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Syllable-constituent perception by hearing-aid users: Common factors in quiet and noise.
J Acoust Soc Am. 2017 04; 141(4):2933.JA

Abstract

The abilities of 59 adult hearing-aid users to hear phonetic details were assessed by measuring their abilities to identify syllable constituents in quiet and in differing levels of noise (12-talker babble) while wearing their aids. The set of sounds consisted of 109 frequently occurring syllable constituents (45 onsets, 28 nuclei, and 36 codas) spoken in varied phonetic contexts by eight talkers. In nominal quiet, a speech-to-noise ratio (SNR) of 40 dB, scores of individual listeners ranged from about 23% to 85% correct. Averaged over the range of SNRs commonly encountered in noisy situations, scores of individual listeners ranged from about 10% to 71% correct. The scores in quiet and in noise were very strongly correlated, R = 0.96. This high correlation implies that common factors play primary roles in the perception of phonetic details in quiet and in noise. Otherwise said, hearing-aid users' problems perceiving phonetic details in noise appear to be tied to their problems perceiving phonetic details in quiet and vice versa.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Communication Disorders Technology, Inc., Bloomington, Indiana 47408, USA.Communication Disorders Technology, Inc., Bloomington, Indiana 47408, USA.VA Loma Linda Healthcare System, Loma Linda, California 92357, USA.Department of Otolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, South Carolina 29425, USA.Communication Sciences and Disorders, University of Memphis, Memphis, Tennessee 38105, USA.Communication Sciences and Disorders, Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois 60208, USA.Hearing and Speech Sciences, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742, USA.Department of Otolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, South Carolina 29425, USA.

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

28464618

Citation

Miller, James D., et al. "Syllable-constituent Perception By Hearing-aid Users: Common Factors in Quiet and Noise." The Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, vol. 141, no. 4, 2017, p. 2933.
Miller JD, Watson CS, Leek MR, et al. Syllable-constituent perception by hearing-aid users: Common factors in quiet and noise. J Acoust Soc Am. 2017;141(4):2933.
Miller, J. D., Watson, C. S., Leek, M. R., Dubno, J. R., Wark, D. J., Souza, P. E., Gordon-Salant, S., & Ahlstrom, J. B. (2017). Syllable-constituent perception by hearing-aid users: Common factors in quiet and noise. The Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, 141(4), 2933. https://doi.org/10.1121/1.4979703
Miller JD, et al. Syllable-constituent Perception By Hearing-aid Users: Common Factors in Quiet and Noise. J Acoust Soc Am. 2017;141(4):2933. PubMed PMID: 28464618.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Syllable-constituent perception by hearing-aid users: Common factors in quiet and noise. AU - Miller,James D, AU - Watson,Charles S, AU - Leek,Marjorie R, AU - Dubno,Judy R, AU - Wark,David J, AU - Souza,Pamela E, AU - Gordon-Salant,Sandra, AU - Ahlstrom,Jayne B, PY - 2017/5/4/entrez PY - 2017/5/4/pubmed PY - 2019/7/10/medline SP - 2933 EP - 2933 JF - The Journal of the Acoustical Society of America JO - J Acoust Soc Am VL - 141 IS - 4 N2 - The abilities of 59 adult hearing-aid users to hear phonetic details were assessed by measuring their abilities to identify syllable constituents in quiet and in differing levels of noise (12-talker babble) while wearing their aids. The set of sounds consisted of 109 frequently occurring syllable constituents (45 onsets, 28 nuclei, and 36 codas) spoken in varied phonetic contexts by eight talkers. In nominal quiet, a speech-to-noise ratio (SNR) of 40 dB, scores of individual listeners ranged from about 23% to 85% correct. Averaged over the range of SNRs commonly encountered in noisy situations, scores of individual listeners ranged from about 10% to 71% correct. The scores in quiet and in noise were very strongly correlated, R = 0.96. This high correlation implies that common factors play primary roles in the perception of phonetic details in quiet and in noise. Otherwise said, hearing-aid users' problems perceiving phonetic details in noise appear to be tied to their problems perceiving phonetic details in quiet and vice versa. SN - 1520-8524 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/28464618/Syllable_constituent_perception_by_hearing_aid_users:_Common_factors_in_quiet_and_noise_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1121/1.4979703 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -