When comparing the highest tertiles with the lowest, carbohydrate intake during adolescence (hazard ratio (HR) = 0.87, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.76, 0.99), but not 10 years before baseline, was inversely associated with pancreatic cancer risk. Total fat intake 10 years before baseline was significantly associated with increased risk (HR = 1.17, 95% CI: 1.02, 1.34), while risk was higher for high fat intake during both adolescence and midlife. Calcium intake 10 years before baseline was associated with reduced risk (HR = 0.87, 95% CI: 0.76, 0.99), as was a change from low intake in adolescence to high intake in midlife (HR = 0.71, 95% CI: 0.54, 0.93). Our study found a number of dietary factors present during adolescence and midlife to be associated with pancreatic cancer.

Authors

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Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

28459946

Citation

Gordon-Dseagu, Vanessa L Z., et al. "A Cohort Study of Adolescent and Midlife Diet and Pancreatic Cancer Risk in the NIH-AARP Diet and Health Study." American Journal of Epidemiology, vol. 186, no. 3, 2017, pp. 305-317.
Gordon-Dseagu VLZ, Thompson FE, Subar AF, et al. A Cohort Study of Adolescent and Midlife Diet and Pancreatic Cancer Risk in the NIH-AARP Diet and Health Study. Am J Epidemiol. 2017;186(3):305-317.
Gordon-Dseagu, V. L. Z., Thompson, F. E., Subar, A. F., Ruder, E. H., Thiébaut, A. C. M., Potischman, N., & Stolzenberg-Solomon, R. (2017). A Cohort Study of Adolescent and Midlife Diet and Pancreatic Cancer Risk in the NIH-AARP Diet and Health Study. American Journal of Epidemiology, 186(3), pp. 305-317. doi:10.1093/aje/kwx036.
Gordon-Dseagu VLZ, et al. A Cohort Study of Adolescent and Midlife Diet and Pancreatic Cancer Risk in the NIH-AARP Diet and Health Study. Am J Epidemiol. 2017 Aug 1;186(3):305-317. PubMed PMID: 28459946.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - A Cohort Study of Adolescent and Midlife Diet and Pancreatic Cancer Risk in the NIH-AARP Diet and Health Study. AU - Gordon-Dseagu,Vanessa L Z, AU - Thompson,Frances E, AU - Subar,Amy F, AU - Ruder,Elizabeth H, AU - Thiébaut,Anne C M, AU - Potischman,Nancy, AU - Stolzenberg-Solomon,Rachael, PY - 2016/04/04/received PY - 2016/09/07/accepted PY - 2017/5/2/pubmed PY - 2017/9/19/medline PY - 2017/5/2/entrez KW - adolescent diet KW - cancer risk KW - diet KW - midlife diet KW - nutritional epidemiology KW - pancreatic cancer SP - 305 EP - 317 JF - American journal of epidemiology JO - Am. J. Epidemiol. VL - 186 IS - 3 N2 - Given the long latency period of pancreatic cancer, exploring the influence of early and midlife exposures will further advance our understanding of the disease. We assessed associations between diet and pancreatic cancer incidence in the National Institutes of Health (NIH)-AARP (formerly American Association of Retired Persons) Diet and Health Study. In 1996, a total of 303,094 participants completed 2 food frequency questionnaires that assessed diet at ages 12-13 years and 10 years previously. We used Cox proportional hazards regression to estimate adjusted hazard ratios and 95% confidence intervals. Through the end of 2006, a total of 1,322 pancreatic cancer cases occurred (average follow up time = 10.1 years). When comparing the highest tertiles with the lowest, carbohydrate intake during adolescence (hazard ratio (HR) = 0.87, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.76, 0.99), but not 10 years before baseline, was inversely associated with pancreatic cancer risk. Total fat intake 10 years before baseline was significantly associated with increased risk (HR = 1.17, 95% CI: 1.02, 1.34), while risk was higher for high fat intake during both adolescence and midlife. Calcium intake 10 years before baseline was associated with reduced risk (HR = 0.87, 95% CI: 0.76, 0.99), as was a change from low intake in adolescence to high intake in midlife (HR = 0.71, 95% CI: 0.54, 0.93). Our study found a number of dietary factors present during adolescence and midlife to be associated with pancreatic cancer. SN - 1476-6256 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/28459946/A_Cohort_Study_of_Adolescent_and_Midlife_Diet_and_Pancreatic_Cancer_Risk_in_the_NIH_AARP_Diet_and_Health_Study_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/aje/article-lookup/doi/10.1093/aje/kwx036 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -